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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 5 1 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 3 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 16 (search)
h service gave promise of more rapid promotion and was more in accordance with our tastes; but the general always insisted upon retaining us on his staff. A reference to this subject occurs in Around the world with General Grant, by the Hon. John Russell Young, who accompanied him upon his tour. The language used by General Grant in one of his interviews with Mr. Young is reported as follows: Ingalls in command of troops would, in my opinion, have become a great and famous general. . . . HoMr. Young is reported as follows: Ingalls in command of troops would, in my opinion, have become a great and famous general. . . . Horace Porter was lost in the staff. Like Ingalls, he was too useful to be spared. But as a commander of troops Porter would have risen, in my opinion, to a high command. --Editor. General Meade was a most accomplished officer. He had been thoroughly educated in his profession, and had a complete knowledge of both the science and the art of war in all its branches. He was well read, possessed of a vast amount of interesting information, had cultivated his mind as a linguist, and spoke Fre
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 15: operations of the Army of the James around Richmond and Petersburg. (search)
road. General Kautz reports again that he captured all there were of Taliaferro's cavalry outside of the intrenchments. Wise further adds that he had the following additional forces: Major Archer's corps of reserves, second-class militia, and one howitzer under the command of Brigadier-General Colston, which forces he puts at less than one hundred and fifty; one company of convalescents of say a hundred men more, with say one hundred men for the two batteries of artillery, Graham's and Young's, and say one hundred and twenty men more for a company of convalescents, and a company of penitents. Penitents are soldiers who have been tried by court-martial and committed to prison for their crimes. In some emergencies at Richmond and Petersburg they were released and formed into companies to fight in defence of their prison. How much they would fight after they got a chance to run away need not be discussed. These, then, constituted the entire number of men south of the Appomatto
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 18: why I was relieved from command. (search)
aster in my movements,--let us see, I say, what were Grant's opinions of me and what his view of my military acts in his cool judgment when written through another pen than that of Badeau. In his voyage to the East, he was accompanied by Mr. John Russell Young, afterwards United States Minister to China, as his personal and valued friend. Mr. Young made minutes of his conversations, which with Grant's permission were afterwards published. In one of these Grant said:-- I have always regrettMr. Young made minutes of his conversations, which with Grant's permission were afterwards published. In one of these Grant said:-- I have always regretted the censure that unwittingly came upon Butler in that campaign, and my report was the cause. I said that General Butler was bottled up, and used the phrase without meaning to annoy the General or give his enemies a weapon. I liked Butler and have always found him not only, as all the world knows, a man of great ability, but a patriotic man, and a man of courage, honor, and sincere convictions. Butler lacked the technical experience of a military education, and it is very possible to be a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Young, John Russell 1841-1899 (search)
Young, John Russell 1841-1899 Journalist; born in Dowington, Pa., Nov. 20, 1841; received a public school education; became a copy-holder on the Philadelphia Press in 1857; was promoted to reporter, news-editor, Washington correspondent, and, at the outbreak of the Civil War, war correspondent with the Army of the Potomac; and served as such from the battle of Bull Run till the end of the Chickahominy campaign, when illness compelled him to return to Philadelphia. After his recovery he was managing editor of the Press; again went to the war in 1864, and served under General Banks in the Red River campaign; then returned to Philadelphia and resumed editorial charge of the Press. He joined the editorial staff of the New York Tribune in 1865, and was its managing editor in 1866-69, during which time he established the Morning post in Philadelphia, and the Standard in New York; was correspondent for the New York Herald in Europe in 1871-77, when he accompanied ex-President Grant o