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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 3: political affairs.--Riots in New York.--Morgan's raid North of the Ohio. (search)
en torn away b a shell, and at the dark spot seen between the two windows in the sketch, was the fracture made by a round shot that passed through the house. to the vicinity of Auburn, the residence of John Minor Botts, Mr. Botts's beautiful seat, called Auburn, was about a mile from Brandy Station, on a very slight elevation, with a little depression between his house and gentle cultivated ridges at a little distance. The writer and his friends already mentioned (Messrs. Buckingham and Young), visited this stanch Virginia Unionist, when on our way homeward from Staunton, mentioned on page 401, volume II. We had passed the preceding night and part of the day before at Culpepper Court-House and in visiting the battle-ground at Cedar Mountain. See page 448, volume II. At Culpepper Court-House we hired a carriage to convey us to Brandy Station, and our route lay across Mr. Botts's estate. We found him at home, and were very cordially received. The region just about him was a so
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 13: invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania-operations before Petersburg and in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
ited in praise of the young leader, and there was joy in every loyal heart because of his achievements. Art and song celebrated Sheridan's ride from Winchester to the front; and when, less than three weeks afterward, General McClellan resigned, Nov. 4, 1864. and thereby created a vacant major-generalship in the regular army, the victor in the Shenandoah Valley was substantially rewarded by a commission to fill his place. The writer, with friends already mentioned (Messrs. Buckingham and Young), visited the theater of Sheridan's exploits in the Shenandoah Valley, from the Opequan and Winchester to Fisher's Hill, early in October, 1866. See page 400, volume II. We left Gettysburg in a carriage, for Harper's Ferry, on the morning of the first, and followed the line of march of the corps of Howard and Sickles, when moving northward from Frederick, in the summer of 1863. See page 59. We passed through the picturesque region into which the road to Emmettsburg led us, with the Sou