Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Young or search for Young in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
rom the war, and I think the little party was given in honor of his and his brother's safe arrival home. During the evening, a gentleman, whom we afterwards learned was General Dent, a brother-in-law to General Grant, came to pay a visit to a Mrs. Young, occupying rooms on the third floor, and to whom General Dent had been, and was always, uniformly most kind. Instead of ringing the bell at once, General Dent waited several minutes—so long, indeed, as to create a pause in the conversation—and I was sent to the door. After asking for Mrs. Young, he passed up to her parlor, but stayed so short a while as to cause some slight remarks downstairs. Nothing much, however, was said, and after the company left, we retired as usual. My father, Dr. Harrison, and myself slept down in the basement, and the rest of the family up on the parlor floor. I think it must have been about 2 o'clock, when we were aroused by heavy footsteps on the porch, and a vigorous ringing of the doorbell At my fa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
rom the war, and I think the little party was given in honor of his and his brother's safe arrival home. During the evening, a gentleman, whom we afterwards learned was General Dent, a brother-in-law to General Grant, came to pay a visit to a Mrs. Young, occupying rooms on the third floor, and to whom General Dent had been, and was always, uniformly most kind. Instead of ringing the bell at once, General Dent waited several minutes—so long, indeed, as to create a pause in the conversation—and I was sent to the door. After asking for Mrs. Young, he passed up to her parlor, but stayed so short a while as to cause some slight remarks downstairs. Nothing much, however, was said, and after the company left, we retired as usual. My father, Dr. Harrison, and myself slept down in the basement, and the rest of the family up on the parlor floor. I think it must have been about 2 o'clock, when we were aroused by heavy footsteps on the porch, and a vigorous ringing of the doorbell At my fa