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D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Louis G. Young or search for Louis G. Young in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Kelleysville, March 17th, 1863-Reports of Generals J. E. B. Stuart and Fitz. Lee. (search)
nd Jno. Lamb, of Company D; Lieutenant Stamper of Company F; Lieutenant R. T. Hubbard, Company G; and First Lieutenant Hall, of Company C, (was twice wounded before he desisted from the charge, and, when retiring, received a third and still more severe wound, and was unable to leave the field). Adjutant H. B. McClellan is also particularly commended for his bravery; Acting Sergeant-Major E. N. Price, Company K; Private Keech, Company I; and Bugler Drilling. Sergeant Betts, of Company C; Privates Young, Company B; Fowler, Company G, and Wilkins, of Company C, died as became brave men, in the front of the charge at the head of the column. In the Second, the commanding officer reports, where so many behaved themselves with so much gallantry he does not like to discriminate. In the First, Captain Jordan, Company C, and Lieutenant Cecil, Company K, (specially commended for reckless daring without a parallel). As coming under my own observation, I particularly noticed Colonel T.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Second paper by Colonel Walter H. Taylor, of General Lee's staff. (search)
the wounding of General Heth, commanded by General Pettigrewand the brigades of Lane, Scales and Wilcox. The two divisions were formed in advance — the three brigades as their support. The divisions of Hood and McLaws (First corps) were passive spectators of the movement. To one who observed the charge, it appeared that Pettigrew's line was not a continuation of that of Pickett, but that it advanced in echelon. It would seem that there was some confusion in forming the troops, for Captain Louis G. Young, of General Pettigrew's staff, says: On the morning of the third of July, General Pettigrew, commanding Heth's division, was instructed to report to General Long-,street, who directed him to form in the rear of Pickett's division, and support his advance upon Cemetery Hill, which would be commenced as soon as the fire from our artillery should have driven the enemy from his guns and prepared the way for attack. And I presume that it was in consequence of this having been the