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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 2: birth.-career as officer of Engineers, United States army. (search)
then drawn for victory against a common foe, were to be pointed against each other's breasts, and those who had slept beneath the same blanket, drank from the same canteen, and formed those ties of steel which are strongest when pledged amid common dangers around a common mess table, were to be marshaled under the banners of opposing armies. Ulysses S. Grant was then twenty-five years old, a lieutenant of the Fourth Infantry, self-reliant, brave, and fertile in resources. He fought with old Zach at Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma, and at Monterey; was at Vera Cruz, and in all the battles which followed until the Mexican capital was entered. George Gordon Meade was an officer of topographical engineers, first on the staff of General Taylor and afterward on the staff of General Patterson at Vera Cruz. There too was George B. Mc-Clellan, twenty-one years old, as an engineer officer, who received brevets as first lieutenant and captain for his bravery in battle. Irvin McDowell, who aft
I will never believe it, and sent one after another to inquire without waiting for an answer. The soft-hearted old hero found time to go himself after night to inquire after Colonel Davis, and began the interview saying: My poor boy, I wish you had been shot in the body, you would have a better chance of recovering soon. I do not like wounds in the hands or feet, they cripple a soldier awfully. Note from Dubuque Herald: When the news came to Dubuque of the victory over Santa Anna by old Zach, through the tact, skill, and bravery of Colonel Jefferson Davis, who was reported mortally wounded, there was such an enthusiastic celebration and glorification, chiefly on Davis's account, as has never since taken place, and the Iowa Legislature passed resolutions complimentary to Colonel Davis, upon the gallantry displayed by himself and his brave Mississippi Riflemen at the battle of Buena Vista. Extracts from General Taylor's detailed report of the battle of Buena Vista: March
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
ng-Ensign, J. J. Kane; Acting-Master's Mate, Charles Fort. Schooner Orvetta. Acting-Master, Enos O. Adams; Acting-Master's Mates, John Broe and Stephen Nelson. Schooner John Griffiths. Acting-Master, Henry Brown; Acting-Master's Mates, Alex. Moses and John McAllister. Schooner Samuel Houston. Acting-Master, C. W. Pratt. Schooner Sarah Bruen. Acting-Master, A. Christian. Schooner Henry Janes. Acting-Ensign. Joseph A. Chadwick; Acting-Master's Mates, T. S. Russell, Zach. Predmore and Wm. Roberts. Schooner Oliver H. Lee. Acting-Ensign, Douglas F. O'Brien; Acting-Master's Mate, Cornelius Dailey. Naval station, New Orleans, La. Acting-Master, Adrien C. Starrett. Naval hospital. Surgeon, J. S. Dungan; Assistant Surgeon, J. H. Clark; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, W. H. Went-worth. Southwest Pass. Acting-Master, William Jones. The following officers participated in the battle of Mobile Bay. This list has been compiled from the official r
d was in better condition when it arrived in Savannah, than when it left Atlanta. Before closing this report, I desire to tender my thanks to Lieutenant-Colonel Moore and Major Downey, each of whom ably commanded detachments of the regiment, displaying a degree of energy and perseverance entitling them to special notice. Captains James W. Smith and C. C. Whiting rendered very important services in their positions as commanders of pontoon sections. Captain Wood Tousey, Commissary; Lieutenant Zach. Jones, Aid-de-Camp; Lieutenant Horace Hall, Aid-de-Camp; and Lieutenant Henry Torrence, Acting Assistant Quartermaster, deserve credit for their energy and promptness. In conclusion, I would state that great credit is due the officers and men of the regiment, for the manner in which they conducted themselves throughout the entire campaign; although, many times, after a hard day's march, they have had bridges to build or roads to repair, they were always on hand. Praise is likewi
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
osition gained till our reinforcements came up—I should have been the great hero of the fight, as every other attack had not only failed, but without even the success we could boast of. Well, I suppose it is all for the best, and cannot be helped; but it made me feel worse at the time than if we had been repulsed from the first. Yesterday I went to see Burnside, and found him engaged with the War Investigating Committee of Congress. They were just going to lunch and insisted on my going in. Zach. Chandler, Ben. Wade, John Covode and others were there, all of whom treated me with great distinction, particularly Covode, who claimed me as a Pennsylvanian. Old Chandler inquired very affectionately after you, but did not refer to your loyalty. They examined Burnside, Sumner, Hooker and Franklin. What the result will be I don't know, though it is said John Covode affirmed that when he got back he was going to raise a howl, and intimated it would not be against Burnside. Burnside prove
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 23: (search)
literature goes no further than his own books will carry him, and in some parts of it I remarked quite a striking ignorance, which surprised me very much until I found how it happened. I have passed two evenings with him, and, as he keeps open house very simply and kindly, after the German fashion, I think I shall go there frequently. The next acquaintance I made was that of the Minister of State, Von Lindenau. He is a mathematician and astronomer by education and choice, and, after Baron Zach left the Observatory at Gotha, was for several years the head of it. How he came at the head of affairs in Saxony I know not; but up to 1830, and indeed for some time after that revolution, he had the Portfolio of the Interior. He is liberal in his opinions, but still, not being satisfied with the course of affairs, he resigned his place two or three years ago. This, however, created so much uneasiness in the country, that he was induced to keep the place of President of the Council; and,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Terry's Brigade, formerly John M. Jones's. (search)
h North Carolina Regiment. Field and Staff. Ord. Sergeant E. H. Hornaday, Hos. Steward Benj. Hines. Co. A. 2d Sergeant Jas. P. Ashley, 5th Sergeant J. H. Osbern, Private W. Blevins, R. Bare, M. Duvall, Private Thos. Grimsley, Zach. Ausburn, C. H. Reedy, W. B. Reedy. Co. B. Sergeant E. B. Chaney, J. H. Lee, Corporal A. Eason, Private J. D. Anston, H. D. Fespirman, W. E. Norwood, Private W. E. Robertson, J. R. Simpson, Wm. Starnes, Jno. Welsh, W. T. Baker, th Ala. Regiment. W. H. Sanders, Surgeon 11th Ala. Regiment. N. D. Witherspoon, Ass't Surgeon 11th Ala. Regiment. John B. Raines, Capt. 11th Ala. Regiment. J. B. Hughes, Capt. 11th Ala. Regiment. John H. Prince, Capt. 11th Ala. Regiment. Zach. Abney, Capt. 11th Ala. Regiment. W. B. Young, 1st Lieut. 11th Ala. Regiment. Richard M. Kennedy, 1st Lieut. 11th Ala. Regiment. P. M. Vance, 1st Lieut. 11th Ala. Regiment. J. H. Adams, 2d Lieut. 11th Ala. Regiment. James N. Hays, 2d Lieut.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
ivate secretary throughout his administration, which states that Lincoln's attitude towards religion did not change after his entrance on the presidency. Want of space forbids further details, but it would be as easy to prove from precisely the same sort of evidence that Lincoln's character and conduct provoked the bitterest censure from a very great number of the most distinguished of his co-workers in his great achievements, among whom may be named Greely, Thad. Stevens, Sumner, Trumbull, Zach. Chandler, Cameron, Fred. Douglas, Beacher, Fremont, Ben. Wade, Winter Davis and Wendell Phillips, while the most bitter and contemptuous and persistent of all Lincoln's critics were Chase, his Secretary of the Treasury and Chief Justice, and Stanton, known ever since as his great War Secretary. The testimony submitted above seems to show that Lincoln was habitually indecent in his conversation—that he was guilty of grossly indecent, and yet more grossly immoral, conduct in connection wit
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A noble life. (search)
hat he was the author of a little book, the purpose of which was to attack the fundamental truths of religion, and never denied or retracted any of these views. That letter further stated that it would be as easy to prove, from precisely the same sort of evidence, that Lincoln's character and conduct provoked the bitterest censure from a very great number of the most distinguished of his co-workers in his great achievements, among whom may be named Greeley, Thad. Stevens, Sumner, Trumbull, Zach. Chandler, Fred. Douglas, Beecher, Fremont, Ben. Wade, Winter Davis and Wendell Phillips, while the most bitter and contemptuous and persistent of all Lincoln's critics were Chase, his Secretary of the Treasury and Chief Justice, and Stanton, known ever Ziace as his great War Secretary. This letter is intended to prove what is alleged in the last paragraph, and to give some further evidence of the estimate of Lincoln entertained by his contemporaries. Such light is needed, for the paean
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
hat he was the author of a little book, the purpose of which was to attack the fundamental truths of religion, and never denied or retracted any of these views. That letter further stated that it would be as easy to prove, from precisely the same sort of evidence, that Lincoln's character and conduct provoked the bitterest censure from a very great number of the most distinguished of his co-workers in his great achievements, among whom may be named Greeley, Thad. Stevens, Sumner, Trumbull, Zach. Chandler, Fred. Douglas, Beecher, Fremont, Ben. Wade, Winter Davis and Wendell Phillips, while the most bitter and contemptuous and persistent of all Lincoln's critics were Chase, his Secretary of the Treasury and Chief Justice, and Stanton, known ever Ziace as his great War Secretary. This letter is intended to prove what is alleged in the last paragraph, and to give some further evidence of the estimate of Lincoln entertained by his contemporaries. Such light is needed, for the paean
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