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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 28 2 Browse Search
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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
Colonel Cross is killed, and, notwithstanding the heroic behavior of the troops, they are brought to a stand. Brooke and Zook are now put in, Brooke following the previous direction of Cross's regiments and relieving them, and then gallantly chargirigade, which has come up on Kershaw's right; Semmes is killed, and the ridge is once more in possession of the Federals. Zook's troops come up on the right, Zook himself has been killed, and Brooke takes command of the whole line. Everything else,Zook himself has been killed, and Brooke takes command of the whole line. Everything else, however, is gone, and alone he is fiercely assailed, front, right, and left, and the line of his retreat threatened. At the same time Wofford's brigade, which, following Barksdale, has passed his right and is closing in on that flank, makes, in conhe war, was repulsed at all points. We have suffered considerably in killed and wounded; among the former are Brigadier General Paul Zook, and among the wounded, Generals Sickles, Barlow, Graham, and Warren slightly. We have taken a large number o
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 17 (search)
Remonstrance was unavailing, and Sickles despatched his aides to bring up any troops they met to fill this blank. Major Tremaine, of his staff, fell in with General Zook at the head of his brigade (Second corps), and this gallant officer instantly volunteered to take Barnes' place. When they reached the ground Barnes' disordered troops impeded the advance of the brigade. If you can't get out of the way, cried Zook, lie down and I will march over you. Barnes ordered his men to lie down, and the chivalric Zook and his splendid brigade, under the personal direction of General Birney, did march over them and right into the breach. Alas! poor Zook soon Zook soon fell, mortally wounded, and half of his brigade perished with him: it was about this time—near seven P. M.—that Sickles was struck by a cannon ball that tore off his right leg, and he was borne from the field. It was now pretty clear that General Meade had awakened to the fact which he treated with such indifference when presse
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 19 (search)
s despatched his aides to bring up any troops they met to fill this blank. Major Tremaine, of his staff, fell in with General Zook at the head of his brigade (Second corps), and this gallant officer instantly volunteered to take Barnes' place. Wheny reached the ground Barnes' disordered troops impeded the advance of the brigade. If you can't get out of the way, cried Zook, lie down and I will march over you. Barnes ordered his men to lie down, and the chivalrous Zook and his splendid brigade, under the personal direction of General Birney, did march over them and right into the breach. Alas! poor Zook soon fell mortally wounded, and half his brigade perished with him. All this is pure invention. No such occurrence as is here relateen to me by General Birney. None was received by me through any one from General Sickles. I did not see or hear from General Zook. I did not meet him in any way. I did not know he was there, and the article above referred to is the first intimatio
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), Appendix O (search)
I narrated that Barnes' Division suddenly fell back and left a gap in the line of battle, and that General Birney by desire of General Sickles remonstrated at his conduct, but that Barnes refused to return to his position. I further declared that Zook's Brigade, which came up gallantly to supply the defection of Barnes, marched over his troops, who were ordered to lie down for this purpose. As General Barnes denies all this roundly, under his own signature, it is proper I should give the nameso avail, for Barnes retired. I copied the following from General Birney's letter:— He (Barnes) moved to the rear from three to four hundred yards, and formed in the rear of the road which passed from the Emmettsburg Road to the Round Top. When Zook's Brigade, the first one brought to me, came up, Barnes' troops (being in the way) were, at my request, ordered to lie down, and the Brigade from the Second corps passed over their prostrate bodies into the fight, under my command, relieving de Tr
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), Appendix Y (search)
lowing despatch to General Halleck, that is, an hour before the council terminated, it is fair to presume what General Meade's intentions were before the decision of the corps commanders had been reached. Headquarters army of the Potomac, July 2, 1863, 11 P. M. General Halleck: The enemy attacked me about 4 P. M. this day, and, after one of the severest contests of the war, was repulsed at all points. We have suffered considerably in killed and wounded; among the former are Brigadier-General Paul Zook; and among the wounded, Generals Sickles, Barlow, Graham; and Warren, slightly. We have taken a large number of prisoners. I shall remain in my present position to-morrow, but am not prepared to say, until better advised of the condition of the army, whether my operations will be of an offensive or defensive character. George G. Meade, Major General. If any testimony be demanded, additional to that which now seems conclusive against the charge that General Meade intended to
., I, 17, 96, 139, 140, 245; II, 205, 238, 259, 270. Wise, John, II, 261. Wise, Nene, II, 277. Wise, Oby, I, 246. Wise, Peyton, II, 206, 238. Wise, Mrs., Tully, II, 278. Wises, II, 151, 278. Wistar, Isaac J., I, 226. Wister, Capt., II, 232. Wister, Francis, I, 254. Wister, Langhorne, II, 53. Wofford, W. T., II, 80, 86. Wood, Thos. J., I, 25, 29, 32, 33, 49, 51, 111. Woodruff, Isaac C., I, 228, 346, 355. Wool, John E., I, 111, 112, 148, 152, 153, 168, 170, 173, 249. Worsam, Henrietta Constantia, I, 2. Worsam, Richard, I, 2. Worth, Wm. J., I, 26, 52, 54, 87, 88, 98-101, 123-125, 133, 136, 139-141, 144, 146-147, 150, 152, 153, 155, 156, 166-168, 170, 173, 174, 176, 177, 191, 194, 195, 199. Wright, Gen., I, 360. Wright, Horatio G., II, 100, 127, 140, 213, 218, 268, 375. Y Young, Dr., II, 152. Young, Mr., II, 149. Young, C. A., I, 212. Z Zollicoffer, F. K., I, 243. Zook, Paul, II, 86, 96, 327, 328, 333, 339, 419.