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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
e, on which day we advanced skirmishingn) and found the enemy strongly intrenched on Pine Mountain, with his left toward Lost and his right toward Kenesaw Mountain. June 11, took position on the left of Hooker and the right of Wood's division, and threw up earth-works with lumber revetments for artillery and riflemen. Keeping a heavy line of skirmishers forward, the enemy opened from Pine Mountain with artillery. Remained in this position, with severe skirmishing, the 12th, 13th, and 14th of June. On the 14th a shell from the Fifth Indiana Battery, commanded by Lieutenant Morrison, fired from a 3-inch Rodman gun, from the section commanded by Lieutenant Ellison, killed Lieutenant-General Polk of the rebel army, who, in company with Generals Johnston and Hardee, was surveying our lines from Pine Mountain. June 15, the rebels vacated Pine Mountain and its strong defenses. We advanced in pursuit and occupied Pine Mountain. We found the enemy in another line of works in cannon-rang
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
il the night of June 4, when the enemy withdrew from our front, June 6, marched with the corps east ten miles to within two and a half miles of Acworth, on the railroad, where we remained with comparative quietness until June 10, when we moved three miles southeast and found the enemy in strong position on Pine Mountain in my front. Skirmishing commenced and continued until the night of June 13, when the enemy retreated and my brigade advanced upon the mountain early on the morning of June 14. On this mountain is where Bishop Polk, general of the rebel army, fell by a shot from the Fifth Indiana Artillery, Captain Simonson. The battery was in position at the front and right of my lines. We pursued the enemy two miles to his new position, and found him strongly fortified. June 16, advanced my lines of trenches, with hard skirmishing. On this day we had the sad misfortune to lose the brave and gallant officer, Captain Simonson, our chief of artillery. June 17, the enemy agai
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 32 (search)
t in camp all day and night. June 10, struck tents at 6 a. m. and marched about three miles in a southerly direction; came up with the enemy and formed line of battle, and encamped for the night. June 11, occupied the same position throughout the day; no fighting of consequence in our front. June 12, still hold the same position as yesterday; nothing but skirmishing through the day. June 13, remained in the same place throughout the day; nothing but the usual picket-firing in our front. June 14, moved one-half mile to the left, and encamped for the night. June 15, the enemy evacuated our front early this morning and were immediately followed, my regiment in advance of the division. After marching nearly three miles Company A came upon the enemy; it being deployed as skirmishers, we drove the enemy about one mile farther, when we stopped and built a line of works, and remained in them during the night. Casualties during the day, 2 men severely wounded. June 16, occupy the same
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
Friday, June 10, the regiment left camp at 7 a. m., and marched four miles and encamped near Pine Knob, or Pine Top, near the enemy, our regiment on the second line, and was not engaged with the enemy. On Saturday and Sunday, 11th and 12th of June, the regiment still lay in camp on the second line in the same position as on the 10th. On Monday, June 13, the regiment moved one mile to the left, and threw up new works during the night. The rebels in front evacuated the same night. On Tuesday, June 14, the regiment moved forward one mile; finding the enemy in force, we here threw up new works; casualties, 1 enlisted man wounded. On Wednesday, June 15, the regiment continued in the same position as on the 14th. We had some skirmishing, but — no casualties. On Thursday, June 16, the operations were the same as on the 14th and 15th; the casualties of the regiment, 1 enlisted man wounded. During the night the rebels fell back. On Friday, June 17, the regiment moved forward some dist
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
remained in the same position. June 6, marched to Morris' Hill Church, bringing up the rear of the corps, and leaving Kimball's brigade behind to guard and bring up the corps hospitals. June 7, General Kimball having performed this duty, rejoined the division. He had several skirmishes with the enemy's cavalry. June 8 and 9, remained in camp. June 10, marched to a position in front of Pine Mountain, taking position to the right and rear of General Stanley's division. June 11, 12, 13, and 14, skirmishing and changes of position. The enemy retired on the night of the 14th. June 15, the corps was ordered to attack the enemy in his new position, my division to lead. Division was formed in column of attack, preceded by three regiments deployed as skirmishers, under command of Colonel Bradley, Fifty-first Illinois, who conducted the advance with great skill. The enemy's skirmishers were steadily driven out of skirmish pits in strong positions, and forced back to their main line of
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
n ordered to Nashville for medical treatment, Lieutenant-Colonel Kerr took command of regiment to-day. June 11, moved at 9 a. m. very slowly, the road being crowded with troops, and at 12 halted near Pine Mountain. Remained at this place until June 14. The roads were very bad by reason of daily heavy rains. June 14, advanced one mile. June 15, from 2 p. m. to 6 p. m., advanced two miles, regiment being formed in close column by division, and bayonets fixed, in momentary expectation of a chaJune 14, advanced one mile. June 15, from 2 p. m. to 6 p. m., advanced two miles, regiment being formed in close column by division, and bayonets fixed, in momentary expectation of a charge. At 6 p. m., enemy being found strongly posted in our immediate front, the brigade halted and immediately built a line of works, where we lay for the night. During the day there had been constant skirmishing. June 16, at 3 a. m. regiment moved forward and relieved troops in reserve of skirmish line, and built a line of works. Regiment went on picket. Loss this day, 3 men wounded. June 17, at daylight it was discovered that the enemy had abandoned during the night his works in our imme
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
vacuated his works. June 6, moved at 6 a. m. eight miles toward the railroad and bivouacked at 4 p. m. near Lost Mountain. June 7, 8, and 9, remained in same place, men washing and resting. June 10, marched at 11 a. m. through mud and rain three miles and confronted the enemy near Pine Mountain. June 11, occupied in getting into positions, rain falling in such quantities as almost to prevent operations. June 12 and 13, active operations are suspended on account of excessive wet weather. June 14. regiment on picket, nothing of importance transpiring. June 15, the enemy evacuated our front; followed two miles, when we again encountered him behind strong works. June 16, heavy artillery firing, but no movement on our part. June 17, advanced our lines a short distance. June 18, the lines are extended, the One hundred and twenty-fifth moves a short distance to the right and fortifies. June 19, the enemy having evacuated during last night, our lines are advanced two miles, when
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
rest of the corps, moved eastward to the neighborhood of Mount Morris Church. June 7, 8, and 9, the division remained in camp. June 10, the division moved with the corps southward and took position in front of Pine Top Knob. June 11, 12, 13, and 14, remained in this position, constantly skirmishing, with a few casualties daily. Tuesday night, June 14, the enemy evacuated Pine. Top Knob, retiring to his intrenched lines half a mile south of it. Wednesday, June 15, the Second Division of the June 14, the enemy evacuated Pine. Top Knob, retiring to his intrenched lines half a mile south of it. Wednesday, June 15, the Second Division of the corps was ordered to assault the enemy's works, and my division was ordered to support it. However, the assault was not made, and the corps remained in the position of Wednesday afternoon throughout Thursday, June 16, carrying on the usual skirmishing with the enemy. Thursday night the enemy evacuated his lines, crossed Muddy Creek, and swung back toward Kenesaw Mountain. Thus was he forced from his sixth strongly intrenched position. Early Friday morning the Fourth Corps followed up the ene
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 60 (search)
lies, which sent them speedily back to their works. May 30, advanced the line 500 yards to front and right; built breast-works and remained in them May 31, June 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. During the night of the 5th the enemy abandoned his works on our front. June 6, took up line of march in pursuit via Acworth. June 7, 8, 9, remained in camp waiting orders. June 10, marched forward three miles. June 11, took position in line of battle in front of Pine Mountain. June 12, 13, remained in position. June 14, advanced in line of battle and found the enemy's works on Pine Mountain abandoned. June 15 and 16, remained within enemy's works on Pine Mountain. June 17, advanced, deployed as skirmishers, about two miles, encountered the enemy's skirmishers and steadily drove them back to their rifle-pits on the south side of a large open field, then charged across this field and drove the enemy from their rifle-pits, and occupied them with the Eighty-ninth's skirmishers. Casualties, killed, none; wo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
Ga., and remained in camp from June 7 until June 10, when the corps marched toward Pine Mountain. The enemy having been met in force at that place, by General Howard's [order] the Fifth Indiana Battery and Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Light Battery were placed in position near the Marietta road. June 11, Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, was placed in position upon the left front of General Newton's division. General Wood's division being in reserve his batteries were not engaged. June 14, by order of Major-General Howard, the Fifth Indiana, Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania, and Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, opened fire upon Pine Mountain at 11 a. m. June 15, the enemy having evacuated Pine Mountain, Major-General Stanley's division occupied it, placing one section of the Fifth Indiana Battery in position upon Pine Mountain, the remaining two sections and Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery, upon a ridge, midway between Pine and Kenesaw Mountains. June 16, the Fifth
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