hide Matching Documents

Your search returned 857 results in 357 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 149 (search)
remained encamped there till 24th, then marched to Dallas. Placed on skirmish line 27th; lost 3 men killed, 6 wounded, and 2 missing. June 1, marched to the left and relieved One hundred and twentyeighth Indiana near Liberty Church. On the 5th the enemy evacuated their works. Remained. encamped near Acworth till June 10. On 12th Captain Taggart, in consequence of severe illness, was relieved and the undersigned placed in command of the regiment. On skirmish line near Big Shanty on June 14; lost 3 men wounded. On 19th took position in front of Kenesaw Mountain; had 1 man killed. On same line on 23d; had 1 man killed and 1 wounded. On night June 25 changed position to the right, and on 27th participated in assault on enemy's works near Marietta; loss, 1 commissioned officer killed and 2 wounded; enlisted men killed 11, and 33 wounded and 4 missing. Night of July 2 enemy evacuated their works and the regiment marched in pursuit passing through Marietta and taking position
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
untain, and my lines were advanced, but in the afternoon our whole corps was moved about a mile to the left so as to make room for the Fourth Corps to deploy. In my new position I was on the right of our corps, connecting with the Fourth Corps, our First Division on my left. My line faced toward the south and was located about a mile north of the Marietta and Big Shanty road, fronting the northeast end of Pine Mountain. June 12 and 13, no movement took place upon our portion of the line. June 14, our whole line advanced, and my left reached the Big [Shanty] road, where it intrenched. Directly in front on the south side of the road the strongly built lines of the enemy, stretching from the base of Pine Mountain to the east, were discovered at a few hundred yards' distance. My right, nearer to the mountain, was more strongly resisted, and, although skirmishing hotly throughout the day with heavy loss, did not until dark succeed in dislodging the rebels from their rifle-pits or in g
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Resaca. (search)
untain, and my lines were advanced, but in the afternoon our whole corps was moved about a mile to the left so as to make room for the Fourth Corps to deploy. In my new position I was on the right of our corps, connecting with the Fourth Corps, our First Division on my left. My line faced toward the south and was located about a mile north of the Marietta and Big Shanty road, fronting the northeast end of Pine Mountain. June 12 and 13, no movement took place upon our portion of the line. June 14, our whole line advanced, and my left reached the Big [Shanty] road, where it intrenched. Directly in front on the south side of the road the strongly built lines of the enemy, stretching from the base of Pine Mountain to the east, were discovered at a few hundred yards' distance. My right, nearer to the mountain, was more strongly resisted, and, although skirmishing hotly throughout the day with heavy loss, did not until dark succeed in dislodging the rebels from their rifle-pits or in g
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 164 (search)
umpkin Vine Creek, east of Dallas, deployed in one line, and intrenched. The skirmishing was very active during the occupation of this position. The enemy having evacuated on the night of the 6th, the next morning the brigade moved to a point about three miles from Acworth and camped. June 10, moved to a position in front of Pine Mountain. June 11, moved forward and to the left about one and a half miles; formed in line of battle and camped, the skirmishers being engaged with the enemy. June 14, moved one mile south, skirmishing quite sharply with the enemy; lost several men; formed in line of battle and intrenched. June 15, the enemy having left our immediate front, the brigade moved forward about one mile and a quarter and intrenched, the skirmishers being engaged as the advance was made. June 17, the enemy slowly withdrawing, the brigade advanced and took position on a ridge held by the skirmishers, and again intrenched. Enemy's skirmishers made an attack about midnight, cau
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 167 (search)
7, left Ringgold, passing Tunnel Hill, and lay before Rocky Face Mountain until morning of May 12, 1864, when we marched for Resaca by way of Snake Creek Gap. May 13, 14, and 15, participated in operations in Sugar Creek Valley, near Resaca, with loss of 3 men wounded. May 16, engaged in pursuit of enemy, arriving at Kingston May 19. May 23, marched by way of Burnt Hickory, and on June 2, 3, and 4, participated in operations on Pumpkin Vine Creek, near Dallas, with loss of 5 men wounded. June 14, advanced on Kenesaw Mountain, skirmishing with enemy; intrenched ourselves in seven different positions on the enemy's front, the enemy evacuating July 2. Our loss in front of Kenesaw Mountain, 2 officers and 11 men wounded. July 4, took part with our brigade at Marietta, Ga. July 11, 2 a. m., this regiment was ordered to Acworth, but on our arrival, finding all quiet, returned immediately. July 13, rejoined our division at Vining's Station. July 17, crossed Chattahoochee River. July
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 172 (search)
k Infantry and ordered in rear of the Tenth Kentucky Infantry; casualties, 2 men wounded. June 5, rebels evacuated their works in our front at 7 a. m. June 6, moved six miles and camped two miles south of Acworth and near Proctor's Creek. June 10, moved two miles and took position in front of Pine Knob, on left of front line of brigade. June 11, moved one mile southeast and took position on the right of the front line of the brigade, which was then the right of the Fourteenth Army Corps. June 14, at 11 a. m. moved southeast one mile with two companies on the skirmish line, which were hotly engaged till night; casualties of the regiment, 9 men wounded. June 15, advanced one mile and took position on right of rear line of brigade, which was on the right of the Fourteenth Army Corps; casualties, 1 man killed and 3 wounded, 1 mortally. June 17, rebels evacuated all their works on our right of the center of the Fourteenth Army Corps: heavy skirmishing all day; casualty, 1 man killed.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
son's (Blair's) left and Garrard's. 7 a. m., Generals Stanley and Newton report no change in their front. Enemy keeps up same show as yesterday. Rained all day. No change of importance in our lines. Nothing new. Only little picket-firing. June 14.-5.30, general and staff started out to ride the lines. 9 a. m., ordered Generals Newton and Wood, through Colonel Sherman, to wheel the line to the right, conforming to the movement of General Baird, of Palmer's corps, who was to move forward ces, and the left swung up three-fourths of a mile toward Pine Top Mountain. Had heavy skirmishing during the day. Day clear and cool. June 15.-3 a. m., received Special Field Orders, No. 25, for movements to-morrow (to-day, June 15), dated June 14, headquarters Military Division of the Mississippi. For full text of orders (here omitted) see Part IV, 6.20 a. m., word was received from General Newton that the enemy had evacuated his front and that his skirmishers had advanced half a mile.
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 13 (search)
P. M. He had sent a despatch from Bermuda Hundred to Washington, giving briefly the situation of the army and the progress of the movement. That afternoon reports were received showing pretty definitely Lee's present position; for Grant, with the energy and system which he never failed to employ in securing prompt information regarding his opponent's movements, had had Lee's operations closely watched. The work of laying the great pontoon-bridge across the James began after 4 P. M. on June 14, and was finished by eleven o'clock that night. It was twenty-one hundred feet in length, and required one hundred and one pontoons. The pontoons, which were in the channel of the river, where the water was swift and deep, were attached to vessels that were anchored above and below for this purpose. Admiral Lee's fleet took position in the river, and assisted in covering the passage of the troops. Hancock began to move his corps on ferry-boats on the 14th, and before daylight on the mor
brought forward. The force of Beauregard was less than 45,ooo men. He estimated that of the enemy between 8^,000 to 9 r,000. General Beauregard being unable to hold Corinth, commenced the removal of his sick preparatory to an evacuation on May 26th, and on the next day arrangements were made for falling back on the 29th. The evacuation was complete, not only the army but every piece of ordnance was withdrawn. The retreat was continued to Tupelo, the enemy not interfering. On June 14th orders were sent to General Bragg from Richmond to proceed to Jackson, Miss., and temporarily to assume command of the department then under the command of General Lovell. The order concluded as follows: After General Magruder joins, your further services there may be dispensed with. The necessity is urgent and absolute. Jefferson Davis. On application to General Beauregard for the necessary orders, he replied: You cannot possibly go. My health does not permit me to remain in
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 67: the tortures inflicted by General Miles. (search)
ed by unmerited insult heaped on helplessness but the perpetrators. The day would come when our people would be ashamed of his treatment. For himself, the sufferings he was undergoing would do him good with his people (the South). Even those who had opposed him would be kept silent, if not won over, by public sympathy. Whatever other opinions might be held, it was clear he was selected as chief victim, bearing the burden of Northern hatred which should be more equally distributed. June 14th. Would be glad to have a few volumes on the conchology, geology, or botany of the South, and was at a loss to think how such volumes could endanger his safekeeping. June 18th. Mr. Davis said: One of the features of the proposition submitted by General Sherman was a declaration of amnesty to all persons, both civil and military. Notice being called to the fact particularly, Sherman said, I mean just that; and gave his reason that it was the only way to have perfect peace. He had p
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...