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Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 16 16 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 15 15 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 15 15 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 15 15 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 15 15 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 15 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 14 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 13 13 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 13 13 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for October or search for October in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), College settlements, (search)
e in 1867 when Edward Denison, a graduate of Oxford University, went to live in the East End of London that he might study the grievances of the poor, and do educational work among them. A similar work was done by Arnold Toynbee, whose labors led to his death in 1883, but whose efforts and name were perpetuated by the establishment on Jan. 10, 1885, of Toynbee Hall, in Whitechapel, East London, and afterwards of Oxford Hall. The first college settlement in the United States was founded in New York City in the fall of 1889, by the graduates of several women's colleges. The building, at No. 95 Rivington Street, is located in one of the most crowded tenement districts of the East Side. On May 14, 1891, another settlement was organized in New York by the graduates of Yale, Columbia, Princeton, and other colleges. In October of the same year the graduates of Andover Theological Seminary and other ex-collegians began a similar work in the tenement district of Boston. See Addams, Jane.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Columbian Exposition. (search)
propriated $1,500,000 towards providing for the successful management of the enterprise. A commission of two persons from each State and Territory was appointed by the President on the nomination of the governors, and also eight commissioners at large, and two from the District of Columbia, to constitute the World's Columbian Commission. It was directed that the buildings should be dedicated Oct. 12, 1892. The exposition was to be opened on May 1, 1893, and closed on the last Thursday of October in the same year. In connection with the exposition a naval review was directed to be held in New York Harbor in April, 1893, and the President was authorized to extend to foreign nations an invitation to send ships of war to join the United States navy at Hampton Roads and proceed thence to the review. The national commission being chosen, the President appointed ex-Senator Thomas W. Palmer, of Michigan, to be permanent chairman, and John T. Dickinson, of Texas, permanent secretary. Col
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Columbus, Christopher 1435-1536 (search)
ish monarchs were engaged with the Moors in Granada, during which time Columbus served in the army as a volunteer. Meanwhile the King of Portugal had invited him (1488) to return, and Henry VII. had also invited him by letter to come to the Court of England, giving him encouraging promises of aid. But Ferdinand and Isabella treated him kindly, and he remained in Spain until 1491, when he set out to lay his projects before Charles VIII. of France. On his way, at the close of a beautiful October day, he stopped at the gate of the Franciscan monastery of Santa Maria de Rabida, near the port of Palos, in Andalusia, and asked for refreshment for his boy, Diego. The prior of the convent, Juan Perez de Marchena, became interested in the conversation of the stranger, and he invited him to remain as his guest. To him Columbus unfolded his plans. Alonzo Pinzon and other eminent navigators at Palos, with scientific men, were invited to the convent to confer with Columbus, and Pinzon offe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Crook, George -1890 (search)
Military officer; born near Dayton, O., Sept. 8, 1828; graduated at West Point in 1852. In May, 1861, he was promoted to captain. He did good service in western Virginia, and in September was made brigadiergeneral and took command of the Kanawha district. In command of a division of cavalry in the Army of the Cumberland, he was at Chickamauga (q. v.) and drove Wheeler across the Tennessee. Brevetted major-general of volunteers (July, 1864), he was put in command of the Army of West Virginia, and took part in Sheridan's operations in the Shenandoah Valley. He was made major-general of volunteers in October, and late in February, 1865, was captured by guerillas, but exchanged the next month. He was brevetted brigadier-general and major-general in the regular Army March 13, 1865, and afterwards distinguished himself in several campaigns against the Indians, and particularly in the battles of Powder River, Tongue River, and the Rosebud. He died in Chicago, Ill., March 21, 1890.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dickinson, Phiilemon, 1739- (search)
Dickinson, Phiilemon, 1739- Military officer; born in Croisedore, Md., April 5, 1739; settled near Trenton, N. J. In July, 1775, he entered the patriot army; in October of the same year was promoted brigadiergeneral; in 1776 was a delegate to the Provincial Congress of New Jersey; in 1777 was promoted major-general of the New Jersey troops; in October of that year marched against the British on Staten Island, for which he received the thanks of Washington; and served with marked distinctiof the same year was promoted brigadiergeneral; in 1776 was a delegate to the Provincial Congress of New Jersey; in 1777 was promoted major-general of the New Jersey troops; in October of that year marched against the British on Staten Island, for which he received the thanks of Washington; and served with marked distinction during the remainder of the Revolutionary War. In 1784 he served on the commission to choose a site for the city of Washington. He died near Trenton, N. J., Feb. 4, 1809.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dix, John Adams, 1798-1879 (search)
eply to an inquiry addressed to General Dix at the close of August, 1873, he responded as follows from his country residence: Seafield, West Haven, N. Y, Sept. 21, 1873. Your favor is received. The order alluded to was written by myself, without any suggestion from any one, and it was sent off three days before it was communicated to the President or cabinet. Mr. Stanton's letter to Mr. Bonner, of the Ledger, stating that it was wholly mine, was published in the New York Times last October or late in September, to silence forever the misrepresentations in regard to it. After writing it (about seven o'clock in the evening), I gave it to Mr. Hardy, a clerk in the Treasury Department, to copy. The copy was signed by me, and sent to the telegraph office the same evening, and the original was kept, like all other original despatches. It is now, as you state, in possession of my son, Rev. Dr. Dix, No. 27 West Twenty-fifth street, New York. It was photographed in 1863 or 1864, an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dollar. (search)
Dollar. Stamped Spanish dollars (value 4s. 9d.) were issued from the British mint in March, 1797, but called in in October following. The dollar is the unit of the United States money. It is coined in silver, formerly also in gold, and is worth 4s. 1/4d. English money. See coinage.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Drama, early American. (search)
Drama, early American. As early as 1733, there appears to have been a sort of theatrical performance in the city of New York. In October of that year, George Talbot, a merchant, published a notice in Bradford's Gazette, directing inquiries to be made at his store next door to the Play-house. In 1750 some young Englishmen and Americans got up a coffee-house representation of Otway's Orphans in Boston. The pressure for entrance to the novelty was so great that a disturbance arose, which gave the authorities reason for taking measures for the suppression of such performances. At the next session of the legislature a law was made prohibiting theatrical entertainments, because, as it was expressed in the preamble, they tended not only to discourage industry and frugality, but likewise greatly to increase immorality, impiety, and a contempt for religion. Regular theatrical performances were introduced into America soon afterwards, when, in 1752, a company of actors from London, l
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Envoys to France. (search)
esident Adams, observing the perilous relations between the United States and France, called an extraordinary session of Congress to consider the matter. There had been a reaction among the people, and many leading Democrats favored war with France. A majority of the cabinet advised further negotiations, and John Marshall, a Federalist, and Elbridge Gerry, a Democrat, were appointed envoys extraordinary to join Pinckney and attempt to settle all matters in dispute. They reached France in October (1797), and sought an audience with the Directory. Their request was met by a haughty refusal, unless the envoys would first agree to pay into the exhausted French treasury a large sum of money, in the form of a loan, by the purchase of Dutch bonds wrung from that nation by the French, and a bribe to the amount of $240,000 for the private use of the five members of the Directory. The proposition came semi-officially from Talleyrand, one of the most unscrupulous politicians of the age. It
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fredericksburg, battle at. (search)
emy should he attempt to recross into Maryland. The government and the loyal people, impatient of delay, demanded an immediate advance. On Oct. 6 the President instructed McClellan to cross the Potomac and give battle to the enemy, or drive him South. Your army must now move, he said, while the roads are good. Twenty-four days were spent in correspondence before the order was obeyed, McClellan complaining of a lack of men and supplies to make it prudent to move forward. At length, when October had nearly passed by and Lee's army was thoroughly rested and reorganized, and communications with Richmond were re-established, the Army of the Potomac began to cross the river (Oct. 26), 100,000 strong. The Nationals were led on the east side of the Blue Ridge, but failed to strike the retreating Confederates over the mountain in flank or to get ahead of them; and Lee pushed Longstreet's troops over the Blue Ridge to Culpeper Court-house, between the Army of the Potomac and Richmond, rea
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