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, left Marietta at eight o'clock A. M., November fourteenth, to follow our indomitable leaders thro The regiment broke camp at Marietta November fourteenth, moving to the right of Atlanta, and enhe operations of my regiment, from the fourteenth of November to present date. November 14.--MarcNovember 14.--Marched from Mitchell's Cross-Roads, to join the division at Turner's Ferry, on the Chattahoochee Riveries in the Ninth Michigan cavalry, from November fourteenth to December seventeenth, 1864: Adjutlunteers, mounted infantry, from the fourteenth day of November to the nineteenth day of December, 1ember 261EngineDestroyed at, Waynesboro, Ga. Nov. 14 to Dec. 1414,070Bales cottonBurned during the campaign. Nov. 14 to Dec. 1412,900Bales cornBurned during the campaign. Nov. 14 to Dec. 1480Tons. 1436Grist-millsBurned during the campaign. Nov. 14 to Dec. 1427Saw-millsBurned during the campai 14271Cotton-ginsBurned during the campaign. Nov. 14 to Dec. 14160HidesBurned during the campaign.[9 more...]
ga fortified was taken. Chattanooga fortified in 1864 Chattanooga and the military bridge he disabled the gunboats to such an extent that they were burned to prevent their falling into his hands. The fire spread to the Federal stores on the levee and $1,500,000 of Government property thereby was destroyed. The garrison held firm. Forrest withdrew his troops and crossed the river above the town. He had received orders to join Hood as quickly as possible and reached Florence on November 14th. General Hood was now free to invade Tennessee. Sherman had sent the Fourth Corps, under Stanley, and the Twenty-third, under Schofield, the latter in command of both, back to Thomas, and this force was now at Pulaski to oppose Hood. On the morning of November 19th, the army of Hood was put in motion. The day was disagreeable. It snowed and rained, and there was sleet and ice for the men to face. Over the slippery roads the army trudged, led by the cavalry of the daring Forrest.
ga fortified was taken. Chattanooga fortified in 1864 Chattanooga and the military bridge he disabled the gunboats to such an extent that they were burned to prevent their falling into his hands. The fire spread to the Federal stores on the levee and $1,500,000 of Government property thereby was destroyed. The garrison held firm. Forrest withdrew his troops and crossed the river above the town. He had received orders to join Hood as quickly as possible and reached Florence on November 14th. General Hood was now free to invade Tennessee. Sherman had sent the Fourth Corps, under Stanley, and the Twenty-third, under Schofield, the latter in command of both, back to Thomas, and this force was now at Pulaski to oppose Hood. On the morning of November 19th, the army of Hood was put in motion. The day was disagreeable. It snowed and rained, and there was sleet and ice for the men to face. Over the slippery roads the army trudged, led by the cavalry of the daring Forrest.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 4.21 (search)
by the same tedious process as yesterday. Breakfast for the officers consisted of two slices of loaf bread, and some black, but very weak coffee, minus sugar and cream. The privates had only one slice of bread and cup of coffee. How wistfully the brave fellows looked at our two pieces of bread, as they snatched up and quickly ate their single slice. The true heroes of this war are the brave, self-denying, illy fed and poorly clad Confederate privates. All honor to them! November 13th, 14th and 15th A new batch of wounded prisoners came in from Winchester. Among the officers are Major Geo. H. Kyle, of Baltimore, A. D. C. to General Breckinridge, wounded in the stomach and both arms; Captain M. Russell, Sixtieth Georgia, right arm amputated near the shoulder; Captain J. G. Rankin, Thirty-eighth Georgia, wounded in the arm; Lieutenant S. R. Murphy, Thirty-first Georgia, wounded in mouth and cheek; Lieutenant J. P. Arrington, formerly of Fifth Alabama, A. D. C. to General Rodes
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lookout mountain — report of General John K. Jackson. (search)
e division was then on duty at or near the Cravens house. General Moore was in command of that portion of the line, under General Walker's orders, from 10th to 14th November. The command I found General Walker exercising — extending over all the troops west of Chattanooga creek — was under the general supervision of Lieutenant-Genant-General Hardee, until his headquarters were removed from the extreme right of the army to a point a little east of Chattanooga creek. This was about the 14th of November. About this time I went to the top of the mountain with Lieutenant-General Hardee. We there met General Bragg, and after a view from Lookout point, Gener. The engineers were put to work under some one's orders, whose I do not know, and fatigue parties furnished to them from my command at their request. On the 14th November a new disposition of the command was made. Major-General Stevenson was assigned to the command of the troops and defences on the top of Lookout mountain. The
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 8.70 (search)
s, and in May, 1855, was transferred, with the same rank, to the First Cavalry regiment, which was organized at Jefferson Barracks, near St. Louis, and was afterwards moved to Fort Leavenworth, at which post Stuart was appointed regimental quartermaster and commissary. In September and October of this year, the First Cavalry was engaged in an expedition against the Indians which entailed severe marching but no fighting. Returning to Leavenworth, Stuart was married at Fort Riley, on the 14th November, to Miss Flora Cooke, daughter of Colonel Philip St. George Cooke, commandant of that post. In December, 1855, he received promotion to be first lieutenant in his regiment. During a large part of the three following years, Stuart's regiment was engaged in the attempt to preserve peace between the new settlers in Kansas Territory, during that exciting period when it was yet undetermined whether Kansas should be a free or a slave state. It was amid these stirring scenes that he made tha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
L. Christian the Association passed an appropriate tribute to the memory of this gallant soldier and distinguished citizen. In response to calls General Fitz Lee, Colonel R. E. Withers, and General Wm. Smith made stirring speeches. The officers of last year were unanimously re-elected. General Fitzhugh Lee expects to leave Richmond on Monday, November the 13th, to meet engagements to repeat, for the benefit of the Society, his superb lecture on Chancellorsville at Darlington, November 14th, Charleston, November, 16th, Atlanta, November 18th, Savannah, November 22d, Augusta, November 24th, and Rome, November 28th. Returning home from this latter point for a few days, General Lee will then repeat his lecture in Montgomery, Mobile, New Orleans, Galveston, and other points in Texas. We doubt not that our friends everywhere will appreciate this labor of love, and give our gallant friend, General Fitz, a royal greeting wherever he may go, while we can assure those who may be
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 6: (search)
ived in good order, took post before morning, receiving supplies from Chattanooga, and offering the enemy battle during all the next day, and repulsing his reconnoissance. On the night of the 21st we withdrew from Rossville, took firm possession of the objective point of our campaign—Chattanooga—and prepared to hold it. Coming down to the time when Rosecrans had been relieved, and General Thomas was in command in Chattanooga, General Sherman, in writing of his own arrival there on November 14th, and a conversation with General Grant the next day, represents the latter as informing him that forage and provisions were then extremely scarce, and that he feared Thomas' troops could not be drawn out of the trenches for a fight. That General Grant could not have made such a statement about supplies is evident from the following dispatches sent more than two weeks before Sherman's arrival: headquarters Military division of the Mississippi, Chattanooga, October 26, 1863. Maj
ommand and a few militia, held the enemy in check for two or three days. With his small force, General Wheeler daringly and persistently harassed, and, when practicable, delayed the enemy's advance, attacking and defeating exposed detachments, deterring his foragers from venturing far from the main body, defending all cities and towns along the railroad lines and affording protection to depots of supplies, arsenals, and other important government works. The report of his operations from November 14th to December 20th displays a dash, activity, vigilance, and consummate skill which justly entitle him to a prominent place on the roll of great cavalry leaders. By his indomitable energy, operating on all sides of Sherman's columns, he was enabled to keep the government and commanders of our troops advised of the enemy's movements, and, by preventing foraging parties from leaving the main body, he saved from spoilation all but a narrow tract of country, and from the torch millions worth
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 19: battle of Chickamauga (search)
following table gives the Confederate casualties of the campaign. Those of the unfortunate assault on Fort Sanders, badly begun, suspended by mistake, and never concluded, are shown separately below. Return of casualties, Longstreet's corps,Nov. 14 to Dec. 4, 1863 DIVISIONBRIGADEKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTALDATE Hood'sJenkins221095136Nov. 4 to Dec. 5 Hood'sBenning156Nov. 4 to Dec. 5 Hood'sRobertson918633Nov. 4 to Dec. 5 Hood'sLaw1569892Nov. 4 to Dec. 5 Hood'sAnderson35760Nov. 17 and 18 138Nov. 17 and 18 Total McLaws's Division115463204782 Aggregate1988502481296 Loss in the assault on Fort Sanders, Nov. 29: killed, 129; wounded, 458; missing, 226; total, 813, included in the above. Return of casualties, Burnside's command, Nov. 14 to Dec. 4, 1863 DIVISIONBRIGADEKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGTOTAL 9th Corps 1st Div. Morrison519630 Christ15252464 Humphreys1810246166 Artillery22 Total3814876262 9th Corps 2d Div. Sigfried5273264 Schall47314 Artillery11 Total9353579 Total 9
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