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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXIX. August, 1863 (search)
ons will consist of our bravest men, who will make efficient soldiers in a month. If our armies be not broken before October, no doubt the tide of success will turn again fully in our favor. Major Wm. Norris, Signal Corps, reports that many transports and troops have been going down from Washington and Annapolis to Fortress Monroe during the whole week, and that 5000 men embarked at Fortress Monroe, on Monday, for (as they said themselves) Charleston. Among these was a negro regiment of 1300. T. C. Reynolds, confidential agent of the government in the trans- Mississippi States, sends copy of a circular letter from Lieut.-Gen. Kirby Smith to the representative men of Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas, to meet him in convention, 15th August, at Marshall, Texas. Mr Reynolds says he and others will exert themselves to prevent the meeting from taking a dangerous political direction. Gen. Smith is popular, and opposed to the States named setting up for themselves, although
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXX. September, 1863 (search)
abundance of powder. The ammunition and small arms turned over to the enemy, on the surrender, consisted as follows: 36,000 cartridges for Belgian rifles; 3600 Brunswick cartridges; 75,000 rounds British rifled muskets; 9000 shot-gun cartridges; 1300 Maynard cartridges; 5000 Hall's carbine cartridges; 1200 holster pistol cartridges; 35,000 percussion caps; 19,000 pounds of cannon powder. All this was in the ordnance depots, and exclusive of that in the hands of the troops and in the ordnane for the sequel of the battle; for Rosecrans has fallen back toga strong position; and at this distance we know not whether it be practicable to flank him or to cut his communications. It is said Gen. Breckinridge commanded only 1600 men, losing 1300 of them! Gen. Cooper and the Secretary of War have not been permitted to fill up his division; the first probably having no desire to replenish the dilapidated command of an aspiring political general. A Mr. G. Preston Williams, of Eden, Chath
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
is chief, though the interests of the cause depended largely on the movement of the latter. The forces engaged at Gettysburg were: Confederate.-According to the latest official accounts, the Army of Northern Virginia, on the 31st of May, numbered 74,468. The detachments that joined numbered 6400, making 80,868. Deducting the detachments left in Virginia,--Jenkins's brigade, Pickett's division, 2300; Corse's brigade, Pickett's division, 1700; detachments from Second Corps and of cavalry, 1300, in all 5300,leaves the actual aggregate 75,568. Union.-According to the reports of the 30th of June, and making allowance for detachments that joined in the interim in time to take part in the battle, the grand aggregate was 100,000 General Meade's monthly return for June 30 shows 99,131 present for duty, equipped. The Comte de Paris estimates the force actually on the field, including the Sixth Corps, which was in reserve, at 82,000. officers and men. The Confederates lost many m
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.38 (search)
e loss: k, 20; w, 177; m, 2 = 199. Schenck's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. C. Schenck: 55th Ohio, Col. John C. Lee; 82d Ohio, Col. James Cantwell; 5th W. Va., Col. John L. Zeigler; 1st Battalion Conn. Cav., Maj. Judson M. Lyon; K, 1st Ohio Art'y, Capt. William L. De Beck. Brigade loss (82d Ohio): k, 6; w, 50; m, 1=57. Total loss: killed, 26; wounded, 227; missing, 3 = 256. General Schenck says ( Official Records, XII., Pt. I., pp. 462, 463), that he brought into the field an aggregate of only 1300 infantry, besides De Beck's battery . . . and about 250 of the 1st Battalion Connecticut Cavalry. . . . Adding to the 1768 of Milroy's brigade about 500 of the 82d Ohio, which was the number in action, the entire force we had engaged was 2268. Banks's command, May 23d-25th 1862. Major-General Nathaniel P. Banks. first division, Brig.-Gen. Alpheus S. Williams. First Brigade, Col. Dudley Donnelly: 5th Conn., Lieut.-Col. George D. Chapman; 28th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Edwin F. Brown; 46th Pa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Union Army. (search)
e loss: k, 20; w, 177; m, 2 = 199. Schenck's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. C. Schenck: 55th Ohio, Col. John C. Lee; 82d Ohio, Col. James Cantwell; 5th W. Va., Col. John L. Zeigler; 1st Battalion Conn. Cav., Maj. Judson M. Lyon; K, 1st Ohio Art'y, Capt. William L. De Beck. Brigade loss (82d Ohio): k, 6; w, 50; m, 1=57. Total loss: killed, 26; wounded, 227; missing, 3 = 256. General Schenck says ( Official Records, XII., Pt. I., pp. 462, 463), that he brought into the field an aggregate of only 1300 infantry, besides De Beck's battery . . . and about 250 of the 1st Battalion Connecticut Cavalry. . . . Adding to the 1768 of Milroy's brigade about 500 of the 82d Ohio, which was the number in action, the entire force we had engaged was 2268. Banks's command, May 23d-25th 1862. Major-General Nathaniel P. Banks. first division, Brig.-Gen. Alpheus S. Williams. First Brigade, Col. Dudley Donnelly: 5th Conn., Lieut.-Col. George D. Chapman; 28th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Edwin F. Brown; 46th Pa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
f Buell's forces toward Chattanooga seriously threatened his department. Map of North Mississippi and West Tennessee. Map of the Corinth and Iuka region. General Bragg recognized the inadequacy of General Smith's force, and on June 27th he transferred the division commanded by Major-General John P. McCown from. Tupelo to Chattanooga. General Kirby Smith, in a letter dated July 14th, 1862, estimated Stevenson's division at 10,000, Heth's and McCown's at 10,000, Morgan's cavalry 1300. Official Records, Vol. XVI., Pt. II., p. 727.--editors. Forrest and John H. Morgan had already been sent into middle Tennessee and Kentucky, and the operations of these enterprising officers materially lessened the pressure upon General Smith. Correspondence between Generals Bragg and Smith resulted in an order, dated July 21st, transferring the entire Army of Mississippi to Chattanooga. To mislead the enemy and to prevent an advance upon Tupelo, Bragg had, on the 19th, sent Colonel Josep
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
sted. The whole attacking squadron now slowly withdrew from an engagement which had lasted not more than two hours and twenty-five minutes, but which had been, for the enemy, a most disastrous defeat. The following are extracts from reports of officers in command or on duty that day. Colonel Rhett said: The enemy's fire was mostly ricochet and not very accurate; most of their shot passed over the fort, and several to the right and left. The greater portion of their shots were from 1300 to 1400 yards distant, which appeared to be the extent of their effective range. Some shots were from a greater distance, and did not reach the fort at all. General Ripley said: The action was purely of artillery,--forts and batteries against the iron-clad vessels of the enemy,--other means of defense, obstructions and torpedoes, not having come into play. Fort Sumter was the principal object of the attack, and to that garrison . . . special credit is due for sustaining the shock,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The army before Charleston in 1863. (search)
armed front about 800 feet in length reaching entirely across the island, while our advance must be made over a strip of low shifting sand only about 80 feet wide, and two feet above the range of ordinary tides. Between the 16th and 18th of July, as preliminary to a second attempt to get possession of Battery Wagner by assault, 41 pieces of artillery, comprising light rifles and siege-mortars, were put in position on an oblique line across the island at distances from the fort ranging from 1300 to 1900 yards. The rifles were intended principally to dismount the enemy's guns. Early in the afternoon of the 18th all these batteries opened fire, and the navy closed in on the fort and took an active and efficient part in the engagement. In a short time the work became absolutely silent on the faces looking toward us, and practically so on the sea front, from which at the beginning of the action a severe fire had been delivered against the fleet. The work was silenced for the time at l
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The cavalry fight at Trevilian Station. (search)
oward Gordonsville. Besides his own division Hampton had Fitzhugh Lee's, consisting of Wickham's and Lomax's brigades, and this division was in our rear, toward Louisa Court House. On the night of the 10th my orders were to be prepared the next morning at daylight for action. Accordingly at the dawn of day we were mounted and drawn up in column of regiments, prepared with the usual supply of ammunition, etc., for immediate action. It may be well to state just here that my brigade, about 1300 strong, was armed with long-range Enfield rifles, and was, in fact, mounted infantry, but for our sabers. General Rosser rode down to my bivouac about sunrise and inquired if I was informed of what we were to do, to which I replied that I knew nothing except the orders above recited, to be prepared for action at daylight, and that I was awaiting instructions. Whereupon he proposed that we ride to General Hampton's headquarters at Netherland's house, about half a mile below Trevilian, and,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
front; then his brave men, at a run, passed the ravine and secured the ridge. Here Logan intrenched his corps; and Dodge, abreast of him, did the same. Afterward, McPherson seized another piece of ground across Camp Creek, and held it. During the evening of the 14th a vigorous effort was made by Polk to regain this outpost, but he was repulsed with loss. The detailed account gives great credit to Generals Charles R. Woods, Giles A. Smith, and J. A. J. Lightburn. One hundred prisoners and 1300 Confederates hors de combat were on Logan's list. This work forced Johnston to lay a, new bridge over the Oostenaula. The divisions of Absalom Baird, R. W. Johnson, Jefferson C. Davis, and John Newton plunged into the thickets and worked their way steadily and bravely into the reentrant angles on Hardee's front. Schofield's right division, under Judah, had a fearful struggle, losing six hundred men; the others, coming to its help, captured and secured a part of the enemy's intrenchments.
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