Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1767 AD or search for 1767 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), O'Dell, Jonathan 1737-1818 (search)
O'Dell, Jonathan 1737-1818 Clergyman; born in Newark, N. J., Sept. 25, 1737; graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1754; took holy orders in 1767, and became pastor of the Episcopal Church in Burlington, N. J. During the Revolution he was in frequent conflict with the patriots in his parish, and at the close of the war he went to England, but returned to America and settled in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia. He died in Fredericton, N. B., Nov. 25, 1818.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Parliament, English (search)
chy and confusion. Mr. Burke asked leave to bring in a bill for composing the troubles in America, and for quieting the minds of the colonists. He believed concession to be the true path to pursue to reach the happy result. He proposed a renunciation of the exercise of taxation, but not the right; to preserve the power of laying duties for the regulation of commerce, but the money raised was to be at the disposal of the several general assemblies. He proposed to repeal the tea duty of 1767, and to proclaim a general amnesty. His speech on that occasion embraced every consideration of justice and expediency, and warned ministers that if they persisted in vexing the colonies they would drive the Americans to a separation from the mother-country. The plan was rejected. Mr. Luttrell proposed to ask the King to authorize commissioners to receive proposals for conciliation from any general convention of Americans, or their Congress, as the most effectual means for preventing the e
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Perkins, Samuel 1767-1850 (search)
Perkins, Samuel 1767-1850 Author; born in Lisbon, Conn., in 1767; graduated at Yale College in 1785; studied theology, and for a time preached, but afterwards became a lawyer. His publications included History of the political and military events of the late War between the United States and Great Britain; General Jackson's conduct in the Seminole War; and Historical sketches of the United States, 1815-30. He died in Windham, Conn., in September, 1850. Perkins, Samuel 1767-1850 Author; born in Lisbon, Conn., in 1767; graduated at Yale College in 1785; studied theology, and for a time preached, but afterwards became a lawyer. His publications included History of the political and military events of the late War between the United States and Great Britain; General Jackson's conduct in the Seminole War; and Historical sketches of the United States, 1815-30. He died in Windham, Conn., in September, 1850.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Prevost, Sir George 1767-1816 (search)
Prevost, Sir George 1767-1816 Military officer; born in New York City, May 19, 1767; son of Augustine Prevost; entered the British army in youth, and served with distinction in the military operations in the West Indies, especially at St. Lucia. In January, 1805, he was made a major-general, and in November a baronet. He was second in command at the capture of Martinique (1808), and the same year he became governor of Nova Scotia. He was made lieutenant-general in 1811, and in June of that year he succeeded Sir James Craig as governor of Canada, which office he retained until his return to England, in 1814. He ably defended Canada in the War of 1812-15. With a large force of Wellington's veterans, he invaded New York in September, 1814, and was defeated in battle at Plattsburg on the 11th. The cause of the sudden panic of the British troops at Plattsburg, and their precipitous flight on the night of the battle there (see Plattsburg, battles at), was inexplicable. The Rev
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Reed, Joseph 1741-1785 (search)
Reed, Joseph 1741-1785 Statesman; born in Trenton, N. J., Aug.. 27, 1741; graduated at Princeton in 1757; studied law in London; began practice in Trenton in 1765, and became Secretary of the Province of New Jersey in 1767. He was an active patriot, a member of the committee of correspondence, and, having settled in Philadelphia in 1770, was made president of the first Pennsylvania Convention in January, 1775. He was a delegate to the Second Congress (May, 1775), and went with Washington to Cambridge, in July, as his secretary and aide-de-camp. He was adjutant-general during the campaign of 1776, and was appointed chief-justice of Pennsylvania and also a brigadier-general, in 1777, but declined both offices. Reed was a volunteer in the battles of Brandywine, Germantown, and Monmouth, and in 1778, as a member of Congress, signed the Articles of Confederation. He was president of Pennsylvania from 1778 to 1781, and was chiefly instrumental in the detection of the ill-practices
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Revere, Paul 1735-1818 (search)
oston, Mass., Jan. 1, 1735. Was descended from the Huguenots, and was educated in his father's trade of goldsmith. In the French and Indian War he was at Fort Edward, on the upper Hudson, as a lieutenant of artillery, and on his return he established himself as a goldsmith, and, without instruction, became a copper-plate engraver. He was one of four engravers in America when the Revolutionary War broke out. He had engraved, in 1766, a print emblematic of the repeal of the Stamp Act, and in 1767 another called The seventeen Rescinders. He published a print of the Boston massacre, in 1770, and from that time became one of the most active opponents of the acts of Parliament. Revere engraved the plates, made the press, and printed the bills of credit, or paper money, of Massachusetts, issued in 1775; he also engraved the plates for the Continental money. He was sent by the Sons of Liberty, of Boston, to confer with their brethren in New York and Philadelphia. Early in 1775 the Provi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Richard, Gabriel 1767-1832 (search)
Richard, Gabriel 1767-1832 Clergyman; born in Saintes, France, Oct. 15, 1767; educated at Angers; ordained priest in Paris in 1790; emigrated to America in 1792, where he labored as a missionary in Illinois and Michigan. On the outbreak of the War of 1812 he was an ardent sympathizer with the Americans. The British captured and imprisoned him until the close of the war, when he returned to Michigan. In 1807, as there was no Protestant minister in Detroit, the governor and other Protestants requested Father Gabriel to preach to them in English, avoiding all controversy. Father Gabriel accepted the invitation, and preached acceptably to his hearers. In 1823 he was elected delegate to the national House of Representatives from the Territory of Michigan. At the time of his election he was in jail, having been unable to pay a fine which had been imposed on him for defamation of character. He had excommunicated one of his parishioners, who sued him for defamation of character an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Riedesel, Baron Frederick Adolph 1738-1800 (search)
Riedesel, Baron Frederick Adolph 1738-1800 Military officer: born in Lauterbach, Rhine-Hesse, Germany. June 3, 1738. Leaving the College of Marburg, he entered the English army as ensign, and served in the Seven Years War under Prince Ferdinand. In 1760 he became captain of the Hessian Hussars, and was made lieutenant-colonel of the Black Hussars in 1762, adjutant-general of the Brunswick army in 1767, colonel of carabineers in 1772, and a major-general, with the command of a division of 4,000 Brunswickers, hired by the British Court to fight British subject in America early in 1776. Riedesel arrived at Quebec June 1, 1776; aided in the capture of Ticonderoga (July 6), and in dispersing the American troops at Hubbardton, and was made a prisoner with Burgoyne; was exchanged in the fall of 1780; returned home in August, 1783, and was made lieutenant-general in command of troops serving in Holland in 1787. He became commander-in-chief of the military of Brunswick. He died in B
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sewall, Jonathan 1728- (search)
Sewall, Jonathan 1728- Lawyer; born in Boston, Mass., Aug. 24. 1728: graduated at Harvard College in 1748, and in early life was the intimate associate and friend of John Adams. Like Adams, he was a school-teacher; became a lawyer in 1767; and was appointed attorney-general of Massachusetts. In 1769 he began a suit for the freedom of a negro slave, and was successful, two years before the settlement of the case of the negro Somerset, which Blackstone commended so highly, and Cowper commemorated in poetry. He and Adams finally differed in politics, Sewall taking sides with the crown. When the Revolutionary War broke out, he was residing in the house, at Cambridge, which Washington afterwards occupied as his headquarters, for Sewall went to England, and was among the proscribed in Massachusetts in 1779. In 1788 he removed to St. John, N. B., where he was judge of the admiralty court until his death, Sept. 26, 1796.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Susquehanna settlers. (search)
oon on Oct. 14 they attacked and massacred thirty of the settlers in the fields. Men, women, and children fled to the mountains, from which they saw their homes plundered and burned and their cattle taken away. They made their way back to Connecticut. The settlement was broken up. Meanwhile Pennsylvania took possession of the Wyoming Valley and built a fortified trading-house there. Another Connecticut association, called the Delaware Company, had begun a settlement on the Delaware River (1767). In 1769 forty pioneers of the Susquehanna Company went there to assert their rights, and civil war prevailed there for some time (see Pennymite and Yankee War). In 1771 the Assembly of Connecticut proposed to make an effort to adjust all the difficulties, but the governor of Pennsylvania refused to enter into any negotiation. The Connecticut Assembly then made out a case and sent it to England for adjudication. It was submitted to the ablest lawyers in the realm, and was decided in favor
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