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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1767 AD or search for 1767 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tea in politics. (search)
Tea in politics. Among other articles imported into the colonies upon which a duty was laid, in 1767, was tea, the furnishing of which, for England and her colonies, was a monopoly of the East India Company. In consequence of the violent manifestation of opposition to this method of taxation, and especially of the serious effects upon British trade by the operations of the non-importation league, Lord North, then prime minister, offered a bill in Parliament, in the spring of 1770, for the repeal of the duties upon every article enumerated, excepting tea. He thought, unwisely, that tea, being a luxury, the colonists would not object to paying the very small duty imposed upon it, and he retained that simply as a standing assertion of the right of Parliament to tax the colonists. It was a fatal mistake. The bill became a law April 2, 1770. The minister mistook the character and temper of the Americans. It was not the petty amount of duties imposed, for none of this species of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Townshend, George 1724- (search)
Townshend, George 1724- First Marquis, military officer; born in Norfolk, England, Feb. 28, 1724; commanded a division under Wolfe in the expedition against Quebec, and took command of the army after the death of that general, receiving the capitulation of the French. He then returned to England, and was a member of Parliament ten years (1754-64). He became a field-marshal and privy councillor; was lord-lieutenant of Ireland (1767-72), and was created marquis in October, 1787. He died Sept. 14, 1807.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trumbull, John 1750-1843 (search)
Trumbull, John 1750-1843 Poet; born in Westbury (since Watertown), Conn., April 24, 1750; graduated at Yale College in 1767, having been admitted to the college at the age of seven years, such was his precocity in acquiring learning; but he did not reside there until 1763, on account of delicate health. In 1773 he was admitted to the bar, having been two years a tutor in Yale College. During that time he wrote his first considerable poem, The progress of dulness. He was a warm and active patriot. In 1775 the first canto of his famous poem, McFingal, was published in Philadelphia. The whole work, in four cantos, was published in Hartford in 1782. It is a burlesque epic, in the style of Hudibras, directed against the Tories and other enemies of liberty in America. This famous poem has passed through many editions. After the war, Trumbull, with Humphreys, Barlow, and Lemuel Hopkins, wrote a series of poetic essays entitled American antiquities, pretended extracts from a poe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), California (search)
revolutions in South America; proclamation from Gov. Pablo Vincente de Sola, and preparations for defence......June 23, 1816 Mission of San Rafael founded......Dec. 14, 1817 French Capt. Hippolyte Bouchard ( the pirate Buchar ) appears with two vessels of thirty-eight and twenty-six guns under the flag of Buenos Ayres; his real purpose is unknown, but, after summoning Monterey and other places on the coast to surrender, and pillaging the towns, he sails away......December, 1818 From 1767 up to 1821, California being under Spanish rule, ten governors were appointed by that power. Prom 1822 until 1845, being under Mexican domination, her governors (twelve) were appointed from Mexico. California becomes a province of Mexico under the regency of Don Augustin Iturbide, 1821, and Governor Sola is elected deputy to the new Cortes; Iturbide proclaimed emperor......May 18, 1822 Russians warned to abandon California within six months......Oct. 21, 1822 Iturbide surrenders h
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Minnesota, (search)
under sanction of the United States government, reaching the Mississippi by Sandy Lake, ascends to Cass Lake......July 21, 1820 General Leavenworth reports to the commissioners of the land office that the Indians do not recognize grant to Carver in 1767......1821 First mill in Minnesota, erected under the supervision of the officers of Fort Snelling on the site of Minneapolis......1822 Committee on public lands report to the Senate on Rev. Samuel Peters's claim to the Carver grant of 1767; the original deed not being produced, and for other reasons, it is resolved that the petition be not granted......Jan. 23, 1823 First steamboat to navigate the Mississippi from St. Louis to the Minnesota River, the Virginia, reaches Fort Snelling......May, 1823 An expedition fitted out by government, in charge of Maj. S. H. Long, discovers that Pembina, the fort of the Hudson Bay Company on Red River, is within the United States. Long erects an oak post on the line, raises the United
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pennsylvania, (search)
f equal rights, and a code called the great law was enacted.] Counties of Bucks, Chester, and Philadelphia organized......December, 1682 Penn attends to laying out Philadelphia......December, 1682 Penn meets Lord Baltimore at New Castle to adjust boundary claims between Pennsylvania and Maryland......December, 1682 [Dispute not settled until 1760, when it was referred to two English mathematicians, Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon, who ran the boundary-line due west 244 miles (1763-67) in lat. 39° 43′ 26″; stones erected every mile up to 132, every fifth stone bearing the arms of the Baltimore and Penn families. Resurveyed, 1849. While debating in Congress the Missouri Compromise, in 1820, John Randolph introduced the phrase Mason and Dixon's line, as separating freedom from slavery, or the North from the South; the phrase became at once exceedingly popular.] Penn summons the Assembly to Philadelphia, where changes are made in the frame of government ; and to settle di
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Vesey, Denmark (search)
Vesey, Denmark Conspirator; born of negro parents, presumably about 1767; was bought as a slave in St. Thomas by a sea captain from Charleston, S. C., when fourteen years old. For twenty years he sailed with the latter, acquiring a proficiency in several languages. In 1800 he became free and settled as a carpenter in Charleston, S. C., where he was very popular among the negroes, many of whom he quietly convinced that they had a right to fight for their liberty. Together with Peter Poyas, another negro, he perfected a scheme for an insurrection of the slaves in and around Charleston. Several thousand negroes had quietly organized military companies and were furnished with daggers and pikes. On a fixed date they were to arrive in Charleston, as was the custom of many on Sundays, and upon a signal were to act in concert and seize the forts and the city. This plot was divulged by a negro, who had been urged to join it, on May 25, 1822. The principal conspirators were immediat
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ward, Samuel 1725-1776 (search)
Ward, Samuel 1725-1776 Patriot; born in Newport, R. I., May 27, 1725; was already a man of note when the Revolution occurred. He had acquired a competence in business, and had served in the Assembly of Rhode Island. In 1761 he was made chief-justice, and was twice governor (in 1762 and from 1765 to 1767). He was one of the founders of the Rhode Island College (now Brown University). A firm and persistent patriot, he was regarded as a safe leader and had great influence, and, with Stephen Hopkins, was sent a delegate from Rhode Island to the first Continental Congress in 1774. He was also a member of the second Congress in 1775, in which he usually presided when in committee of the whole. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., March 26, 1776.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Watson, John Tadwell 1748-1826 (search)
Watson, John Tadwell 1748-1826 Military officer; born in London, England, in 1748; entered the 3d Foot Guards in 1767; became lieutenant and captain in 1778. He undertook the destruction of Gen. Francis Marion's brigade in 1781, and after several skirmishes fled to Georgetown. He became colonel in 1783, and general in 1808. He died in Calais, France, June 11, 1826.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Webb, Thomas 1724-1796 (search)
1724; was an officer in the British army; served with the Royal American forces, being wounded at Louisburg and Quebec; became a Methodist in 1765, and was licensed to preach; and was made barrack master at Albany, N. Y., about the same time. In 1767 he went to New York City, and there aided Philip Embury in the work of the Methodist Society. After being retired from the army with the rank of captain, he devoted his time to missionary work in New Jersey, Delaware, and Maryland. In 1767 he eslbany, N. Y., about the same time. In 1767 he went to New York City, and there aided Philip Embury in the work of the Methodist Society. After being retired from the army with the rank of captain, he devoted his time to missionary work in New Jersey, Delaware, and Maryland. In 1767 he established the first Methodist Society in Philadelphia, Pa. He visited England several times, and permanently settled there at the outbreak of the Revolutionary War. He died in Bristol, England, Dec. 20, 1796.
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