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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1794 AD or search for 1794 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Waterbury, David 1722-1801 (search)
Waterbury, David 1722-1801 Military officer; born in Stamford, Conn., Feb. 12, 1722. He took part in the French and Indian War, being present at the battle of Lake George in 1755 and the attack on Ticonderoga in 1758; was with Gen. Richard Montgomery in his campaign against Quebec, in 1775; at the siege of St. John and the surrender of Montreal. On June 3, 1776, he was appointed a brigadiergeneral for the Northern Department by the General Assembly of Connecticut, and assigned to the command of the post at Skeensboro, N. Y., where he remained during the summer of 1776. In the battle of Valcour Bay, Oct. 11, 1776, he was captured with his vessel, the Washington, but was soon exchanged; and during the remainder of the war commanded a brigade under Washington. He was a representative in the General Assembly in 1783, 1794, and 1795. He died in Stamford, Conn., June 29, 1801.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), West, Nathaniel 1794- (search)
West, Nathaniel 1794- Clergyman; born in Ulster, Ireland, in September, 1794; studied theology; ordained in 1820; and labored for many years as a missionary. He came to the United States in 1834, and held pastorates in Meadville, Northeast, Pittsburg, McKeesport, and Philadelphia, Pa., and in Monroe, Mich. At the beginning of the Civil War he was appointed chaplain of the Satterlee United States General Hospital in Philadelphia, where he served till his death, which took place Sept. 2, 1864. He wrote The fugitive slave-law, and History of the United States army General Hospital, West Philadelphia.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whiskey insurrection, the (search)
more formidable was made in the four counties of Pennsylvania west of the Alleghany Mountains. These counties had been chiefly settled by the Scotch-Irish, who were mostly Presbyterians, men of great energy, decision, and restive under the restraints of law and order. A lawless spirit prevailed among them. They converted their rye crops into whiskey, and when the excise laws imposed duties on domestic distilled liquors the people disregarded them. A new excise act, passed in the spring of 1794, was specially unpopular; and when, soon after the adjournment of Congress, officers were sent to enforce the act in the western districts of Pennsylvania they were resisted by the people in arms. The insurrection became general throughout all that region, stimulated by leading men in the community. In the vicinity of Pittsburg many outrages were committed. Buildings were burned, mails were robbed, and government officers were insulted and abused. One officer was stripped of all his cloth
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wilkinson, James 1757- (search)
ard of war, of which Gates was president. Being implicated in Conway's cabal he resigned the secretaryship, and in July, 1779, was made clothier-general to the army. At the close of the war he settled in Lexington, Ky., and engaged in mercantile transactions. In 1791-92 he commanded, as lieutenant-colonel of infantry, an expedition against the Indians on the Wabash, and was made brigadier-general in 1792. He was distinguished in command of the right wing of Wayne's army on the Maumee in 1794. In 1796-98 and 1800-12 he was general-in-chief of the army. In December, 1803, as joint-commissioner with Governor Claiborne, he received Louisiana from the French; and from 1805 to 1807 was governor of Louisiana Territory. Wilkinson remained at the head of the Southern Department until his entanglement with Burr caused him to be court-martialled in 1811, when he was honorably acquitted. In 1812 he was brevetted major-general, United States army, and was made a full major-general in 1813
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wilson, Alexander 1766-1813 (search)
Wilson, Alexander 1766-1813 Ornithologist; born in Paisley, Scotland, July 6, 1766; became a weaver, and wrote verses for the newspapers, and in 1789 peddled two volumes of his poetry through the country. His Watty and Meg, published in 1792, and attributed to Burns, had a sale of 100,000 copies. Being prosecuted for a poetical lampoon, he came to America in 1794, landing at Newcastle, Del. By the advice of William Bartram (q. v.), the botanist, he turned his attention to ornithology. Late in 1804 he made a journey on foot to Niagara Falls, and wrote a poetic account of it. In 1805 he learned the art of etching. He persuaded Bradford, the Philadelphia publisher, to furnish funds for the publication of a work on American ornithology in a superb manner, but it was so expensive that it was not pecuniarily successful. His labors, day and night, upon this great work impaired his health and hastened his death. He had finished seven volumes when he laid aside his implements of lab
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wood-engraving. (search)
Wood-engraving. No department of art in the United States has manifested greater progress towards perfection than engraving on wood, which was introduced by Dr. Alexander Anderson (q. v.) in 1794. Before that time engravings to be used typographically were cut on typemetal, and were very rude. As a specimen of the state of the art in the United States when Anderson introduced wood, a facsimile is here given of the frontispiece to the fourteenth edition of Webster's Spelling-book, issued in 1791. It is a portrait of Washington, then President of the United States. This was executed on type-metal. When Anderson's more beautiful works on wood appeared, he was employed by Webster's publishers to make new designs and engravings for the Spelling-book, and the designs then made were used for many years.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Worth, William Jenkins 1794-1849 (search)
Worth, William Jenkins 1794-1849 Military officer; born in Hudson, N. Y., March 1, 1794; began life as a clerk in a store at Hudson, and entered the military service, as lieutenant of infantry, in May, 1813. He was highly distinguished in the battles of Chippewa and at Lundy's Lane, in July, 1814, and was severely wounded in the latter contest. He was in command of cadets at West Point from 1820 to 1828, and in 1838 was made colonel of the 8th United States Infantry. He served in the S1794; began life as a clerk in a store at Hudson, and entered the military service, as lieutenant of infantry, in May, 1813. He was highly distinguished in the battles of Chippewa and at Lundy's Lane, in July, 1814, and was severely wounded in the latter contest. He was in command of cadets at West Point from 1820 to 1828, and in 1838 was made colonel of the 8th United States Infantry. He served in the Seminole War from 1840 to 1842, and was in command of the army in Florida in 1841-42. He was brevetted a brigadiergeneral in March, 1842, commanded a brigade under General Taylor in Mexico in 1846, and was distinguished in the capture of Monterey. In 1847-48 he commanded a division, under General Scott, in the capture of Vera Cruz, and in the battles from Cerro Gordo to the assault and capture of the city of Mexico. He was brevetted major-general, and was presented with a sword by Congress, by
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