Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1794 AD or search for 1794 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Graydon, William -1840 (search)
Graydon, William -1840 Lawyer; born near Bristol, Pa., Sept. 4, 1759; brother of Great Bridge. Alexander Graydon; studied law; removed to Pittsburg, where he began practice. In 1794-95 he was a prominent leader in the Mill-dam troubles. He published a Digest of the laws of the United States; Forms of Conveyancing and of practice in the various courts and public offices, etc. He died in Harrisburg, Pa., Oct. 13, 1840.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Green, Beriah 1794-1874 (search)
Green, Beriah 1794-1874 Reformer; born in New York in 1794; graduated at Middlebury College in 1819; became an independent clergyman; settled in Ohio in 1821, and became president of the Oneida Institute in 1824; was a leader in the organization of the American Anti-Slavery Society, and for some time its president. He was the author of History of the Quakers. He died in Whitestown, N. Y., May 4, 1874. Green, Beriah 1794-1874 Reformer; born in New York in 1794; graduated at Middlebury College in 1819; became an independent clergyman; settled in Ohio in 1821, and became president of the Oneida Institute in 1824; was a leader in the organization of the American Anti-Slavery Society, and for some time its president. He was the author of History of the Quakers. He died in Whitestown, N. Y., May 4, 1874.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Greenville, treaty at. (search)
Greenville, treaty at. After the successful campaigns of Gen. Anthony Wayne against the Northwestern Indian tribes in 1793-94, his army lay in winter quarters in Greenville, Darke co., O., and there, on Aug. 3, 1795, he concluded a treaty with several of the tribes—namely, Wyandottes, Delawares, Shawnees, Ottawas, Chippewas, Pottawatomies, Miamis, Eel River Indians, Weas, Piankshaws, Kickapoos, and Kaskaskias. There were 1,130 Indian participants in making the treaty. The principal chiefs present were Tarhe, Buckhongehelas, Black Hoof, Blue Jacket, and Little Turtle. The basis of the treaty was that hostilities should permanently cease and all prisoners be restored. The boundary-line between the United States and the lands of the several tribes was fixe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harmar, Josiah 1753-1813 (search)
ade Indian agent for the territory northwest of the Ohio, and in 1787 Congress made him a brevet brigadier-general. On Sept. 29, 1789, he was appointed commander-inchief of the army of the United States, and had charge of an expedition against the Miami Indians in the fall of 1790, but was defeated. Harmar resigned his commission in January, 1792, and was made adjutant-general of Pennsylvania in 1793, in which post he was active in furnishing Pennsylvania troops for Wayne's campaign in 1793-94. He died in Philadelphia, Aug. 20, 1813. At the time of his expedition against the Indians, the British, in violation of the treaty of 1783, still held Detroit and ether Western military posts. British agents instigated the Indians of the Northwest to make war on the frontier settlers, in order to secure for British commerce the monopoly of the fur-trade. This had been kept up ever since 1783, and the posts were held with a hope that the league of States would fall to pieces, and an oppo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harrison, William Henry 1773-1812 (search)
commissioned him an ensign. Made a lieutenant in 1792, he afterwards became an efficient aide to General Wayne, and with him went through the campaign in Ohio, in 1794. After the treaty of Greenville (1794), he was placed in command of Fort Washington, on the site of Cincinnati, and was promoted to captain. While on duty at Nor1794), he was placed in command of Fort Washington, on the site of Cincinnati, and was promoted to captain. While on duty at North Bend, he was married to Anna, daughter of Judge Symmes, an extensive land-owner there. In 1797 he was appointed secretary of the Northwest Territory, and left the army. In 1799 he became a delegate to Congress, and was made the first governor of Indian Territory in 1801. That office he held until 1813, and, as superintendentn on the Eel River, excepting the buildings erected by the United States for the then deceased chief on account of his friendship since the treaty of Greenville in 1794. Another detachment, under Col. S. Wells, was sent, Sept. 16, to destroy a Pottawattomie town on the Elkhart River, 60 miles distant; while Colonel Payne, with an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hayes, Rutherford Birchard 1822-1893 (search)
he supremacy of the Constitution has been resisted and the perpetuity of our institutions imperilled, the principle of this statute, enacted by the fathers, has enabled the government of the Union to maintain its authority and to preserve the integrity of the nation. At the most critical periods of our history my predecessors in the executive office have relied on this great principle. It was on this principle that President Washington suppressed the Whiskey Rebellion in Pennsylvania in 1794. In 1806, on the same principle, President Jefferson broke up the Burr conspiracy by issuing orders for the employment of such force, either of the regulars or of the militia, and by such proceedings of the civil authorities, as might enable them to suppress effectually the further progress of the enterprise. And it was under the same authority that President Jackson crushed nullification in South Carolina, and that President Lincoln issued his call for troops to save the Union in 1861.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hazard, Ebenezer 1744-1817 (search)
Hazard, Ebenezer 1744-1817 Author; born in Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 15, 1744; son of Samuel Hazard; was the first postmastergeneral under the Confederation (1782-89), and left the place when the new government was organized under the national Constitution. He graduated at Princeton in 1762. Mr. Hazard published Historical collections, in 2 volumes, in 1792-94; also, Remarks on a report concerning Western Indians. He died in Philadelphia, June 13, 1817.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Henry, Patrick 1736- (search)
t Richmond (March, 1775), and, at the head of the militia of Hanover, compelled Lord Dunmore (q. v.) to restore powder he had removed from the colonial magazine at Williamsburg. For a short time Henry was in the military service, and was the first governor of the State of Virginia (1776-79). He was again elected governor after the war and was a member of the State convention that ratified the national Constitution, he opposing it with all his strength because it menaced State supremacy. In 1794 Henry retired from the bar, and took up his abode at Red Hill, in Charlotte. Washington appointed him Secretary of State in 1795; but he declined the nomination, as he did that of envoy to France, offered by President Adams, and of governor offered by the people. Henry was elected to the State Senate in 1799, but, dying June 6, 1799, never took his seat. When the news of the passage of the Stamp Act and kindred measures reached Virginia (May, 1765) the House of Burgesses was in session.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Howe, Richard, Earl 1725-1799 (search)
with his brother, William Howe, to make peace with or war upon the Americans. They failed to secure peace, and made war. After leaving the Delaware with his fleet, in 1778, he had an encounter off Rhode Island with a French fleet, under the Count d'estaing, when he disappeared from the American waters. In 1782 he was made admiral of the blue, and created an English viscount; and in September of that year he relieved Gibraltar, and received the thanks of both Houses of Parliament. In 1787 he was made admiral of the white, and in August the next year was raised to an earldom. Because of a complete victory over the French, which he obtained in 1794, he was rewarded with a gold medal, the Order of the Garter, and the commission of admiral of the fleet, which he resigned in 1797.. His last service in the royal navy was persuading mutineers at Spithead to return to duty. He died in England, Aug. 5, 1799. In St. Paul's Cathedral a fine monument was erected to the memory of Admiral Howe.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Howell, Richard 1753-1802 (search)
Howell, Richard 1753-1802 Military officer; born in Newark, Del., in 1753; was one of the number indicted for participating in firing the cargo of tea at Greenwich, N. J., in November, 1774; promoted major in 1776; governor of New Jersey in 1794-1801. He wrote a poem to welcome Washington to Trenton, N. J., when the latter passed through that city on his way to New York to be inaugurated President. He died in Trenton, N. J., April 28, 1802.
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