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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hunter, John Dunn (search)
Hunter, John Dunn Adventurer; born of white parents west of the Mississippi about 1798; was adopted by the Kickapoo Indians while an infant. In 1817 he went to New Orleans to seek an education; later visited New York, Philadelphia, and other cities, and for a time was warmly received everywhere. Prior to the Mexican War he tried to secure from the Mexican government an immense tract of land on which he said he would settle Indians and thus form a barrier to the encroachments of the United States. After this attempt met with failure he went to Texas and became a leader in the party seeking independence. He publish-Ed manners and customs of several Indian tribes located West of the Mississippi. He was killed by an Indian near Nacogdoches, Tex., in 1827.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Huntington, Ebenezer 1754-1834 (search)
Huntington, Ebenezer 1754-1834 Military officer; born in Norwich, Conn., Dec. 26, 1754; graduated at Yale College in 1775, and joined the patriot army as lieutenant in Wyllys's regiment. He served under Heath, Parsons, and Watts, and commanded the regiment of the latter in Rhode Island in 1778 as lieutenantcolonel. At Yorktown he commanded a battalion of infantry, and served on General Lincoln's staff until the end of the war, when he was made a general of the Connecticut militia. Huntington was named by Washington for brigadier-general in 1798. In 1810-11 and 1817-19 he was a member of Congress. He died in Norwich, June 17, 1834.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Impeachment. (search)
eir decision there is no appeal. A vote of two-thirds of the Senate is necessary to convict. When the President is tried the chief-justice presides. The punishment is limited by the Constitution (1) to removal from office; (2) to disqualification from holding and enjoying any office of honor, trust, or profit under the United States government. Important cases: (1) William Blount, United States Senator from Tennessee, for conspiring to transfer New Orleans from Spain to Great Britain, 1797-98; acquitted for want of evidence. (2) John Pickering, judge of the district court of New Hampshire, charged with drunkenness, profanity, etc.; convicted March 12, 1803. (3) Judge Samuel Chase, impeached March 30, 1804; acquitted March 1, 1805. (4) James H. Peck, district judge of Missouri, impeached Dec. 13, 1830, for arbitrary conduct, etc.; acquitted. (5) West H. Humphreys, district judge of Tennessee, impeached and convicted for rebellion, Jan. 26, 1862. (6) Andrew Johnson, President of t<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Irwin, Jared 1750-1818 (search)
Irwin, Jared 1750-1818 Legislator; born in Sunnyside, home of Washington Irving. Mecklenburg county, N. C., in 1750; removed to Georgia, and served throughout the Revolutionary War; was a member of the State constitutional conventions of 1789, 1795, and 1798; and was elected governor of the State in 1796 and 1806. He died in Union, Ga., March 1, 1818.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jackson, Andrew 1767-1845 (search)
to Nashville in 1788; was United States attorney for that district in 1790; member of the convention that framed the State constitution of Tennessee in 1796; member of the United States Senate in 1797; and judge of the Tennessee Supreme Court from 1798 to 1804. From 1798 until 1814 he was major-general of the Tennessee militia, and conducted the principal campaign against the Creek Indians, which resulted in the complete subjugation of that nation in the spring of 1814. On May 31, 1814, he was1798 until 1814 he was major-general of the Tennessee militia, and conducted the principal campaign against the Creek Indians, which resulted in the complete subjugation of that nation in the spring of 1814. On May 31, 1814, he was appointed a major-general in the regular army and given command of the Department of the South. His victory at New Orleans, Jan. 8, 1815, gave him great renown. On Jan. 21, with the main body of his army, he entered the city. He was met in the suburbs by almost the entire population, who greeted the victors as their saviors. Two days afterwards there was an imposing spectacle in the city. At Jackson's request, the apostolic prefect of Louisiana appointed Jan. 23 a day for the public offe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jackson, James 1757-1806 (search)
f 1778, he fled to South Carolina, where he joined General Moultrie. His appearance was so wretched while in his flight, that he was arrested, tried, and condemned as a spy, and was about to be executed, when a reputable citizen of Georgia, who knew him, saved him. Jackson fought a duel James Jackson. in March, 1780, with Lieutenant-Governor Wells, killing his antagonist, and being severely wounded himself. He joined Col. Elijah Clarke, and became aide to Sumter. With Pickens he shared in the victory at the Cowpens. He afterwards did good service as commander of a legionary corps, and was presented with a dwelling in Savannah by the Georgia legislature. In 1786 he was made brigadier-general, and in 1788 was elected governor of Georgia, but the latter office he declined. From 1789 to 1791 he was a member of Congress, and from 1793 to 1795, and from 1801 to 1806, United States Senator. From 1798 to 1801 he was governor of the State. He died in Washington, D. C., March 12, 1806.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kent, James 1763-1847 (search)
Kent, James 1763-1847 Jurist; born in Phillipstown, N. Y., July 31, 1763; studied law James Kent. with Egbert Benson; and began its practice in 1787, at Poughkeepsie, N. Y. He was a member of the New York legislature from 1790 to 1793, and became Professor of Law in Columbia College in 1793. Deeply versed in the doctrine of civil law, he was made a master in chancery in 1796; city recorder in 1797; judge of the Supreme Court in 1798; chiefjustice in 1804; and was chancellor from 1814 to 1823. After taking a leading part in the State constitutional convention in 1821, he again became law professor in Columbia College, and the lectures he there delivered form the basis of his able Commentaries on the United States Constitution, published in 4 volumes. He was one of the clearest legal writers of his day. In 1828 he was elected president of the New York Historical Society. He passed his later years in revising and enlarging his Commentaries, and in giving opinions on legal subj
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kentucky resolutions, the (search)
Kentucky resolutions, the The Federal party in the United States determined to crush out by the arm of law the anti-Federalists who were bitterly attacking the administration. In 1798 they succeeded in passing the Naturalization act of June 18, the Alien acts of June 25 and July 6, and the Sedition act of July 14. Virginia, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Kentucky petitioned Congress to repeal these laws. Of these, Kentucky felt the most aggrieved, and on Nov. 8, 1798, John Breck, with a request that the same may be communicated to the legislature thereof. And that a copy be furnished to each of the Senators and Representatives representing this State in the Congress of the United States. The Kentucky Resolutions of 1798 were followed by another series in 1799, in which the right of a sovereign State to nullify obnoxious laws of the federal government was distinctly claimed. The Resolutions of 1799 asserted that the principle and construction contended for by s
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), King, Rufus 1755-1827 (search)
e., March 14, 1755; graduated at Harvard in 1777; studied law with Theophilus Parsons, in Newburyport, and in 1778 became aide-de-camp on General Glover's staff, in the expedition against the British on Rhode Island. In 1785 he was an earnest advocate of the absolute freedom of the slaves, to be secured by the operation of an act of Congress, making such freedom a fundamental principle of the Constitution. Mr. King and General Schuyler were chosen the first representatives of New York in the national Senate of 1789, under the new Constitution. Mr. King was a leading Federalist. From 1798 to 1804 he was American minister to Great Britain; and in 1818 he was sent to the United States Senate for the third time. He was an able leader of the opposition to the admission of Missouri under the terms of the compromise as a slave-labor State. In 1825 he accepted the appointment of minister to England, but returned in feeble health the next year, and died in Jamacia, L. I., April 29, 1827.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lamar, Mirabeau Buonaparte 1798- (search)
Lamar, Mirabeau Buonaparte 1798- Statesman; born in Louisville, Ga., Aug. 16, 1798; uncle of the preceding. In 1835 he went to Texas, and commanded the cavalry in the battle of San Jacinto, which secured the independence of the province. He was attorney-general and secretary of the new State, and was elected its first vice-president in 1836, then holding the rank of major-general. He was president from 1838 to 1841, and in 1846 he joined General Taylor in the invasion of Mexico. In 1858 he published the Columbus Inquirer, a State rights journal. Just previous to his death, in Richmond, Tex., Dec. 19, 1859, he was United States minister to Nicaragua and Costa Rica.
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