hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 264 results in 175 document sections:

... 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
county. --In pursuance of the provisions of a deed of trust, executed to the undersigned by Benjamin T. Doswell dated January 16th, 1861, and duty recorded in Hanover county, I shall sell at public auction, to the highest bidder, for cash, at New Market, in the county of Hanover, on Tuesday, the 9th day of April, 1861, all the interest of the said Benjamin T. Doswell in the tract of land called New Market, on which Mrs. Lilly Ann Doswell, now resides, containing about 527 by aces; and also, in 13 Slaves, now held for life by Mrs. Lilly Ann Doswell. The interest of the said Benjamin T. Doswell in the land is a present vested fee in one-third thereof, and a vested remainder in fee in one-half of another third. His interest in the slaves is a vested remainder in fee, in one-half. C. G. Griswold, Trustee. Postponement.--In consequence of the inclemency of the weather, the above sale is postponed until Friday, the 19th April, 1861., C. G. Griswold, Trustee. ap 12--T&Ftds
Trustee's Sale of land and Slaves in Hanover county. --In pursuance of the provisions of a deed of trust, executed to the undersigned by Benjamin T. Doswell, dated January 16th, 1861, and duly recorded in Hanover county, I shall sell at public auction, to the highest bidder, for cash, at New Market, in the county of Hanover, on Tuesday, the 9th day of April, 1861, all the interest of the said Benjamin T. Doswell in the tract of land called New Market, on which Mrs. Lilly Ann Doswell now resides, containing about 537 acres; and also, in 13 Slaves, now held for life by Mrs. Lilly Ann Doswell in the land is a present vested fee in one-third thereof, and a vested remainder in fee in one-half of another third. His interest in the slaves is a vested remainder in fee, in one-half. C. G. Griswold, Trustee. Postponement.--In consequence of the inclemency of the weather, the above sale is postponed until Friday, the 19th April, 1861. C. G. Griswold, Trustee. ap 12--T&Ftds
Trustee's Sale of land and five Negroes, in Hanover. --Pursuant to the provisions of a deed of trust, dated the 24th October, 1860, and recorded in the Clerk's Office of Hanover County Court, on the 25th October, 1860, from Burwell B. Dickinson, and Otery F., his wife, to the subscriber, I shall, at the request of-- & Hutcheson, the beneficiaries in said deed, on Friday, the 19th of April, 1861, (if fair; if not, the first fair day thereafter. Sundays excepted,) proceed to sell at auction, for cash, to the highest bidder, at Green Bay, in the upper end of Hanover, three miles from Beaver Dam Depot, on the Virginia Central Railroad, and half a mile from Green Bay Crossing, the following properly, or so much thereof as may be necessary to pay the debt, $2,084.80, secured by said deed of trust, with interest thereon from the 24th October, 1860, and all costs of preparing and enforcing said deed of trust, selling the Negroes first. The property to be sold is thus described in the d
Trustee's Sale of land and five Negroes, in Hanover. --Pursuant to the provisions of a deed of trust, dated the 24th October, 1860, and recorded in the Clerk's Office of Hanover County Court, on the 25th October, 1860, from Burwell B. Dickinson, and Otery F., his wife, to the subscriber, I shall, at the request of--& Hutcheson, the beneficiaries in said deed, on Friday, the 19th of April, 1861, (if fair; if not, the first fair day thereafter, Sundays excepted,) proceed to sell at auction, for Cash, to the highest bidder, at Green Bay, in the upper end of Hanover, three miles from Beaver Dam Depot, on the Virginia Central Railroad, and half a mile from Green Bay Crossing, the following property, or so much thereof as may be necessary to pay the debt, $2,084.80, secured by said deed of trust, with interest thereon from the 24th October, 1860, and all costs of preparing and enforcing said deed of trust, selling the Negroes first. The property to be sold is thus described in the dee
ol. Warner. Correspondence, Etc. The following is the correspondence of the authorities with the railroad officials and President Lincoln, on the subject of stopping the passage of troops: Mayor's office, city Hall, Baltimore, April 19, 1861. John W. Garrett, Esq., Pres't Baltimore and Ohio Railroad: Sir We advise that the troops now here be sent back to the borders of Maryland. Respectfully, [Signed] Thomas H. Hicks, Geo. Wm. Brown. By order of the Board of Police. vice, I have instantly telegraphed the same to the Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore Railroad Company, and this company will act in accordance therewith. Your obd't servant, J. W. Garrett, President. Mayor's office, Baltimore, April 19, 1861. To His Excellency the President of the United States. Sir: A collision between the citizens and the Northern troops has taken place in Baltimore, and the excitement is fearful. Send no troops here. We will endeavor to prevent all blo
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.movement of soldiers--Home Guard. Harrisonburg, Va., April 19, 1861. Last night we sent off the Valley Guards, Capt. Sprinkel, 75 men; the Rockingham Rifles, 108 men, Capt. Kenney To-day the balance of the Volunteer Regiment, composed of the Bridgewater Grays, Capt. Brown; the Elk Run Grays, Capt. Covington; the Peaked Mountain Grays, Capt. Yancey; the Letcher Brock's Gap Rifles, Capt. Winfield; Chisman's Infantry, Capt. Chisman. To- morrow the Battalion of Cavalry, under Maj. Patterson--Harrisonburg Cavalry, 100 men; Mt. Crawford Cavalry, full company; the Union Cavalry, large company; the McGaheysville Cavalry. Altogether it was the finest military display I have ever seen. --The volunteer regiment were accompanied by Prof. Erhman's Cornet Band. They were all very lively, and all seemed glad at the prospect of a brush with Abraham's hirelings.--Not a man was "down in the mouth," notwithstanding the farewell of friends. Our regime
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.a General move to the scene of war — patriotism among the ladies, etc. Staunton, Va., April 19, 1861. I wrote you day before yesterday of the departure of the West Augusta Guard and the Staunton Artillery. Since that time there has been no diminution of the military enthusiasm, but an increase rather. Our town has worn the appearance of a military camp. Six volunteer companies, (three from this county and three from Rockbridge,) left to-day for Harper's Ferry, footing it down the Macadamized road to Winchester. Two other companies have also gone from this county, not passing through Staunton. And there are yet two other companies who will move as soon as they get arms. The Rockbridge Mounted Riflemen went on to-day without arms. Capt. J. H. Skinner mustered his militia company to-day, and notified that they would be constantly drilled, and must hold themselves ready to move at an hour's notice. It will be found that there are n
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.the capture of the Argo. City Point, April 19, 1861. This morning Capt. Ballard presented a telegram from Gov. Letcher for the release of the beautiful prize ship "Argo," and assigning as a reason that she was loaded with freight belonging to citizens of Richmond and Petersburg. No doubt Gov. Letcher has been misinformed, for I assure you that there is not a pound of freight aboard or on the wharf. Maj. Maclin and Lieut. Lewis W. Burwell, (formerly of your city,) are in command, and express the hope that Gov. L. will countermand his order. The ship cost her owners fifty thousand dollars four years ago. Maj. Maclin left for Petersburg this morning to consult with Col. E. L. Brockett. Tit for Tat.
w days since to the families of those now absent at Pensacola. He, as well as many others of our citizens, make such donations in so quiet a way that they are only to be heard of accidentally, or we should have noticed the fact before this. Benjamin Conly, Esq., presented to the Blodget Volunteers the sum of one hundred dollars, and we understand, also, that Judge A. P. Robertson gave one thousand dollars towards the relief fund for the families of absent soldiers. Augusta, April 19, 1861. Friend Blodget: You asked me this morning to assist you in clothing your new company to go to the wars. I do so cheerfully.--Have a complete suit for each member made and send the bill to me. While on your tour of duty. I will have placed to your credit fifty dollars a month in the Mechanics' Bank of this city, and you can draw your checks for the same from time to time, for the most needful of your company, to be distributed here to their families, or to the most deserving in y
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.meeting in Orange county. Gordonsville, April 19, 1861. At a meeting of the citizens of Gordonsville and its vicinity, held in Gordonsville, Orange county, Va., on the 18th of April, for the purpose of forming a Home Guard, on motion, Mr. William Cowherd was called to the Chair, and Robert Taylor appointed temporary Secretary. The object of the meeting being explained by the Chairman, Col. Strange then, in a soul-stirring and patriotic address, urged the necessity for this organization, which was unanimously responded to. The meeting then determined to organize by electing permanent officers; whereupon, William Cowherd, Esq., was unanimously chosen President, who, in acknowledging the confidence thus reposed, responded in a most feeling and impressive address, alluding in terms that brought tears to the eyes of the grey-headed fathers present, to the contribution he had made in his two sons, who had just buckled on their armor and gon
... 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18