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oth in the East and in the West. This denial of belligerent rights could not be maintained, since the Government was forced to take warlike measures for the suppression of the so-called insurrection, and no real attempt was made to carry this theory to its logical conclusion, except in the case of the first privateers captured. Learning that the Confederacy had issued commissions for privateers to prey upon the commerce of the United States, President Lincoln issued a proclamation on April 19, 1861, declaring that these would be treated as pirates. An opportunity to enforce the proclamation soon arose. The privateer Savannah, with thirteen men on board, was captured off Charleston Harbor on June 3d. The prisoners were taken to New York and placed in the Tombs (the city prison), where they remained until turned over to the War Department and transferred to Fort Lafayette, on February 3, 1862. They were brought to trial on the charge of piracy on October 23, 1861, but they ha
; his son, Francis Key Howard, Henry M. Warfield, and other Baltimore prisoners remained in confinement until they were released without conditions, though release on taking an oath had been previously offered. The policy of arbitrary arrests was extensively employed to crush out secession sentiment in Maryland. The mayor of Baltimore, the chief of police, and the entire board of police commissioners of the city were arrested, not as a result of their action in the Baltimore riots of April 19, 1861, where they seem to have done their best to protect the Sixth Massachusetts regiment, but because their opposition to the passage of further troops through Baltimore was deemed seditious, and their sympathies were supposed to be with the South. Many members of the Maryland legislature were also arrested on and after September 20, 1861, and confined first in Fort McHenry, then in Fort Lafayette, and finally in Fort Warren, in order to forestall the passage of an act of secession. Some o
n its dark blue uniforms. These men have not yet heard the crash of a Confederate volley, but they are soon to do so on the disastrous field of Bull Run. They served almost three months, being mustered in on May 14, 1861, and mustered out August 12th. Officers of the ninth Massachusetts infantry at Camp Cass, 1861 A little over two months before this regiment left Boston for Washington, the Sixth Massachusetts had been defending itself against the mob in the streets of Baltimore, April 19, 1861. Massachusetts poured regiment after regiment to the front until seventy-one regiments had answered President Lincoln's calls. Besides the infantry, Massachusetts sent five regiments and three battalions of cavalry, four regiments, a battalion, and thirty unassigned companies of heavy artillery, eighteen batteries of light artillery, and two companies of sharpshooters. The Ninth Massachusetts left Boston for Washington on June 27, 1861. At the first and second Bull Run, on the Peninsu
n its dark blue uniforms. These men have not yet heard the crash of a Confederate volley, but they are soon to do so on the disastrous field of Bull Run. They served almost three months, being mustered in on May 14, 1861, and mustered out August 12th. Officers of the ninth Massachusetts infantry at Camp Cass, 1861 A little over two months before this regiment left Boston for Washington, the Sixth Massachusetts had been defending itself against the mob in the streets of Baltimore, April 19, 1861. Massachusetts poured regiment after regiment to the front until seventy-one regiments had answered President Lincoln's calls. Besides the infantry, Massachusetts sent five regiments and three battalions of cavalry, four regiments, a battalion, and thirty unassigned companies of heavy artillery, eighteen batteries of light artillery, and two companies of sharpshooters. The Ninth Massachusetts left Boston for Washington on June 27, 1861. At the first and second Bull Run, on the Peninsu
sident Lincoln's call for troops, April 15, 1861, was the Seventh Infantry. The best blood and most honored names in New York City were prominent in its ranks. It eventually supplied no less than 606 officers to the Union army. Veterans now hail it as the highest type of the citizen soldiers who went to the front. The old armory at the foot of Third Avenue could not contain the crowds that gathered. At this writing (1911) it is just being demolished. The Seventh left for Washington April 19, 1861, and as it marched down Broadway passed such a multitude of cheering citizens that its splendid band was almost unheard through the volume of applause. On April 24th the regiment reached Annapolis Junction, Maryland. On that and the day following, with the Eighth Massachusetts for company, it had to patch the railway and open communications with Washington. The men were mustered into service on April 26th, and their Camp on Meridian Hill, May 2d to 23d, was pointed out as a model. Th
lege he was the smallest boy that had ever been received as a student. After becoming known as the poet of the college, he traveled extensively in the West Indies and South America, landing in 1858 in New Orleans on his return. Then he accepted the chair of English literature at Poydras College, a flourishing Creole institution at Pointe Coupee, Louisiana. He was still teaching there when he learned through the New Orleans Delta of the attack on the Sixth Massachusetts in Baltimore on April 19, 1861. That night he wrote the verses that ran like wildfire through the South and were parodied numberless times in the North. The remainder of his days were chiefly spent in newspaper work, largely in Georgia. He became indifferent to his poetical work, and it was owing to the insistence of his friend, Miss Lillian McGregor Shepherd, that his verse was collected. Through her courtesy is here reproduced the intimate and appealing photograph above, a gift to her from the poet himself. He
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 4.21 (search)
d at being required to play the spy, and eavesdrop a private family conversation. I hear Mr. Kyle paid Secretary Stanton five hundred dollars for the privilege of seeing his son. Another report is that Miss Kyle slipped one hundred dollars in gold in her brother's mouth, besides greenbacks in his hands, despite the vigilance of the guard and surgeon. I know Major Kyle has plenty of money, and bribes the guards to bring him articles, carry out letters, etc. He was one of the rioters, 19th of April, 1861, who attempted to drive back the Federal troops passing through Baltimore to Washington and the front. Mrs. Robert Carr, Mrs. P. H. Sullivan, Mrs. J. M. Coulter, Mrs. Egerton, the Misses Jamison, and other noble Baltimore ladies, send choice fresh vegetables, milk, clothing, etc., to our hospital, and while all are received, none of them are appropriated as intended by the generous, warm-hearted donors. I suppose the greedy Yankees eat the fruit and vegetables, and wear or sell the c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
d afforded, but in stimulating our friends elsewhere to help until the Society shall be placed on a firm; financial basis, and prepared to do in a more satisfactory manner the grand work before us. We need scarcely add, that the warm grasp and cordial greetings of our old comrades were none the less pleasant because of this generous, practical sympathy. The Association of the Maryland line was organized last summer in Baltimore, and all persons who were citizens of Maryland, on April 19th, 1861, and who subsequently were duly commissioned, or mustered into the military or naval service of the Confederate States, and served honorably therein, are eligible to membership. The following officers were elected July 22nd: President, Brigadier-General Bradley T. Johnson. Board of Governors: Major-General I. R. Trimble; Brigadier-General George H. Steuart; Lieutenant-Colonel Jas. R. Herbert; Lieutenant-Colonel Robert Carter Smith; Captain Jno. W. Torsch; Captain McHenry Howard: Lie
o that troops to defend the capital might be considered as not having been sent out of Maryland. It will be remembered that these proclamations were three days after the requisition made by the Secretary of War on the states which had not seceded for their quota of troops to serve in the war about to be inaugurated against the South, and that rumors existed at the time in Baltimore that troops from the Northeast were about to be sent through that city toward the South. On the next day, April 19, 1861, a body of troops arrived at the railroad depot; the citizens assembled in large numbers, and though without arms, disputed the passage through the city. They attacked the troops with the loose stones found in the street, which was undergoing repair, and with such determination and violence, that some of the soldiers were wounded, and they fired upon the multitude, killing a few and wounding many. The police of Baltimore were very active in their efforts to prevent conflict and prese
ess to resist the direct impact of heavy shot at short ranges. An officer of the navy, as skillful in ordnance as he was in seamanship, and endowed with high capacity for the investigation of new problems— Lieutenant Catesby ap R. Jones—had conducted many of these experiments, and, as will be seen hereafter, made efficient use of his knowledge both in construction and in battle. After Virginia had seceded from the United States, but before she had acceded to the Confederate States—on April 19, 1861—General Taliaferro, in command of Virginia forces, arrived at Norfolk. Commodore McCauley, United States Navy, and commandant of the navy yard, held a conference with General Taliaferro, the result of which was that none of the vessels should be removed, not a shot fired except in selfdefense. The excitement which had existed in the town was quieted by the announcement of this arrangement; it was soon ascertained that the Germantown and Merrimac, frigates in the port, had been scuttle
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