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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 27 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 26 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 26 26 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 24 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 24 24 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 23 23 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 23 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 23 23 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 22 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 22 22 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1862 AD or search for 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 467 results in 431 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), California (search)
Term. John C. Fremont 1846 Provisional or military governors under the United States. Name.Term. Corn. Robert F. Stockton1847 John C. Fremont1847 Gen. Stephen W. Kearny1847 Richard B. Mason1847 to 1849 Gen. Persifer F. Smith1849 Bennett Riley1849 State governors. Name.Term. Peter H. Burnett1849 to 1851 John McDougall1851 to 1852 John Bigler1852 to 1856 J. Neely Johnson1856 to 1858 John B. Weller1858 to 1860 Milton S. Latham1860 John G. Downey1860 to 1862 Leland Stanford1862 to 1863 Frederick F. Low1863 to 1867 Henry H. Haight1867 to 1871 Newton Booth1871 to 1875 Romnaldo Pacheco1875 William Irwin1875 to 1880 George C. Perkins1880 to 1883 George Stoneman1883 to 1887 Washington Bartlett1887 Robert W. Waterman1887 to 1891 Henry H. Markhan1891 to 1895 J. H. Budd1895 to 1899 Henry T. Gage1899 to 1903 United States Senators. Name.No. of CongressTerm. John C. Fremont31st1849 to 1851 William M. Gwin31st to 36th1849 to 1861 John B. Weller32d to 34th18
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Campbell, Lewis Davis 1811- (search)
Campbell, Lewis Davis 1811- Diplomatist; born in Franklin, O., Aug. 9, 1811; engaged in journalism for several years; then practised law in Hamilton; Whig representative to Congress in 1849-58; colonel of an Ohio infantry regiment in 1861-62; appointed minister to Mexico in December, 1865. In the latter service he was empowered to assure President Juarez of the moral support of the United States, and to offer him the aid of the United States military forces in restoring order. He returned to the United States in 1868, and again held a seat in Congress in 1871-73. He died Nov. 26, 1882.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Canby, Edward Richard Sprigg 1819- (search)
Canby, Edward Richard Sprigg 1819- Military officer; born in Kentucky in 1819; graduated at West Point in 1839; served in the Seminole War (q. v.) and the war with Mexico. He was twice brevetted for eminent services in the latter Edward R. S. Canby war. He was promoted to major in 1855, and colonel in 1861. In 1861 he was in command in New Mexico until late in 1862, and in March of that year was made brigadier-general of volunteers. He was promoted to major-general of volunteers in May, 1864, and took command of the Department of West Mississippi. He captured Mobile, April 12, 1865, and afterwards received the surrender of the Confederate armies of Generals Taylor and E. Kirby Smith. On July 28, 1866, he was commissioned a brigadier-general in the regular army, and in 1869 took command of the Department of the Columbia, on the Pacific coast. He devoted himself to the settlement of difficulties with the Modoc Indians (q. v.), and, while so doing, was treacherously murdered
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carr, Eugene Asa 1830- (search)
Carr, Eugene Asa 1830- Military officer; born in Concord, N. Y., March 20, 1830; was graduated at West Point in 1850. As. a member of mounted rifles, he was engaged in Indian warfare in New Mexico, Texas, and the West; and in 1861 served under Lyon, in Missouri, as colonel of Illinois cavalry. He commanded a division in the battle at Pea Ridge (q. v.), and was severely wounded. He was made a brigadier-general of volunteers in 1862. He commanded a division in the battle at Port Gibson (q. v.) and others preceding the capture of Vicksburg; also in the assaults on that place. He assisted in the capture of Little Rock, Ark., and the defences of Mobile. He was retired as brigadier-general and brevet major-general U. S. A. in 1893.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cervera y Topeto, Pascual De, Conde De Jerez, Marquis De Santa Ana (search)
Cervera y Topeto, Pascual De, Conde De Jerez, Marquis De Santa Ana Naval officer; born in the province of Jerez Spain, in 1833; was graduated at the San Fernando Naval Academy in 1851. He par ticipated in the expeditions to Morocco Admiral Cervera. in 1859 and Cochin-China in 1862, and in the blockade of Cuba against filibuster in 1870; and later became secretary o the navy. He was promoted admiral in 1888. In the war with the United State in 1898 he was given command of the fleet sent to operate in Cuban waters. After Hobson and his companions, who sunk the collier at the entrance of Santiago Harbor, were captured by the Spaniards, they were handsomely treated by Admiral Cervera till regularly exchanged. When the admiral received orders to attempt an escape from the harbor of Santiago he saw and reported the hopelessness of such an undertaking, yet when peremptory orders were received he did not hesitate to act upon them. The result was one of the most thrilling naval en
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chamberlain, Daniel Henry 1835- (search)
Chamberlain, Daniel Henry 1835- Lawyer; born in West Brookfield, Mass., June 23, 1835; graduated at Yale College in 1862, and at Harvard Law School in 1864; entered the Union army as an officer in the 5th Massachusetts Colored Cavalry; after the war settled in South Carolina, of which he was (Republican) governor in 1874-76.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chamberlain, Joshua Lawrence 1828- (search)
Chamberlain, Joshua Lawrence 1828- Military officer and educator: born in Bangor, Me., Sept. 8, 1828; graduated at Bowdoin College in 1852. He attended a military academy in his boyhood. He was a professor in his alma mater from 1855 to 1862, when he was appointed lieutenantcolonel of a Maine regiment, and rose to brigadier-general of volunteers in the summer of 1864. He was severely wounded in the siege of Petersburg, and again at Quaker Road in March, 1865. In the final operations ending in Lee's surrender he commanded a division of the 5th Corps. General Chamberlain was a most active and efficient officer, and was in twenty-four pitched battles. He was six times wounded—three times severely. He was designated to receive the formal surrender of the weapons and colors of Lee's army, and was brevetted major-general in 1865. He resumed his professional duties in the college in 1865; was governor of Maine in 1866-71; president of Bowdoin College in 1871-83; and afterwards en
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chandler, William Eaton (search)
Chandler, William Eaton Born in Concord, N. H., Dec. 28, 1835; graduated at the Harvard Law School, and admitted to the bar in 1855; appointed reporter of the New Hampshire Supreme Court in 1859; was a member of the New Hampshire House of Representatives in 1862-1864, being twice elected speaker. In 1865 President Lincoln appointed him judge-advocate-general of the navy, and soon afterwards he was made Assistant Secretary of the Treasury. He resigned in 1867, and began practising law in New Hampshire. During the Presidential campaigns of 1868, 1872, and 1876 he rendered effective work for the Republican party as secretary of the National Republican Committee. After the campaign of 1876 he was active in the investigation of the electoral counting in Florida and South Carolina; and in 1878-79 was an important witness in the cipher despatch investigation. He was appointed solicitor-general of the United States, March 23, 1881, but his nomination was rejected by the Senate; and
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cherokee Indians, (search)
Missouri could not check the rising insurrection there. The chief men of the Cherokees held a mass-meeting at Tahlequah in August, when, with great unanimity, they declared their allegiance to the Confederate States. Ross still held out, but was finally compelled to yield. At a council held on Aug. 20, he recommended the severance of the connection with the national government. Ross's wife, a young and well-educated woman, still held out; and when an attempt was made to raise a Confederate flag over the council-house, she opposed the act with so much spirit that the Confederates desisted. During the Civil War the Cherokees suffered much. The Confederates would not trust Ross, for his Union feelings were very apparent. When, in 1862, they were about to arrest him, he and his family escaped to the North, and resided in Philadelphia for a while. In 1899 there were 32,161 Cherokees at the Union agency, Indian Territory, and 1,351 at the Eastern Cherokee agency, North Carolina.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chickasaw Bayou, battle of (search)
Chickasaw Bayou, battle of When Gen. W. T. Sherman came down from Memphis to engage in the siege of Vicksburg, late in 1862, with about 20,000 men and some heavy siege guns, he was joined by troops from Helena, Ark., and was met by a gunboat fleet, under Admiral Porter, at the mouth of the Yazoo River, just above the city (Dec. 25). The two commanders arranged a plan for attacking Vicksburg in the rear. They went up the Yazoo to capture some batteries at Chickasaw Bayou and other points. The Yazoo sweeps round in a great bend within a few miles of Vicksburg. The range of hills on which Vicksburg stands extends to the Yazoo, about 12 miles above the city, where they terminate in Haines's Bluff. There is a deep natural ditch extending from the Yazoo below Haines's Bluff to the Mississippi, called Chickasaw Bayou, passing near the bluffs, which were fortified, and along their bases were rifle-pits for sharp-shooters. This bayou lay in the path of Sherman's march up the bluff
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