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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 5 5 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 5 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 5 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 4 4 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 4 4 Browse Search
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me. I can then patiently await the investigation that I do not doubt will in due time be accorded to me. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. K. Warren, Major-General Volunteers. Request for an investigation. Petersburg, April 9, 1865. To Brigadier-General J. A. Rawlins, Chief of Staff, Headquarters Armies of United States: General: The order of General Sheridan taking from me the command of my corps on the evening of the first of April, after the victory was won, assigr to submit the following narrative of the operations of my command during the recent campaign in front of Petersburg and Richmond, terminating with the surrender of the rebel army of Northern Virginia, at Appomattox Court House, Virginia, on April 9, 1865: * * * * * During the night of the thirty-first of March, my headquarters were at Dinwiddie Court House, and the Lieutenant-General notified me that the Fifth corps would report to me, and should reach me about midnight. This corps had b
for the final surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia. The terms, and their acceptance, were embodied in the following letters, written and signed in the famous brick house on that memorable Sunday: Appomattox Court House, Virginia, April 9, 1865. General: In accordance with the substance of my letter to you of the 8th instant, I propose to receive the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia on the following terms, to wit: Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicatn to his home, not to be disturbed by the United States authority so long as they observe their paroles and the laws in force where they may reside. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. General R. E. Lee. Headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, April 9, 1865. General: I have received your letter of this date containing the terms of the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia as proposed by you. As they are substantially the same as those expressed in your Appomattox: the landmark of
for the final surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia. The terms, and their acceptance, were embodied in the following letters, written and signed in the famous brick house on that memorable Sunday: Appomattox Court House, Virginia, April 9, 1865. General: In accordance with the substance of my letter to you of the 8th instant, I propose to receive the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia on the following terms, to wit: Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicatn to his home, not to be disturbed by the United States authority so long as they observe their paroles and the laws in force where they may reside. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. General R. E. Lee. Headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, April 9, 1865. General: I have received your letter of this date containing the terms of the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia as proposed by you. As they are substantially the same as those expressed in your Appomattox: the landmark of
R. E. Lee's command. Losses: Union, 103 killed, 864 wounded, 209 missing; Confed., killed and wounded not recorded, 834 captured. March 26, 1865 to April 9, 1865: siege of Mobile, Ala., including Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely. Union, Thirteenth and Sixteenth Corps and Acting Rear-Admiral Thatcher's fleet; Confed.,rguard of Gordon's and Longstreet's Corps and Fitzhugh Lee's Cav. Losses: Union, 571 killed, 71 wounded, and missing; Confed. No record found. April 8-9, 1865: Appomattox C. H., Va. Union, Twenty-fourth Corps, one division of the Twenty-fifth Corps and Sheridan's Cav.; Confed., Gen. Fitzhugh Lee's Cav. Losses: Union, 200 killed and wounded; Confed., 500 killed and wounded. April 9, 1865: Gen. R. E. Lee surrendered the Army of Northern Virginia to the Army of the Potomac and the Army of the James; Lieut.-Gen. U. S. Grant. Confed., surrendered and paroled, 27,805. April 12-13, 1865: Montgomery, Ala. Union, Second Brigade
Major Mulford was ordered to Savannah to receive the thirteen thousand Federal sick and wounded delivered without full equivalent by Colonel Ould in the latter part of 1864. On July 4th of that year Major Mulford was advanced to brevet brigadier-general of volunteers for special service and highly meritorious conduct. He entered the war as captain in the Third New York Infantry May 14, 1861, and was promoted to major June 10, 1863, to lieutenant-colonel December 8, 1864, and to colonel April 9, 1865. He was honorably mustered out June 30, 1866. act as agent in the East, while the Confederate Government appointed Colonel Robert Ould, Assistant Secretary of War, and previously United States attorney for the District of Columbia, who served in that capacity to the end of the war. Under the supervision of these men and with the aid of General John A. Dix, the prisoners in the East were exchanged. Prisoners in the West were sent to Vicksburg, where the first exchanges were conducted b
f modern Languages in Harvard University. It was very natural, therefore, that he should be selected to write the official ode for the commemoration services held by Harvard College on July 21, 1865, for its sons who had fallen during the war. After his acceptance of the honor he tried in vain to write the poem. Only two days before the celebration he told one of his friends that it was impossible, that he was dull as a Lincoln: the last sitting—on the day of Lee's surrender on April 9, 1865, the very day of the surrender of Lee at Appomattox, Lincoln, for the last time, went to the photographer's gallery. As he sits in simple fashion sharpening his pencil, the man of sorrows cannot forget the sense of weariness and pain that for four years has been unbroken. No elation of triumph lights the features. One task is ended — the Nation is saved. But another, scarcely less exacting, confronts him. The States which lay out of their proper practical relation to the Union, in hi
tances in the life of Grant illustrate his consideration for others. At Vicksburg, Mississippi, where over thirty thousand Confederates surrendered to him, July 4, 1863, he directed his exulting troops to be orderly and quiet as the paroled prisoners passed and to make no offensive remarks. The only cheers heard there were for the defenders of Vicksburg, and the music sounded was the tune of Old hundred, in which victor and vanquished could join. The surrender at Appomattox, Virginia, April 9, 1865, was characterized by almost feminine tenderness and tact, and a sympathetic courtesy toward the conquered so marked that an observer was moved to ask, Who's surrendering here, anyway? A simple-hearted country lad disposed to bucolic life, so Grant in 1863—before the first of his great victories Grant was described in 1861 as a man who knows how to do things. In February, 1862, he captured Forts Henry and Donelson, thus opening the way for a Federal advance up the Tennessee Riv
officer Federal generals killed in battle group no. 4 Brevet Brig.-Gen. James A. Mulligan, Winchester, July 26, 1864. Brig.-Gen. Thos. G. Stevenson, Spotsylvania, May 10, 1864. Brevet Maj.-Gen. Thomas A. Smyth, Farmville, April 9, 1865 Bri.-Gen. Robt. L. McCook, Decherd, Tenn., August 6, 1862. Brig.-Gen. Nathaniel Lyon, Wilson's Creek, August 10, 1861. Brig.-Gen. Henry Bohlen, freeman's Ford, August 22, 1865. Brevet Maj.-Gen. Geo C. Strong, Fort Wagner, July 30, 10 Franklin, Tenn., Nov. 30, 18641891,0331,1042,3361,75038007026,252 Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 15-16, 18643872,5621123,061No report of killed and wounded Bentonville, N. C., Mar. 19, 18651397941701,1031951,3136102,118 Appomattox, Va., Mar. 29–Apr. 9, 18651,3167,7501,71410,780No report of losses Petersburg, Va., Apr. 2, 18656253,1893264,140No report of losses Confederate generals killed in battle Group no. 2 major-generals William D. Pender Gettysburg July 18, 1863. J. E.
army, February, 1865, showed an aggregate present of over seventy-three thousand. The Army of Northern Virginia laid down its arms at Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865. First Corps—Army of Northern Virginia The organization of the volunteer Confederate forces under Brigadier-General Beauregard into the First Corps, Armylry aided General Gordon in keeping back the Union advances and protecting the wagon-trains of the Confederate army. He was paroled at Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865, and died at Ravensworth, Fairfax County, Virginia, October 15, 1891. Major-General George Washington Custis Lee (U. S.M. A. 1854) was born at Fortress Mnd in the various operations about the Weldon Railroad. General Mahone was present at the last struggles of the war, and was paroled at Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865. After the war he was made president of the Norfolk and Tennessee Railroad and became a leading figure in Virginia politics, being elected to the United State
hers' lives, who had nursed each other and cheered each other on when another step forward seemed to mean certain death, there arose a great love that extended to the widows and orphans of those whose dying words they had heard on the field of battle. Ever since that time the organization has lent assistance to those reduced to need by the inexorable war. It admits to membership any soldier or sailor of the United States Army, Navy or Marine Corps, who served between April 12, 1861, and April 9, 1865. The Grand Army of the Republic John E. Gilman, Commander-in-Chief, Grand army of the republic At the close of the Civil War, there were over a million men in the Union armies. Nearly two and a half million had served under the Stars and Stripes during the four long years of warfare, of whom three hundred and fifty-nine thousand had died. It was essential that those still in the service should disband and retire to civilian life. This was effected after a grand parade of the
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