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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 70 AD or search for 70 AD in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Rufus, Numi'sius a Roman legate, assisted Mummius Lupercus in the defence of Vetera Castra against Civilis, A. D. 69-70 [LUPERCUS], but before that camp was taken he had left it, and joined Vocula at Novesium, where he was made prisoner by Classicus and Tutor [CLASSICUS; VOCULA], and taken to Treviri, where he was afterwards put to death by Valentinus and Tutor [VALENTINUS]. (Tac. Hist. 4.22, 55, 70, 77.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Sabi'nus, Ju'lius a Lingon, joined in the revolt of Classicus, A. D. 70, his ambition being excited not only by his natural vanity, but ty a false idea that he was descended from Julius Caesar. He ordered his followers to salute him as Cuesar; and with a large irregular body of Lingons he attacked the Sequani, and was defeated. He fled to a villa belonging to him, which he burnt, that he might be supposed to have perished in the flames, and hid himself in some subterranean chambers, where he was kept concealed for nine years by his friends and his wife Epponina, or Peponila. He was at length captured, taken to Rome, and there put to death by order of Vespasian. (Tac. Hist. 4.55, 67; D. C. 66.3, 16; Plut. Erot. 25, pp. 770, 771; CLASSICUS..) [P.S]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Sagitta, Clau'dius praefectus of an ala, hurried to L. Piso in Africa, at the beginning of A. D. 70, to inform him that his death was resolved upon. (Tac. Hist. 4.49.) [PISO, No. 26.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Sagitta, Octa'vius tribune of the plebs, A. D. 58, murdered his mistress, Pontia Postumia, because she had refused to marry him after promising to do so. He was accused by the father of Pontia, and condemned to deportatio in insulam. In the civil wars which followed Nero's death he returned to Rome, but was again condemned by the senate to his former punishment, A. D. 70. (Tac. Ann. 13.44, Hist. 4.44.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Silva'nus, Plau'tius 4. TI. PLAUTIUS SILVANUS AELIANUS, offered up the prayer as pontifex when the first stone of the Capitol was laid, in A. D. 70 (Tac. Hist. 4.53). We learn from an inscription (Gruter, p. 453; Orelli, n. 750) that he held many important military commands, and that he was twice consul. The date of these consulships, in both of which he was consul suffectus, is uncertain. Baiter, in his Fasti Consulares, places the first in the reign of Claudius, A. D. 47, and the second in the reign of Vespasian, A. D. 76.
Sulpi'cia 4. Sulpicia Praetextata, the wife of Crassus, is mentioned at the commencement of the reign of Vespasian, A. D. 70. (Tac. Hist. 4.42.)
others Tertius, but Tettius is probably the correct form. (Orelli, ad Tac. Hist. 2.85.) He was the commander of one of the three legions stationed in Moesia, and along with his fellow-commanders received the consular insignia from Otho, in consequence of a victory which they gained over the Rhoxolani, a Sarmatian tribe. Shortly afterwards, Aponius Saturninus, the governor of Moesia, made an attempt upon the life of Tettius, who escaped across Mount Haemus. He took no part in the civil war, although the legion, which he commanded, espoused the cause of Vespasian, and pleaded various delays which prevented him from joining his troops. On the triumph of the party of Vespasian, he was, notwithstanding, appointed one of the praetors ; but the senate would not allow him to enter upon the dignity, and conferred his office upon Plotius Griphus, on the 1st of January, A. D. 70. Domitian, however, almost immediately afterwards, restored him to the praetorship. (Tac. Hist. 1.79, 2.85, 4.39, 40.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
r retained some faithful adherents, but Tigellinus was not of the number. He joined with Nymphidius Sabinus, who had succeeded Fenius Rufus as praetorian prefect, in transferring the allegiance of the soldiers to Galba. By large bribes to T. Vinius, Galba's freedman, and to Vinius's daughter he purchased a reprieve from the sentence which, on all occasions, the Roman people clamorously demanded, and he even obtained from Galba a decree rebuking the populace for their petition, and informing them that Tigellinus was sinking rapidly under consumption. On the accession of Otho however, in January, A. D. 70, his doom was no longer to be eluded. A centurion and his company were despatched to Sinuessa, and Tigellinus, in the lap of luxury, and surrounded by the victims and ministers of his excesses, after a vain attempt to corrupt his executioners, perished by his own hand. (Tac. Hist. 1.72; Plut. Galb. 2,13, 17, 19, 23, 29, Oth. 2 ; D. C. 64.3; Joseph. B. J. 4.9.2; Suet. Galb. 15). [W.B.D]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
overnor of Syria, and his father, and thus he contributed greatly to Vespasian's elevation. [MUCIANUS, LICINIUS.] Vespasian was proclaimed emperor on the 1st of July, A. D. 69, and Titus accompanied him to Alexandria in Egypt. He returned to Palestine to prosecute the siege of Jerusalem, during which he showed the talents of a general with the daring of a soldier. The siege of Jerusalem, one of the most memorable on record, was concluded by the capture of the place, on the 8th of September, A. D. 70, and Titus received from the acclamations of his soldiers the title of Imperator. The most complete account of the siege and capture of Jerusalem is by Josephus. He did not return to Italy for eight months after the capture of Jerusalem, during which time he had an interview with the Parthian ambassadors at Zeugma on the Euphrates, and he paid a visit to Egypt, and assisted at the consecration of the bull Apis at Memphis. (Sueton. Titus, 100.5.) On his journey to Italy he had an interview w
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Valenti'nus, Tu'llius a chieftain of the Treviri, who endeavoured to persuade the Gauls to join in the revolt of Civilis and Classicus (A. D. 70) but was unsuccessful, on account of the opposition of Julius Auspex and the Remi; so that only the Treviri and Lingones rebelled. Valentinus acted as the leader of the Treviri, but took more pains to secure their fidelity by harangues than their success by warlike preparations. When Cerealis passed the Alps, Valentinus joined Tutor in the attempt to oppose him. In his absence two legions, which had surrendered to Classicus at Novesium and Bonna some time before, and, after taking the oath to the empire of Gaul, had been marched to the city of Treviri, voluntarily took the oath to Vespasian, and on the return of Valentinus and Tutor after their defeat by Cerealis retired to the friendly state of the Mediomatrici. Valentinus and Tutor roused the Treviri anew to arms, and, in order to make them desperate, killed Herennius and Numisius, the lega
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