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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 70 AD or search for 70 AD in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Vale'rius Asia'ticus 2. P. Valerius Asiaticus, the legatus of the province of Gallia Belgica at the death of Nero, espoused the cause of Vitellius at the beginning of A. D. 69, and soon afterwards married the daughter of Vitellius. On the fall of Vitellius he hastened to make his peace with the generals of Vespasian, and as consul designatus spoke in the senate in favour of their proposals. He was allowed in consequence to enjoy the consulship as suffectus in the following year, A. D. 70. (Tac. Hist. 1.59, 4.4, 6.)
Verax the nephew of Civilis, assisted the latter in his war against the Romans, A. D. 70. (Tac. Hist. 5.20.) [CIVILIS.]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Vespasia'nus, T. Fla'vius Sabi'nus *ou)espasiano/s, Roman emperor, A. D. 70-79, was born in the Sabine country on the 17th of November, A. D. 9. His father was a man of mean condition, of Reate, in the country of the Sabini. His mother, Vespasia Polla, was the daughter of a Praefectus Castrorum, and the sister of a Roman senator.him, and Commagene was made a Roman province. [ANTIOCHUS IV., king of Commagene.] Petilius Cerealis, who had terminated the war with the Batavi at the close of A. D. 70, was afterwards sent into Britain, and reduced to subjugation a large part of the Brigantes. Julius Frontinus, after him, subdued the Silures, or people of SouthVespasian was guilty of an act of cruelty which marks his character with a stain. Julius Sabinus, who had assumed the title of Caesar in Gaul at the beginning of A. D. 70, was at last discovered, after nine years' concealment, and brought to Rome with his wife Epponina. The faithful devotion of Epponina during these years of conce
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Victor, Clau'dius the nephew of Civilis, served under his uncle in the revolt of the Batavi in A. D. 69-70, and was sent with Julius Maximus against Vocula. (Tac. Hist. 4.33.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
e success, but neglected to fellow up his advantage, in all probability because, like the other commanders, he was a partizan of Vespasian, and did not wish that, by the destruction of Civilis, the legions of Germany should be set at liberty to go to the aid of Vitellius. On the other hand, the common soldiers, who were strongly attached to Vitellius, were for this reason in a state of almost constant mutiny, and on one occasion, when Hordeonius Flaccus was killed, Vocula only escaped by flying from the camp dressed as a slave. He was soon after joined again by three legions, with which he took possession of Magontiacum. In the revolt of Treviri, under Classicus and Tutor (A. D. 70), Vocula was forsaken by his army at Novesium, and was put to death by a deserter named Aemilius Longinus, whom Classicus sent into the camp for that purpose. His soldiers were marched off to Treviri, and meeting on their way with Longinus, they put him to death. (Tac. Hist. 4.24-26, 33-37, 56-59, 77.) [P.S]
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