Your search returned 870 results in 393 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...
Alabama lady on her way down to Pensacola, following her husband, who, she said, she would stand or fall with, and be he living or dead, she would not falter to dress his wounds. A Pensacola letter, dated 25th Jan., states as follows: "Brown, of the Auburn Guards, was killed to-day by Betts, of the Tuskegee Light Infantry. All justify Betts. The offence was an insult to Mrs. Betts." Another dispatch states that Brown lived about an hour, during which he protested that he was nBrown lived about an hour, during which he protested that he was not the man who insulted Mrs. Betts. He was killed with a bowie-knife, having first fired at Betts with a revolver, on the latter's making the attack. The South Carolina Ultimatum. The final demand of South Carolina for the surrender of Fort Sumter, it is understood, has been responded to negatively by the President, with the assurance that the fort would not be reinforced, unless demanded by Major Anderson. The impression exists in this city that this reply of the President will be
Dedication. --The large and handsome lecture room in the basement of the new Trinity (M. E.) Church, corner of Broad and 20th streets, was dedicated on Sunday morning last with appropriate services. The sermon was preached by the Rev. D. S. Doggett, D. D., from Matthew, 16th chapter, 18th verse: "Upon this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it." In the afternoon, Rev. Mr. Brown, pastor of the church, preached from the 27th chapter of Matthew, 51st verse:--And behold the vail of the temple was rent in twain, from the top to the bottom." Rev. Wm. A. Smith, D. D., delivered a sermon at night. His text was, "And the times of this ignorance God winked at; but now commandeth all men to repent. Because He hath appointed a day in which He will judge the world in righteousness, by that man whom He hath ordained, whereof He hath given assurance to all men, in that He hath raised him from the dead."--Acts 27-30, 34. The discourses are pronounced
the List will please say they are Advertised. Ladies' list. Anderson mrs M Alderslade mrs J M Allen mrs M A Adams mrs N F Alkins miss N W Anderson miss Cecilia Allen miss Nannie Allen miss C B Anderson miss B B Fall mrs Aug. Balley mrs Sempy Binford mrs Lucy A Bullock mrs Lucy Burroughs mrs G W Buchanan mrs Sarah E Ballard miss Fannie Barnes miss A M Barrett miss M A E Barber miss C A Brandon miss Lizzie Burch miss Marietta Brown mrs Sophia Brady mrs Brennan miss Burck miss Eliza Bates miss Pattie A Brooks miss Nancy Bowser miss Frances Crenshaw mrs F E Curry mrs Lucy L Crenshaw mrs Sarah B Campbell mrs E N G Carter mrs Mary E Caulfield mrs J A Caldwell mrs Caligan miss Maria Cullen miss Ellen Connolly miss Kate Cooke miss Sarah J Cook miss Mary A Cook miss Fannie Charters miss A V Clarke miss Delia Chandler miss M W Carter miss Georgie Carter mi
A Sepoy captive was so frightened in the India war that actually, under observation, within the space of half an hour, his hair became grey on every portion of his head; it having been, when first seen, of the glossy at black of the Bengali. Lieut. Boggs, formerly of the United States Army, has been appointed by Gov., Brown, Chief of Ordnance for the Republic of Georgia. A. B. Hendren, a Norfolk (Va.) boy, now editor of the Athens (Ala.) Banner, has been elected Mayor of that city. In Hancock county, Va., Geo. McPorter has beaten his uncle, William Porter, for the State Convention, 11 votes.
--I offer for sale my entire stock of Dry Goods, Shoes and Boots, which is very large, consisting of most every article generally found in a first-class Dry Goods Sotre. All colors of Merinos; Delaines; Alpacas; Black and Colored Silks; Linen Hdkfs, at 6 cts.; Irish Linen 25 cts.; fine Linen Bosoms 18 cts.; rich Worked Collars 25 cts.; Flannels 18 cts.; Calicoes at all prices; Ladies' and Gents' Shawls' Bed and Servants' Blankets; Cashmeres; Satinets; Kentucky Jeans, for boys and men, at half their value; Brown and Bleached Cotton, of every quality; sheeting and Pillow-case Muslin; Toweling and Table Cloths; Black, White and Mixed Woolen Yarn, at $1 per lb.; Under Shirts and Woolen Drawers, at prices from $1 and higher, Extension Skirts; Hosiery; Kid Gloves, black and colored, at 37½ cts.; Swiss Cambric and Check Muslin; and a great many more Goods, too numerous to mention, all of which you can buy to your satisfaction, by calling at No. 27 Main street. Joseph Strause. ja 19
--I offer for sale my entire stock of Dry Goods, Shoes and Boots, which is very large, consisting of most every article generally found in a first-class Dry Goods Store. All colors of Merinos; Delaines; Alpacas; Black and Colored Silks, Linen Hdkfs, at 6 cts.; Irish Linen 25 cts.; fine Linen Bosoms 18¾ cts.; rich Worked Collars 25 cts.; Flannels 18 cts.; Calicoes at all prices; Ladies' and Gents' Shawls; Bed and Servants' Blankets; Cashmeres; Satinets; Kentucky Jeans, for boys and men, at half their value; Brown and Bleached Cotton, of every quality; Sheeting and Pillow-case Muslin; Toweling and Table Cloths; Black, White and Mixed Woolen Yarn, at $1 per lb.; Under Shirts and Woolen Drawers, at prices from $1 and higher; Extension Skirts; Hosiery; Kid Gloves, black and colored, at 37½ cts.; Swiss Cambric and Check Muslin; and a great many more Goods, too numerous to mention, all of which you can buy to your satisfaction, by calling at No. 27 Main street. Joseph Strause. ja 19
sense, and a mouth betraying humor, irresolution, and a love of the good things of this life. His neck is inordinately long, having from two to ten more joints in it than any other neck — according to the sworn statements of reliable anatomists. When the Peace Congress called on him on Saturday night last, it was observed that his greeting of Judge Summers was very cordial. "I have heard a good deal about you occasionally, Judge." said he to him. Sunday morning, Old Buck was down at Brown's before nine o'clock. It is supposed he came to see Mr. Tyler. After remaining a few moments, he drove off rapidly in the direction of the Capitol. What he sought in that direction, nobody knows. His anxiety was explained, later in the day, by the report of an attack on Fort Pickens. Through Mr. Tyler's exertions, it is believed the attack will be postponed until Lincoln's policy is announced definitely. Rumor says that Wigfall will call on Old Abe and demand a categorical answer in re
--I offer for sale my entire stock of Dry Goods, Shoes and Boots, which is very large, consisting of most every article generally found in a first-class Dry Goods Store. All colores of Merinoes; Delaines; Alpacas; Black and Colored Silks; Linen Hdkfs. at 6 cts.; Irish Linen 25 cts.; fine Linen Bosoms 18¾cts.; rich Worked Collars 25 cts.; Flannels 18 cts.; Calicoes at all prices; Ladies' and Gents' Shawls; Bed and Servants' Blankets; Cashmeres; Satinets; Kentucky Jeans, for boys and men, at half their value; Brown and Bleached Cotton, of every quality; Sheeting and Pillow-case Muslin; Toweling and Table Cloths; Black, White and Mixed Woolen Yarn, at $1 per lb.; Under Shirts and Woolen Drawers, at prices from $1 and higher; Extension Skirts; Hosiery; Kid Gloves, black and colored, at 37½ cts.; Swiss Cambric and Check Muslin; and a great many more Goods, too numerous to mention, all of which you can buy to your satisfaction, by calling at No. 27 Main street. Joseph Strause. ja 19
The Georgia Branch Mint. --A correspondent of the Atlanta (Ga.) Intelligencer informs that paper that the Superintendent of the United States Branch Mint at Dahlonega now holds that property, together with $20,000 in gold coin, therein contained, for the State of Georgia, under a written order from Gov. Brown.
The seizure of ships at Savannah. The following is the letter written by Gov. Brown in ordering the seizure of the New York ships, at Savannah, on the 21st: Executive Department Milledgeville Feb. 21st, 1861. Sir On the fifth day of this month I directed you to call out sufficient military force, and seize all ships then in the harbor of Savannah belonging to citizens of the State of New York. The reasons for the seizure were briefly stated in the order. Citizens of this State had been robbed of their property by the police of New York, acting under the authority of that State. I had demanded the restoration of the property to its owners. The Governor of that State had given an evasive reply, excepting to the form of the demand sent by telegraph; which clearly evinced his disposition not to comply by ordering the restoration of the property. If the protection of this State were not in such case afforded to its citizens, it not only invited further aggressions upon
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ...