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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
agruder's district, the peninsula, the Sixth, Tenth and Sixteenth, under Alfred H. Colquitt, Lafayette McLaws and Howell Cobb, and Cobb's legion under T. R. R. Cobb, well sustained the reputation of the State. McLaws was promoted brigadier-general and assigned to important command, and Colonel Colquitt was given charge of a brigade including the Sixth and Sixteenth. Late in the year the Twenty-third regiment, unarmed, was sent forward to Yorktown. An unfortunate incident in the history of Cobb's legion is preserved in the official reports of General Magruder. It appears that a scouting party had been fired upon, and he had sent forward an ambuscading force to the vicinity of New Market bridge. While the troops were moving into position on the morning of November 13th, says Magruder, two of my vedettes approached the infantry position of the Georgia legion, at the time commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Garnett. From some cause, after a short parley, they turned and rode off at full
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
sion embracing his own and Law's brigades. At Fredericksburg the Eighteenth Georgia formed a part of T. R. R. Cobb's brigade. After the death of that noble officer, Colonel Wofford was promoted to brigadier-general and assigned to the command of Cobb's brigade, embracing the Sixteenth, Eighteenth and Twenty-fourth Georgia regiments, Cobb's Georgia legion, Phillips' Georgia legion, and the Third battalion of Georgia sharpshooters. He led this gallant brigade through the battle of ChancellorsviCobb's Georgia legion, Phillips' Georgia legion, and the Third battalion of Georgia sharpshooters. He led this gallant brigade through the battle of Chancellorsville, and did magnificent service in Longstreet's battle of July 2d at Gettysburg. Wofford's brigade drove back the brigades of Ayres and Barnes, gained the wheat fields and struggled toward the summit of Little Round Top, inflicting upon the enemy a loss double their own on that part of the field. When Longstreet went to help Bragg in September, Wofford's was one of the brigades that went with him. It did not reach Chickamauga in time to take part in the battle, but was frequently engaged in t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
must be sent. General Longstreet took the letter to his own quarters, where he found General T. R. R. Cobb, of this State. He gave it to General Cobb, pledging him to observe secrecy with regardGeneral Cobb, pledging him to observe secrecy with regard to it, but not saying a word as to the construction he placed on it. After reading the letter attentively General Cobb said there was no doubt in his mind that General McClellan wanted General LeeGeneral Cobb said there was no doubt in his mind that General McClellan wanted General Lee to help in the restoration of the Union by marching to Washington with the combined forces. General Longstreet told me of the circumstances more than once, and always added that he thoroughly coincided in General Cobb's views, but that General Lee, for the reason stated, declined to meet General McClellan. The copy which General Lee gave General Longstreet was sent, after the war, to Colonel ading Northern States gave large Democratic majorities. It was, therefore, not difficult for General Cobb and General Longstreet in 1862 to believe that in proposing an interview after the battle of
IX., 321. Clinton, Miss., II., 340, 344. Clinton guard, N. Y. Sixty-first Inf., III., 201. Cloth for uniforms, scarcity of, in the South, VIII., 142. Clothing: for the armies, VIII., 54, 56; supply depots, Confederate, VIII., 56; supply depots U. S. army, VIII., 56. Cloutersville, La., II., 352. Cloyds Mountain, Va., III., 320. Clustee, Fla, II., 349. Clymer, G., VI., 127. Cobb, H.: II., 92, 94, 96; III., 230; VII., 100, 122; X., 263. Cobb, T. R. R.: II., 81, 326, 328; X., 151. Cobb's Hill Tower, Petersburg, Va. , VIII., 310. Cobb's Point, N. C.: I., 356; Confederate battery at, VI., 312. Cobham, G. A., Jr. II., 302. Cocke, P. St. G., V., 64; X., 319. Cochrane, J., X., 223. Cockrell, F. M., II., 320; III., 340. Cockrell, J. H., X., 279. Cockrell's cavalry, Confederate. II., 320. Cockrill, M. S., V., 65. Code signals Viii., 316. Coe, C., IX., 351. Coehorn mortars
ongress was now ready to transact business. Messrs. Davis, Jones, Wigfall, and Orr came forward, took the oath, and subscribed to the Constitution. Mr. T. R. R. Cobb, of Georgia, said that as a quorum was present, and the Congress had been convened by the proclamation of the President, he moved that a committee of three be appointed to wait on the President and inform him that Congress was now ready to receive any communication from him. The President appointed Messrs. T. R. R. Cobb, Jas. Chesnut, Jr., and John Perkins, Jr., that committee. The committee retired, and in a few minutes returned and stated that the President would in a few minutes communicate in writing to Congress. Mr. T. R. R. Cobb offered the following resolution, which was adopted: Resolved, by the Confederate States of America, That the Secretary of Congress be authorized to appoint an assistant in the place of A. B. Clitherall, Esq., resigned. The President presented to Congress the a
n on the part of the Military Committee to stifle the bill alluded to. The bills for the organization of the military forces of the Confederate States have all been passed, and he did not consider the bill for the organization of a volunteer division at present of such importance as to demand the immediate attention of the committee. There is no doubt the Military Committee will give to the bill all the attention it merits, and most certainly they will report it back to Congress. Mr. T. R. R. Cobb, of Georgia, presented a memorial from a very worthy clergyman as to the propriety and necessity of appointing chaplains for the Army. The memorial, without being read, was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Ochiltree, of Texas, offered a memorial from citizens of Texas, on the necessity of establishing an armory in Madison county, in Texas. The memorial, without being read, was referred to the Military Committee. Mr. Khett, of South Carolina, then moved that Congress
nsas. A. H. Garland, Little Rock, Arkansas. W. W. Watkins, Carrolton, Arkansas. Florida. Jackson Morton, Milton, Florida. G. T. Ward, Tallahassee, Florida. J. B. Owens, Cottage P. O., Florida. Georgia. Robert Toombs, Washington, Georgia. Howell Cobb, Athens, Georgia. Francis S. Bartow, Savannah, Georgia. Martin J. Crawford, Columbus, Georgia. Eugenius A. Nisbet, Macon, Georgia. Benjamin H. Hill, Lagrange, Georgia. A. R. Wright, Rome, Georgia. T. R. R. Cobb, Athens, Georgia. A. H. Keenan, Milledgeville, Georgia. A. H. Stephens, Crawfordsville, Georgia. Louisiana. J. Perkins, Jr., Ashwood, Madison Parish, La. A. de Clouet, St. Martinsville, La. C. H. Conrad, New Orleans, La. D. F. Kenner, New River, Ascension Parish, La. E. Sparrow, Providence, Carroll Parish, La. H. Marshal, Blackjack, De Soto Parish, La. Mississippi. W. P. Harris, Jackson, Mississippi. W. Brooke, Vicksburg, Mississippi. J. A. Orr,--,
[from the Macon (Ga.) Telegraph.]Appeal to the Planters. The following eloquent appeal to our Planters, from a gallant and patriotic soldier, came to hand yesterday morning. Reed it, Planters of Georgia, and resolve that while others perit their lives, you will not be tardy to stake your fortunes for your country : Cant lee, Tanner's Creek Cross Roads, Virginia June 4, 1861. Hon. Howell Cone--Dear Sir --I have read with deep interest the appeal made by your self and Hon. T. R. R. Cobb, "to the Piaters of Georgia," in which you call upon them to subscribe a portion of their next crop in advance, and receive for the proceeds of its sale bonds of the Confederate States, running at twenty years, and bearing eight per cent. interest. As Agents of the Confederate States, you have made this call upon the Planters of our State to sustain the credit of the Government, and to provide means for the defence of our soil, our liberty, our families and our religion. I have also r
rto attaching to prominent men. The President of Congress, Hon. Howell Cobb, wee see from our Georgia exchanges, has been appointed a Colonel in the Provisional Army, and is raising a regiment in the sixth Congressional District of that State for the war. The Vice President of the Confederate States, Hon. Alex. H. Stevens, possesses too weak a frame to enter into military service; but he is devoting his appended intellectual powers in another and equally important service. T. R. R. Cobb, of Georgia, brother of the President of Congress, is raising a legion to be called "Tom Cobb's Legion." Louis, T. Wigfall, of Texas, has been for several weeks in our city, devoting his time and faculties in a most useful way, and we doubt if he can much longer be kept from a closer observation of the enemy, and a participation in the actual conflict. General Waul, of Texas, is likewise in Richmond, forwarding the interests of the people of his State, who are desirous of being
A Pathetic family. --The editor of the Raleigh (N. C.) Standard, thus writes to his paper: On our way to Suffolk, Va., we had the pleasure of traveling with Chief Justice Lumpkin, of Georgia, who has seven sons in the army in Virginia. The venerable and honored man was going, in vacation of his Court, with his wife, the mother of the boys, to see them. His son-in-law, T. R. R. Cobb, is on his way to Virginia in command of a Georgia regiment.
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