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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 9, 1863., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Feb. 18. Jefferson Davis was inaugurated President of the Southern Confederacy.--(Doc. 37.)
Feb. 23. President-elect Abraham Lincoln arrived in Washington. The published programme of his journey had been abandoned at Harrisburg, which city he left secretly last night.--(Doc. 38.)--Commercial, Feb. 23. United States property, to a great amount, together with the various army posts in Texas, were betrayed to that State by General Twiggs.--(Doc. 89.)--Times, Feb. 26. Feb. 23. President-elect Abraham Lincoln arrived in Washington. The published programme of his journey had been abandoned at Harrisburg, which city he left secretly last night.--(Doc. 38.)--Commercial, Feb. 23. United States property, to a great amount, together with the various army posts in Texas, were betrayed to that State by General Twiggs.--(Doc. 89.)--Times, Feb. 26.
Feb. 27. The Peace Convention submitted to the United States Senate a plan of adjustment involved in seven amendments to the Constitution of the United States.--(Doc. 40.)--Herald, March 4.
Feb. 28. Mr. Corwin's report from the committee of thirty-three came up for final passage in Congress this morning. It was agreed to amid thunders of applause from the galleries and the floor. As the vote proceeded, the excitement was intense, and on the announcement of the result, the inexpressible enthusiasm of the members and the crowded galleries found vent in uproarious demonstrations. All feel that it is the harbinger of peace.--(Doc. 41.)--Commercial, Feb. 28.
ion procession proceeded to the east portico of the capitol, in front of which a platform had been erected. Every available space in the vicinity was packed with a curious crowd of spectators. Every thing being in readiness, Senator Baker, of Oregon, came forward and introduced Mr. Lincoln in these simple words: Fellow-citizens: I introduce to you Abraham Lincoln, the President-elect of the United States of America. Mr. Lincoln then advanced to a small table, which had been placed for his accommodation, and proceeded to deliver his inaugural address, every word of which was distinctly heard on the outskirts of the swaying crowd. The oath of office was then administered to Mr. Lincoln by Chief Justice Taney; the procession was again formed, Mr. Lincoln was escorted to the White House, and was duly installed in the office of President of the United States.--(Doc. 42.) A State Convention declared Texas out of the Union and Governor Houston issued his proclamation to that effect.
relations of the Federal Government to Texas. Davis considers it due to international courtesy that the Government of the Confederate States (Texas included, after her withdrawal from the United States) should accord to the troops belonging to the Federal Government a reasonable time within which to depart from her territory. Should the Federal Government refuse to withdraw them, President Davis does not hesitate to say, that all the powers of the Southern Confederacy shall be promptly employed to expel them. General Waul says that the possibility of settling difficulties by a reconstruction of the old Union is never alluded to in the Congress, and that the proposal would receive about the same encouragement as a proposition to reannex Texas to the States of Mexico.--Evening Post, March 20. The President's inaugural meets with a varied reception throughout the country. The South pronounces it warlike, while a greater portion of the North considers it conservative.--(Doc. 43.)
March 9. The Southern Confederacy Congress passed an act for the establishment and organization of the army of the Confederate States.--(Doc. 44.)--Times, March 15.
March 12. The London News of to-day publishes a strong protest against a recognition of the Southern Confederacy by the British Government.--(Doc. 45.)
March 18. Supplies were cut off from Fort Pickens and the fleet in the Gulf of Mexico.--(Doc. 46.)
March 20. At about 7 o'clock this evening, Lieutentant Homer, in command of the Continentals, at drill was informed that there was a sloop lying at the wharf at the foot of Spanish alley in Mobile, which was laden with supplies for the United States fleet outside, between that place and Pensacola. A detachment of the company was on drill at the time, and Lieutenant Homer immediately ordered them down to the point mentioned, and then and there took charge of the little sloop Isabel. She was laden with beef, pork, barrels of eggs, etc. The person in charge acknowledged that these supplies were intended for the fleet outside.--Mobile Tribune, March 21. Corespondence between Mr. Secretary Seward and the Commissioners from the Confederate States is published.--(Doc. 47.)
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