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John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Chapter 10: foreign influence: summary (search)
s' statement; but the idea conveyed is true. Garrison's preeminence is incontestable. In agitation more completely consumed by his mission than Garrison. His life was sucked up into Anti-slavery. o be of enormous importance to this country. Garrison made five journeys to England, namely in 1833izabeth Pease and others. The later visit of Garrison to England in 1846, was due to a picturesque tant clergy from various parts of the world. Garrison and Thompson took, of course, no share in the within his own province of understanding. Garrison's personal relations with the British philantand the protection of the humbler classes. Garrison was better known to the working classes in Grever mentioned the names of Mr. Phillips or Mr. Garrison, that it did not call forth a storm of apprtentions of the Englishmen who, in 1867, gave Garrison a banquet, they did right to honor him; and tans, and by the dumbness of all the oracles. Garrison, at this juncture, is as empty as the prophet[18 more...]
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Epilogue (search)
ofundity and the complexity of the whole movement — the inevitability not only of the outcome, but of the process. That Garrison should have disapproved of the entry of Abolition into party politics, and that he should have raved like a hen upon theny, are never conclusive, never important. We cannot know the truth about any of these things. No one can be sure that Garrison did not exert greater influence upon practical politics through his dogma of nonresistance than he could have done throuorgotten among us; much is unknown that in any European country would be familiar. For instance, this very man, William Lloyd Garrison, is almost forgotten among us. He lived a life of heroism and of practical achievement; the beauty of his whole cwould have been prized thereafter as a national possession. But in America all that the educated man of to-day knows of Garrison is that he was one who held impractical views and used over-strong language during the Anti-slavery struggle. All thi
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Index (search)
Abolitionists in, 112, 113; Pro-slavery men in, 120, 121; Garrison mob in, the sticking-point of violence in, 118. And see ng, 205, 208, 210 ff., 218. Garibaldi, Guiseppe, 193. Garrison, Frances I. See Garrison, William L., Jr., and others. Garrison, William L., Jr., and others. Garrison, Wendell P. See Garrison, William L., Jr., and others. Garrison, William Lloyd, his relation to the AntislaveryGarrison, Wendell P. See Garrison, William L., Jr., and others. Garrison, William Lloyd, his relation to the Antislavery period, 6; his view of slavery and its relation to the history of the U. S. from 1830 to 1860, 6; the strongest man in AmerGarrison, William L., Jr., and others. Garrison, William Lloyd, his relation to the Antislavery period, 6; his view of slavery and its relation to the history of the U. S. from 1830 to 1860, 6; the strongest man in America, 7; his influence on the nation's course, 7, 8; effect of his first utterances on slavery, 17; and Channing, 28; at ChanGarrison, William Lloyd, his relation to the Antislavery period, 6; his view of slavery and its relation to the history of the U. S. from 1830 to 1860, 6; the strongest man in America, 7; his influence on the nation's course, 7, 8; effect of his first utterances on slavery, 17; and Channing, 28; at Channing's Church, 31,32; hisessential quality, 34; aggressiveness, 34ff.; first editorial in the Liberator, 35-41; early history251, 252; and the firing on in Fort Sumter, 259. Garrison, W. L., Jr., and others, Life of G., quoted, 106-108, 159 if., oted, on slavery, 13; III. Johnson, Oliver, his William Lloyd Garrison and his Times, quoted, 58, 63-65, 66-68, 69, 70, 7
Ernest Crosby, Garrison the non-resistant, Dedication (search)
Dedication To William Lloyd Garrison, Jr. a son worthy of his father
Ernest Crosby, Garrison the non-resistant, Author's note (search)
Author's note The facts relating to the life of Garrison and the anti-slavery struggle recited in this volume were gathered from the monumental work, William Lloyd Garrison, The Story of His Life Told by His Children (Four Volumes, Octavo, Houghton, Miffin and Company, Boston, Mass.), a fascinating book which should be foundWilliam Lloyd Garrison, The Story of His Life Told by His Children (Four Volumes, Octavo, Houghton, Miffin and Company, Boston, Mass.), a fascinating book which should be found upon the shelves of every public library in America. From lips that Sinai's trumpet blew We heard a tender under-song; Thy very wrath from pity grew, From love of man thy hate of wrong. Whittier, To Garrison. hildren (Four Volumes, Octavo, Houghton, Miffin and Company, Boston, Mass.), a fascinating book which should be found upon the shelves of every public library in America. From lips that Sinai's trumpet blew We heard a tender under-song; Thy very wrath from pity grew, From love of man thy hate of wrong. Whittier, To Garrison.
Ernest Crosby, Garrison the non-resistant, Chapter 1: the Liberator (search)
there the freedom of a race began. Lowell, To Garrison. Oliver Johnson gives a graphic descriptihe eaves of Merchants' Hall, Boston, in which Garrison printed the early numbers of his Liberator inday at the manual labor of their enterprise. Garrison was at this time only six-and-twenty, and he Northerner as well as of Southerner? William Lloyd Garrison was born at Newburyport, Massachusettsnd induced him to seek further education. As Garrison's venture at home was not sufficiently succes8, he happened to board at the house in which Garrison was living, and the latter was much impressedd inspired one more powerful than they were. Garrison was at the meeting, and was scandalized at th of the system which rendered them possible. Garrison's management of the new paper was most successuade him to join him in editing the Genius. Garrison did not hesitate for a moment to follow his fd unconditional emancipation. Until recently Garrison had believed in the gradual freeing of the sl[10 more...]
Ernest Crosby, Garrison the non-resistant, Chapter 2: the Boston mob (search)
s. In America it soon became clear, owing to Garrison's exposure of it, that colonization meant thedies and gentlemen to be present to welcome Mr. Garrison, the black advocate of emancipation from Am increase the number of his associates. When Garrison reached Boston, he found that there, too, cirn and although all pandemonium was let loose, Garrison became only more confident and determined. Frth, the influence and standing. Garrison! Garrison! was now the cry. We must have Garrison! OuGarrison! Out with him! Lynch him! The mob demanded that the antislavery society signboard be removed. The maedily torn to pieces. The mayor now besought Garrison to escape by the rear of the building, and thh the crowd, in which it was evident now that Garrison had some sympathizers, to the door of the neiorses and on the rioters, and by some miracle Garrison was deposited at the jail in safety and lockerove of the mob to put down such agitators as Garrison and those like him. The editor of the New En[15 more...]
Ernest Crosby, Garrison the non-resistant, Chapter 3: non-resistance, dissensions (search)
retra. Horace, Odes, 1.22. Any account of Garrison which failed to give due emphasis to his beliof war was much agitated about this time, and Garrison contended that if peace was invariably incumbegates met in September, 1838, at Boston, and Garrison as usual dominated the deliberations, and dre This greater cause (an admission indeed for Garrison) held its own for some years. The conventionkindled against them the just indignation of Garrison and many of his followers. They retorted thasensions. They continued for many years, but Garrison stood to his guns without flinching, and in to failed to vote was a traitor to the cause. Garrison, however, had conscientious scruples against with men in conventions and committee work? Garrison stoutly upheld their right on all occasions; seat among the spectators in the gallery. Garrison's policy against slavery was chiefly directedolidate anti-slavery opinion. Another aim of Garrison's was to persuade England to buy her cotton
Ernest Crosby, Garrison the non-resistant, Chapter 4: Constitution and conscience (search)
ld do it; and if I could do it by freeing some and leaving others alone, I would also do that. Garrison never allowed the Constitutional argument to obscure the moral obligation. He frankly acknowllined to believe that the Southerners must have had more respect for the outspoken anathemas of Garrison than for the truckling subserviency of time-serving politicians and tradesmen. The nonresistanThe blasphemy of wrong. We may readily imagine the frame of mind in which these events left Garrison. At the 4th of July celebration of the Abolitionists at Framingham, Massachusetts, in 1854, hefrom Anglo-Saxon blood; Frederick Douglass, of Rochester, black-man, from African blood; William Lloyd Garrison, of Boston, mulattoman, mixed race; Wendell Phillips, of Boston, white-man, merely from blood. He added that Garrison surpasses Robespierre and his associates, and borrowing his language apparently from a future generation, calls the members of the society Abolitionists, socialists, Sa
Ernest Crosby, Garrison the non-resistant, Chapter 5: the Civil war (search)
will subsisting between persons. Erasmus. Garrison's doctrine of non-resistance was put to the tellows who follow Atchison and Stringfellow. Garrison expressed his emphatic dissent from this assen as Dr. Leonard Bacon and Dr. Storrs, called Garrison an infidel of the most degraded class! When at last war became inevitable, Garrison deplored the martial spirit of many of the Abolitionists. , Peter and John. But these principles of Garrison did not prevent him, whenever war was actuallnd servility of a Southern slave plantation. Garrison applied these rules to the Civil War, and gavin their respective military districts, still Garrison saw deeper than most of his fellow reformers,ten to that in Charleston streets! exclaimed Garrison, and they both broke into tears. The Negroeslaring the abolition of slavery, was assured, Garrison made up his mind to bring the Liberator to a their total lack of influence proved how wise Garrison's action had been. He set up the last paragr[3 more...]
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