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The Daily Dispatch: May 2, 1864., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 21, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 6, 1860., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 15, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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a real letter. Then I inclosed it in an envelope, stating that it was a part of a set which had incidentally fallen into my hands. This envelope was written in a scrawny, scrawly, gentleman's hand. I put it into the office in the morning, directed to Mrs. Samuel E. Foote, and then sent word to Sis that it was coming, so that she might be ready to enact the part. Well, the deception took. Uncle Sam examined it and pronounced, ex cathedra, that it must have been a real letter. Mr. Greene (the gentleman who reads) declared that it must have come from Mrs. Hall, and elucidated the theory by spelling out the names and dates which I had erased, which, of course, he accommodated to his own tastes. But then, what makes me feel uneasy is that Elisabeth, after reading it, did not seem to be exactly satisfied. She thought it had too much sentiment, too much particularity of incident,she did not exactly know what. She was afraid that it would be criticised unmercifully. Now Elis
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe, Chapter 4: early married life, 1836-1840. (search)
espectable men of the city are invited by name to come together and consider the question whether they will allow Mr. Birney to continue his paper in the city. Mr. Greene says that, to his utter surprise, many of the most respectable and influential citizens gave out that they should go. He was one of the number they invited, t, while newspapers from abroad are pouring in their reprehensions of the disgraceful conduct of Cincinnati. Another time, I suspect, such men as Judge Burnet, Mr. Greene, and Uncle John will keep their fingers out of such a trap, and people will all learn better than to wink at a mob that happens to please them at the outset, or in any way to give it their countenance. Mr. Greene and Uncle John were full of wrath against mobs, and would not go to the meeting, and yet were cajoled into acting on that committee in the vain hope of getting Birney to go away and thus preventing the outrage. They are justly punished, I think, for what was very irresolute
xperience to the vastness of the undertaking. A mighty military genius, capable at once of comprehending and controlling the condition of things, would have upset the government in six months. Trammelled, confined, and baffled by ignorance and unbelief, it would have taken matters into its own hand. Besides, such prodigies do not appear every century. We were children in such a complicated and wide-sweeping struggle; and, like children, were compelled to learn to walk by many a stumble. Greene, next to Washington, was the greatest general our revolutionary war produced; yet, in almost his first essay, he lost Fort Washington, with its four thousand men, and seriously crippled his great leader. But Washington had the sagacity to discern his military ability beneath his failure, and still gave him his confidence. To a thinking man, that was evidently the only way for us to get a competent general-one capable of planning and carrying out a great campaign. Here was our vital errour
to South Carolina Quota of Revolutionary troops the South always behind General Greene's testimony Ramsay's history of the Revolution Military weakness of Southnemy's camp. At last, by the military genius and remarkable exertions of General Greene, a Northern man, who assumed the command of the Southern army, South Caroli in a few months more, as neither Whig nor Tory can live. To Lafayette, General Greene, under date of 29th December, 1780, describes the weakness of his troops: and properly equipped, does not amount to eight hundred men.—Johnson's life of Greene, vol. i. p. 340. Writing to Mr. Varnum, a member of Congress, he says:— rust the liberties of a people to such a precarious defence.— Johnson's Life of Greene, vol. i. p. 397. Nothing can be more authentic or complete than this testihe United States, and a citizen of South Carolina, in his elaborate Life of General Greene, speaking of negro slaves, makes the same unhappy admission. He says:—
the smoke of an enemy's camp. At last, by the military genius and remarkable exertions of General Greene, a Northern man, who assumed the command of the Southern army, South Carolina was rescued frll be depopulated in a few months more, as neither Whig nor Tory can live. To Lafayette, General Greene, under date of 29th December, 1780, describes the weakness of his troops: It is now wi properly clothed and properly equipped, does not amount to eight hundred men.—Johnson's life of Greene, vol. i. p. 340. Writing to Mr. Varnum, a member of Congress, he says:— There is a grn the world to trust the liberties of a people to such a precarious defence.— Johnson's Life of Greene, vol. i. p. 397. Nothing can be more authentic or complete than this testimony. Here, alsoupreme Court of the United States, and a citizen of South Carolina, in his elaborate Life of General Greene, speaking of negro slaves, makes the same unhappy admission. He says:— But the numbe
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
218, 219. Congress sustained Washington in disregarding the resolution. Xlv. The secret journals of Congress (vol. i., pp. 107, 110), March 29, 1779, show that the States of South Carolina and Georgia were recommended to raise immediately three thousand able-bodied negroes. That every negro who shall well and faithfully serve as a soldier to the end of the present war, and shall then return his arms, be emancipated and receive the sum of fifty dollars. Washington, Hamilton, Greene, Lincoln, and Lawrence, warmly approved of the measure. In 1783 the General Assembly of Virginia passed An act directing the emancipation of certain slaves who have served as soldiers in this war. We next give an extract from an act of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, in General Assembly, February session, 1778:— Whereas, for the preservation of the rights and liberties of the United States, it is necessary that the whole powers of Government should be exerted i
Xlv. The secret journals of Congress (vol. i., pp. 107, 110), March 29, 1779, show that the States of South Carolina and Georgia were recommended to raise immediately three thousand able-bodied negroes. That every negro who shall well and faithfully serve as a soldier to the end of the present war, and shall then return his arms, be emancipated and receive the sum of fifty dollars. Washington, Hamilton, Greene, Lincoln, and Lawrence, warmly approved of the measure. In 1783 the General Assembly of Virginia passed An act directing the emancipation of certain slaves who have served as soldiers in this war. We next give an extract from an act of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, in General Assembly, February session, 1778:— Whereas, for the preservation of the rights and liberties of the United States, it is necessary that the whole powers of Government should be exerted in recruiting the Continental battalions; and whereas his Excellency General Was
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: fiction II--contemporaries of Cooper. (search)
al plays of Shakespeare, that he produced popular histories of South Carolina and popular biographies of Marion, Captain John Smith, the Chevalier Layard, and General Greene, and that he kept up a ceaseless flood of contributions to periodicals. His range of interest and information was large, but he commonly dealt with American,Mellichampe, which is nearly parallel to that of Katherine Walton, the proper sequel of The partisan, takes place in the interval between Camden and the coming of Greene; The scout, originally called The Kinsmen (1841), illustrates the period of Greene's first triumphs; The sword and the Distaff (1852), later known as Woodcraft, fGreene's first triumphs; The sword and the Distaff (1852), later known as Woodcraft, furnishes a kind of comic afterpiece for the series. Simms subsequently returned to the body of his theme and produced The Forayers (1853) and its sequel Eutaw (1856) to do honour to the American successes of the year 1781. Of these The scout is perhaps the poorest, because of the large admixture of Simms's cardinal vice, horri
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
Golden Hind, 1 Goldsmith, 162, 163, 174, 177, 181, 233, 234, 235, 238, 254, 279, 305 Good news from New England, 19 Goodrich, S. G., 240 Gookin, Daniel, 25, 27 Gordon, Thomas, 118 n. Gospel, the, 133 Gospel order revived, the, 55 Graham, Rev., David, 234 Grant, Anne McV., 311 Grave, 263, 271 Gray, Thomas, 171, 176, 177, 181, 183, 276, 278 Greeley, Horace, 276 Green, Rev., Joseph, 153, 160 Green Mountain boy, the, 228 Green Mountain boys, the, 310 Greene, General, 315 Greenfield Hill, 163, 164, 165 Grenville, George, 126 Greyslaer, 225 n., 310 Gridley, Jeremy, 114, 121 Gronov, J. F. (Gronovius), 195 Grotius, 193 Group, the, 175, 217, 218 Growth of Thanatopsis, the, 262 n. Grund, F. G., 190 Guardian, 116 Gulliver's travels, 118 Guy Mannering, 292 Guy Rivers, 314 Gyles, John, 7 H Hackett, J. H., 221, 228, 231 Haie, Edward, 1 Hakluyt, Richard, I, 3, 16, 18 Hall, Captain, Basil, 207 Hall, David, 96
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter 1: Cambridge and Newburyport (search)
all the moisture together and so we had a party of Hydropaths. Some came in tubs, others paddled in punts, and the most desperate invalids came in douches through the ceiling. We had large pails of water for supper. There was Miss Gibbs and Mrs. Greene and the very Reverend Mr. Berteau with a sharp nose, and Lieutenant Greene, of the navy, and Lieutenant Ehninger (think of that ) of the army, who was in the Mexican War (think of that!) and was wounded and left on the field for dead and afterLieutenant Greene, of the navy, and Lieutenant Ehninger (think of that ) of the army, who was in the Mexican War (think of that!) and was wounded and left on the field for dead and afterwards made Lieutenant instead (think of that 11), and is a commonplace and uninteresting mortal, after all. .. . Hydropaths keep early hours, and even this broke up soon after ten. Thus we find resources indoors and sometimes run out between the drops. In the evening Louisa plays us songs without words and spirit waltzes and Erlkings and other things tender and terrible. December 19, 1851 Wednesday night I lectured at Milford, Massachusetts. On the way up from Framingham . .. I observed
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