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From Washington. Washington, Feb. 1. --It is reported that Col. Hayne, having received dispatches from Gov. Pickens, has brought the subject of the evacuation of Fort Sumter before the Administration. Horatio King has been nominated to the Senate as Postmaster-General.
From Washington. Washington, Feb. 4. --Col. Hayne intended to leave to-day, but has delayed his departure until Wednesday, having been informed that the President is preparing a reply to his communication. Senator Wigfall and others have telegraphed to Montgomery, urging Alex. H. Stephens for President of the Southern Confederacy, in order to conciliate the conservatives. Secretary Black will be nominated for Associate Judge of the Supreme Court, to supply the vacancy occasioned by the death of Judge Daniel.
The ultimatum of South Carolina refused by the General Government. Washington, Feb, 7.--The N. Y. Herald's correspondent says the President's reply to Col. Hayne was transmitted yesterday. It calls for an answer from Hayne, which will be made immediately. This will close the correspondence. The Government refuses to comply with the demand of South Carolina for the surrender of Fort Sumter. All hope of a peaceable solution of the question is abandoned. There has been an apparent disposHayne, which will be made immediately. This will close the correspondence. The Government refuses to comply with the demand of South Carolina for the surrender of Fort Sumter. All hope of a peaceable solution of the question is abandoned. There has been an apparent disposition on both sides to delay matters in hope an amicable adjustment might be made, leading to peace in Charleston harbor, but the matter cannot further be postponed. Carolina has presented her ultimatum, and the Government has positively refused to comply.
een Douglas and Fessenden. The President sent a message enclosing the correspondence with Col. Hayne relative to Fort Sumter. Morrill's tariff bill was taken up and read. Adjourned. lls were acted on. A message was received covering the correspondence of the President with Hayne. The House refused to consider the report of the Committee of Thirty-Three. Mr. Hattonated Crittenden's resolutions. The House took a recess until 7 o'clock. Departure of Col. Hayne for South Carolina. Washington,Feb. 8.--Col. Hayne, South Carolina Commissioner, and LieutCol. Hayne, South Carolina Commissioner, and Lieut. Hall, bearer of dispatches to Maj. Anderson, left this morning, carrying with them the President's ultimatum, which it is believed must prove unsatisfactory to South Carolina. The President wilSouth Carolina. As to selling Fort Sumter to the State of South Carolina, as suggested by Col. Hayne, the President says he would no more sell Fort Sumter to that State than he could sell the Cap
ials were received. A resolution to extend McCormick's Reaper patent was discussed and carried. During the debate sharp language passed between Douglas and Fessenden. The President sent a message enclosing the correspondence with Col. Hayne relative to Fort Sumter. Morrill's tariff bill was taken up and read. Adjourned. House.--A communication was received announcing that the President had signed the bill authorizing the extension of the Alexandria, London and Hampshire Railroad to Georgetown. Private bills were acted on. A message was received covering the correspondence of the President with Hayne. The House refused to consider the report of the Committee of Thirty-Three. Mr. Hatton, of Tenn, made a conciliatory speech. Mr. Kellogg made a speech in favor of his resolutions, amending the Constitution. He said he repudiated his party platform for the sake of the Union. He did not speak to the politicians, but to the people of all
Departure of Col. Hayne for South Carolina. Washington,Feb. 8.--Col. Hayne, South Carolina Commissioner, and Lieut. Hall, bearer of dispatches to Maj. Anderson, left this morning, carrying with them the President's ultimatum, which it is believed must prove unsatisfactory to South Carolina. The President will probably tCol. Hayne, South Carolina Commissioner, and Lieut. Hall, bearer of dispatches to Maj. Anderson, left this morning, carrying with them the President's ultimatum, which it is believed must prove unsatisfactory to South Carolina. The President will probably transmit his correspondence to Congress to-day. He has somewhat retreated from the position assumed of "protecting the public property," and now rejects the demand of South Carolina on the ground that the Federal Government has exclusive jurisdiction in Fort Sumter, which is incompatible with the right of eminent domain in South Carolina. As to selling Fort Sumter to the State of South Carolina, as suggested by Col. Hayne, the President says he would no more sell Fort Sumter to that State than he could sell the Capitol of the United States to the State of Maryland. He concludes his reply with the following emphatic declaration: "If, with all th
he city on Saturday on his return from Washington. He proceeded to Fort Sumter, accompanied by Cols. F. J. Moses, Jr., and M. A. Moore of the Executive Staff. Col. Hayne has also arrived. A photographer, by special permission of the Governor, visited Fort Sumter on Friday, and succeeded in taking several life-like likenesse instant. He writes in good spirits, and is fully prepared for any emergencies that may arise. He had not heard how the negotiations between the President and Col. Hayne had terminated.--He knew, however, for he had already been informed, what position the Administration would take in regard to the demands of South Carolina. Hes instructions some time ago through Lieut. Talbott, and he has been preparing and arranging his plans accordingly. He expects to be attacked immediately after Col. Hayne's return. He says, judging from the activity of the people and the extensive preparations which are being made, that they will present a pretty formidable
From Charleston.[special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Charleston, Feb. 12th, 1861. For two days past (especially on Sunday) there were startling reports flying about the city, to the effect that Col. Hayne and Lieut. Hall having returned from Washington, and Hayne's mission proving abortive, now the Fort would have to be taken. Such were the impressions on the minds of almost all men, even those who had adhered to the opinion that a conflict was most improbable, and, therefore, I Hayne's mission proving abortive, now the Fort would have to be taken. Such were the impressions on the minds of almost all men, even those who had adhered to the opinion that a conflict was most improbable, and, therefore, I lost no time, early Monday morning, to ascertain the truth of all these reports from "headquarters," and, to my great joy, found that no such thing had been contemplated, for the reason that the Constitution of the Provisional Government had been adopted a President and Vice President had been elected, and the war power, both offensive and defensive, was invested in the hands of the Government, to which South Carolina, of right belongs hence this State would take no step in the matter, except t
reply of the 1st inst., (the original, No. 7) I also transmit herewith a copy of my letter to the Governor of Alabama, of the 3d inst., (No. 8,) and his reply of the same date, (No. 9.) The favorable reception given to my mission by the Executive authorities of the two States last mentioned was communicated to Mr. Tyler from Montgomery, both by telegrams and letter. Just previous to my leaving that city, I received from him a telegraphic dispatch, informing me of the return of Col. Hayne to South Carolina, without accomplishing, as I inferred, the object of his mission, and re-urging the importance of securing, if possible, forbearance on the part of that State from hostile acts. I had an immediate interview accordingly with Messrs. Rhett, Barnwell and Chestnut, then members from South Carolina of the Southern Congress, sitting in Montgomery, and had the pleasure of receiving assurances from them as I had from Col. Memminger a day or two before, satisfying me that t
and the Homeric poems, which seems to be the result of his own reflections after having read all that has been written on the subject. It will be pleasing, doubtless, to any reader of Homer, who has more poetry than skepticism in his composition, to know that he recognizes the identity of the old bard, and believes that the interpolations upon his works have been much fewer and much less important than his decriers have been willing to admit. He rejects, without hesitation, the doctrine of Hayne, that these noble poems were the work of a number of obscure and insignificant bards. It has often been remarked as a singular coincidence, that the two poets who are thought to have surpassed all others in point of genius, should, while the whole world is filled with their renown, have left no traces of their individual existence. Homer lived and sang many ages before the first stone had been laid for the foundation of the Parthenon — his poems had been the admiration of the civilize
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