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ed through the war. 15 163 178 6 166 172 350 Humphreys's Third. Aug., ‘61 3d New Hampshire Re 12th New Hampshire 11 170 181 1 138 139 320 Humphreys's Third. Sept., ‘62 13th New Hampshire 5 ‘61 1st Massachusetts 8 134 142 1 78 79 221 Humphreys's Third. May, ‘61 2d Massachusetts Ree61 16th Massachusetts 16 134 150 2 93 95 245 Humphreys's Third. July, ‘61 17 Massachusetts Re ‘62 120th New York 11 140 151 3 179 182 333 Humphreys's Third. Aug., ‘62 121st New York 14 212 ., ‘61 5th New Jersey 12 126 138   85 85 223 Humphreys's Third. Aug., ‘61 6th New Jersey 3 124 127 1 71 72 199 Humphreys's Third. Aug., ‘61 7th New Jersey Reenlisted and served through the ved through the war. 9 167 176 1 109 110 286 Humphreys's Third. Oct., ‘61 9th New Jersey Reen‘62 11th New Jersey 11 131 142   107 107 249 Humphreys's Third. Aug., ‘62 12th New Jersey 9 168 Enlisted for nine months. 1 30 31   34 34 65 Humphreys's Fifth. Aug., ‘62 127th Pennsylvania
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 14: the greatest battles of the war — list of victories and defeats — chronological list of battles with loss in each, Union and Confederate. (search)
rant, as a whole, were really larger than these figures indicate. On April 30, 1864, there were in the Army of the Potomac 19,095 men on extra or daily duty, and 931 more in arrest, all of whom were present with Grant's army at tihe Willderness, in addition to the number who were present for duty equipped. The Army of the Potomac, according to the morning report of April 30, 1864, had an aggregate present of 127,471, not including the Ninth Corps. The Virginia Campaign of ‘64 and ‘65: Humphreys; pp. 408-411. As regards the loss in the Union armies, the greatest battles of the war were: Date. Battle. Killed. Wounded. Missing. Aggregate. July 1-3, 1863. Gettysburg 3,070 14,497 5,434 23,001 May 8-18, 1864. Spotsylvania 2,725 13,416 2,258 18,399 May 5-7, 1864. Wilderness 2,246 12,037 3,383 17,666 Sept. 17, 1862. Antietam Not including South Mountain or Crampton's Gap. 2,108 9,549 753 12,410 May 1-3, 1863. Chancellorsville 1,606 9,762 5,919 17,287 Sept. 19
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
ision at Fredericksburg, casualties in 35 Hancock's Veteran Corps, total enrollment of 527 Hancock's Veteran Corps, organization of 66 Harker's Brigade 121 Harrow's Brigade, loss at Gettysburg 121 Heavy artillery regiments, size and strength of 5, 39 Heavy artillery regiments, maximum losses in 6 Heckman's Star Brigade 120 Height of American volunteers 62 Higginson, Colonel T. W. 53 Hodge, Wm. Barwick, quoted 24 Horses killed in light batteries 463 Humphreys, Gen. A. A., quoted 541 Illinois regiments, tabulation of, with deaths in each 504 Illinois regiments in the Mexican war 505 Illinois regiments, synonyms of 506 Indian regiments, U. S. A. 61, 522 Indian Nations, enrollment of troops 533 Indian fighting, atrocities committed 517 Indiana minute men in the war 501 Indiana generals 504 Indiana regiments, tabulation of, with deaths in each 500 Indiana regiments, synonyms of 501 Indiana regiments, reenlistments in 503
, 576. Howard, Otis Woolworth, II, 493. Howard, Rowland B. (brother), I, 41, 71, 81, 119, 390, 443; II, 555. Howard, Rowland B. (father), I, 4, 11. Howard, Seth, I, 3, 4, 7, 20. Howard, Stillman, I, 16. Howard University, II, 390-401. Howard University, President of, II, 452-455. Howe, Albion P., I, 382, 383. Howland, William C., II, 571, 572. Hubbard, George H., I, 472. Hubbard, Thomas H., I, 43. Huger, Benjamin, 1, 231. Hughes, H. Y., II, 587. Humphreys, Andrew A., I, 342,343, 425, 449. Humphreys, Richard, II, 394. Hunt, Henry J., I, 320, 323, 348, 352, 381, 422, 425, 435. Hunter, David, I, 145, 149, 152-154, 157, 158, 181, 201; II, 168. Hurlbut, Stephen A., II, 188, 216. Hutchinson Family, I, 201. Indians, in the Northwest, II, 474-484. Ingalls, Rufus, II, 479. Irwin, William H., I, 299, 300. Iverson, Alfred, I, 416; II, 55. Jackson, C. Feger, I, 335. Jackson, Huntington W., I, 522. Jackson, J. W., I, 104.
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—the war on the Rapidan. (search)
e found Slocum there with the greater portion of the three corps that had crossed the Rapidan; Humphreys' division, forming the rear-guard, was to arrive on the morning of the following day, May 1; Ction of Banks' Ford, by following the left bank of Mott's Run, through a long range of hills. Humphreys led the march, Griffin following him over the same route: Sykes, with the third division of thersaries by a very brisk fire, but they dare not attack them in full force, for they have seen Humphreys' battalions drawn up on the other side of Mott's Run, which threaten to outflank them in their Chancellorsville, as well as that of Sykes; Meade formed the left, along the River Road, with Humphreys' and Griffin's divisions. In thus persisting in defending the approaches to Chancellorsvillad passed over from the left to the right of the army-lines about one o'clock in the morning. Humphreys was deployed to the right of Berry. Griffin, then Sykes, prolonged the line on each side of t
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Pennsylvania. (search)
Burling's brigade had filled up the ranks of Humphreys' division: not being entirely satisfied witheserve in the rear of Ward and De Trobriand; Humphreys, leaving to his two other brigades the formathey can place on the Warfield ridge against Humphreys' two brigades and that of Graham. Finally, enaces his flank. It is near seven o'clock. Humphreys has only two brigades with him; his left is Hays' division for the purpose of supporting Humphreys, and, taking with him Willard's brigade of t Hill as much as possible in order to assist Humphreys. All these troops, once assembled upon thken and all directions confused: they follow Humphreys, and although, according to Hill's orders, tvision scales at last the slopes along which Humphreys and Gibbon are posted. Wilcox, on the righthe retreating soldiers he was pursuing meets Humphreys in good order on one side and Hancock's reses and Barksdale's brigades, commanded by Colonel Humphreys, advance a little: the latter deploys a [25 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Third winter. (search)
been replaced by General French, one of the old regulars, grown gray in the service, and almost worn out, of a slow and exacting mind, and having in his favor no important military exploit; sickness has forced Birney to leave his division, and Humphreys has left his for the staff. Finally, recruits who have arrived from Washington demand the removal of their commander, a recently-improvised general; and it has been foolishly conceived, in order to take him away from them, to place him at the the direction of Strasburg, is hesitating anew. The line of Ward's division being broken by the march, he re-forms it on the left to avert an imaginary danger, and pushes forward the Second division under the command of General Prince, who is Humphreys' successor. When at length he moves forward the day is already far spent, and he still retards Prince's march by the exaggerated importance he gives to his skirmishing lines. Reaching the strong position of Walker, the Federals engage him wit
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 6 (search)
d Pa. 3d Brigade, Col. Stockton—20th Me., 16th Mich., 12th, 17th, 44th N. Y., 83d Pa. Artillery—Mass. Art. (Bats. C, E), R. I. Art. (Bat. C), 5th U. S. Art. (Bat. D). 2d division, Maj.-gen. Sykes. 1st brigade (regulars), Brig.-gen. Ayres—3d, 4th, 12th, 14th U. S. Inf. 2d Brigade, (regulars), Col. Burbank—2d, 6th, 7th, 11th, 17th U. S. Inf. 3d brigade, Col. O'Rorke—5th, 140th, 146th N. Y. Artillery—1st O. Art. (Bat. L), 5th U. S. Art. (Bat. I). 3d division, Brig.-gen. Humphreys. 1st brigade, Brig.-gen. Tyler—91st, 126th, 129th, 134th Pa. 2d brigade, Col. Allabach—123d, 131st, 133d, 155th Pa. Artillery—1st N. Y. Art. (Bat. C), 1st U. S. Art. (Bat. E). Sixth army corps, Major-general Sedgwick. 1st division, Brig.-gen. Brooks. 1st brigade, Brig.-gen. Torbert—1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, 15th, 23d N. J. 2d brigade, Brig.-gen. Bartlett—5th Me., 16th, 27th, 121st N. Y., 96th Pa. 3d brigade, Brig.-gen. Russell, 18th, 32d N. Y., 49th,
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 7 (search)
., 1st Del., 10th, 12th, 108th, 136th N. Y. 3d brigade Willard, 37th, 111th, 125th, 126th N. Y. Corps artillery, Captain Hazard, 24 cannon. Third corps. Major-General Sickles. 1st division, Brigadier-general Birney. 1st brigade, Graham, 57th, 63d, 68th, 105th, 114th, 141st Pa. 2d brigade Ward, 4th, 5th Me., 20th Ind., 99th Pa., 86th, 124th N. Y., 1st, 2d Berdan Sharpshooters. 3d brigade Trobriand, 17th Me., 3d, 5th Mich., 40th N. Y., 110th Pa. 2d division, Brigadier-general Humphreys. 1st brigade, Carr, 1st, 11th, 16th Mass., 12th N. H., 11th N. Y., 26th Pa. 2d brigade Brewster, 70th, 71st, 72d, 73d, 74th, 120th N. Y. 3d brigade Burling, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th N. J., 115th Pa. Corps artillery, Captain Randolph, 5 batteries, 30 cannon. Fifth corps. Major-General Sykes. 1st division, Brigadier-general Barnes. 1st brigade, Tilton, 18th, 22d Mass., 118th Pa. 2d brigade Sweitzer, 9th, 32d Mass., 4th Mich., 62d Pa. 3d brigade Vincent, 16th Mi
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Addenda by the editor (search)
Third brigade. Colonel Patrick H. O'Rorke. 5th New York. 140th New York. 146th New York. Artillery. Captain Stephen H. Weed. 1st Ohio Light Artillery, Battery L. 5th U. S. Artillery, Battery I. Third division. Brigadier-general Andrew A. Humphreys. First brigade Brig.-gen. Erastus B. Tyler. 91st Pennsylvania. 126th Pennsylvania. 129th Pennsylvania. 134th Pennsylvania. Second brigade. Colonel Peter H. Allabach. 123d Pennsylvania. 131st Pennsylvania. 133d Pennsaine. 4th Maine. 20th Indiana. 99th Pennsylvania. 86th New York. 124th New York. Third brigade. Colonel P. R. de Trobriand. 3d Michigan. 5th Michigan. 40th New York. 17th Maine. 110th Pennsylvania. Second division. Brigadier-general A. A. Humphreys. First brigade. Brig.-gen. Joseph B. Carr. 1st Massachusetts. 11th Massachusetts. 16th Massachusetts. 26th Pennsylvania. 11th New Jersey. 84th Pennsylvania. Not engaged. 12th New Hampshire. Second brigade. Col. Wi
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