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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 9.97 (search)
scription of this fighting in Lookout Valley: The engagement of Wauhatchie, or Lookout Valley, was of minor importance; but it is well to have errors corrected. General Geary's Federal division was not attacked by Longstreet's corps, but by Jenkins's South Carolina brigade, commanded by Colonel (afterward General) John Bratton. No other troops fired a shot at Geary's men that night. The battle lasted about one hour and a half, and was brought to a close on account of General Howard's advhe writer, acting assistant adjutant-general on Colonel Bratton's staff, was wounded and taken from the field at the close of the battle, and did not observe any disorder. General Howard was opposed by a small force, and made such progress that Jenkins's brigade was in danger of being cut off from the crossing over Lookout Creek. They were ordered out when they seemed to be getting the better of General Geary, who was surprised by the night attack, and no doubt thought himself greatly outnum
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Knoxville, Tenn.: November 17th-December 4th, 1863. (search)
, 56==182. Bryan's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Goode Bryan: 10th Ga., Lieut.-Col. Willis C. Holt; 50th Ga., Col. P. McGlashan; 51st Ga., Col. E. Ball; 53d Ga., Col. James P. Simms (w). Brigade loss: k, 27; w, 121; m, 64==212. Hood's division, Brig.-Gen. Micah Jenkins. Jenkins's Brigade, Col. John Bratton: 1st S. C., Col. F. W. Kilpatrick; 2d S. C. Rifles, Col. Thomas Thomson; 5th S. C., Col. A. Coward; 6th S. C.----; Hampton (S. C.) Legion, Col. M. W. Gary; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharpshooters, Col. JosJenkins's Brigade, Col. John Bratton: 1st S. C., Col. F. W. Kilpatrick; 2d S. C. Rifles, Col. Thomas Thomson; 5th S. C., Col. A. Coward; 6th S. C.----; Hampton (S. C.) Legion, Col. M. W. Gary; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharpshooters, Col. Joseph Walker. Brigade loss: k, 22; w, 109; m, 5==136. Robertson's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Jerome B. Robertson: 3d Ark., Col. Van H. Manning; 1st Tex., Col. A. T. Rainey; 4th Tex., Col. J. C. G. Key; 5th Tex., Col. R. M. Powell. Brigade loss: k, 9; w, 18; m, 6==33. Law's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. McIver Law: 4th Ala., Col. P. D. Bowles; 15th Ala., Col. W. C. Oates; 44th Ala., Col. W. F. Perry; 47th Ala., Col. M. J. Bulger; 48th Ala., Col. James L. Sheffield. Brigade loss: k, 15; w, 69; m, 8==92. Ander
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., From the Wilderness to Cold Harbor. (search)
took the left of the road, with Gregg's brigade in front, Benning's behind it, Law's next, and Jenkins's following. As the Texans in the front line swept past the batteries where General Lee was st's corps] were advancing through the pines with apparently resistless force, when Brigadier-General Micah Jenkins, C. S. A., killed May 6, 86. from Tintype. Gregg's eight hundred Texans, regaras about to be repeated. General Longstreet rode forward and prepared to press his advantage. Jenkins's fresh brigade was moved forward on the Plank road to renew the attack, supported by Kershaw'se now in line south of the road and almost parallel to it. Longstreet and Kershaw rode with General Jenkins at the head of his brigade as it pressed forward, when suddenly the quiet that had reigned single volley, which lost to them all the fruits of the splendid work they had just done. General Jenkins was killed and Longstreet seriously wounded by our own men. The troops who were following t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate Army. (search)
icial records. 18th Miss., Capt. W. H. Lewis;. 21st Miss., Col. D. N. Moody. Wofford's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William T. Wofford: 16th Ga.,----; 18th Ga.,----; 24th Ga.,----; Cobb's Ga. Legion,----; Phillips Ga. Legion,----; 3d Ga. Battalion Sharp-shooters,----. Bryan's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Goode Bryan: 10th Ga., Col. Willis C. Holt; 50th Ga., Col. P. McGlashan; 51st Ga., Col. E. Ball; 53d Ga., Col. James P. Simms. field's division, Maj.-Gen. Charles W. Field. Jenkins's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Micah Jenkins: 1st S. C., Col. James R. Hagood: 2d S. C. (Rifles), Col. R. E. Bowen; 5th S. C., Col. A. Coward; 6th S. C., Col. John Bratton; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharp-shooters, Col. Joseph Walker. Anderson's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George T. Anderson: 7th Ga.,----; 8th Ga.,----; 9th Ga.,----; 11th Ga.,----; 59th Ga., Lieut.-Col. B. H. Gee. Law's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. McIver Law: 4th Ala., Col. P. D. Bowles; 15th Ala.,----; 44th Ala., Col. W. F. Perry; 47th Ala.,----; 48th Ala., Lieut.-Col. W. M. Hardw
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
s 14 87 -- 101 26th North Carolina Kirkland's Heth's 16 83 -- 99 Wauhatchie, Tenn.             Oct. 27, 1863.             5th South Carolina Bratton's Jenkins's 9 84 9 102 ----Hampton Legion Bratton's Jenkins's 8 65 12 85 Mine Run, Va.             Nov. 27, 1863.             3d North Carolina Steuart's JohnsoJenkins's 8 65 12 85 Mine Run, Va.             Nov. 27, 1863.             3d North Carolina Steuart's Johnson's 7 65 -- 72 4th Virginia Walker's Johnson's 7 48 4 59 Olustee, Fla.             Feb. 20, 1864.             32d Georgia Harrison's Finnegan's 15 149 -- 164 64th Georgia Harrison's Finnegan's 17 88 2 107 2d Florida Battalion Harrison's Finnegan's 12 95 2 109 There are no muster-out rolls of the Confederate Green Killed at Pleasant Hill. Brigadier-General W. R. Scurry Killed at Jenkins Ferry. Brigadier-General John M. Jones Killed at Wilderness. Brigadier-General Micah Jenkins Killed at Wilderness. Brigadier-General L. A. Stafford Killed at Wilderness. Brigadier-General Abner Pe
enerals killed in battle group no. 7 Brigadier-generals Abner Perrin Spotsylvania May 12, 1864. W. E. Jones, Piedmont June 5. 1864. George doles, Bethesda Church May 30, 1864. Robert H. Anderson, Antietam October 6, 1862. John H. Morgan, Greenville September 4, 1864. John R. Chambliss, Jr., Deep Bottom August 16, 1864. Junius Daniel, Spotsylvania died May 13, 1864. James B. Gordon, Yellow Tavern May 11, 1864. J. C. Saunders, Weldon Railroad August 21, 1864. Micah Jenkins, Wilderness May 6, 1864. C. H. Stevens, Peach tree Creek July 20, 1864. Samuel Benton, Esra Church July 29, 1864. Some casualties of Confederate regiments General Marcus J. Wright, Confederate States Army At the time when Lieutenant-Colonel William F. Fox, U. S. V., published his valuable and exceedingly accurate work, entitled Regimental losses of the American Civil War, 1861-1865, many regimental reports were missing or inaccessible, so that this work, in many respects a st
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), General officers of the Confederate Army: a full roster compiled from the official records (search)
. Hodge, Geo. B., Nov. 20, 1863. Hogg, Joseph L., Feb. 14, 1862. Hoke, Robert F., Jan. 17, 1863. Hood, John B., Mar. 3, 1862. Huger, Benjamin, June 17, 1861. Humes, W. Y. C., Nov. 16, 1863. Humphreys, B. G., Aug. 12, 1863. Hunton, Eppa, Aug. 9, 1863. Iverson, Alfred, Nov. 1, 1862. Jackson, Alfred E., Feb. 9, 1863. Jackson, H. R., June 4, 1861. Jackson, John K., Feb. 13, 1862. Jackson, Wm. A., Dec. 19, 1864. Jackson, Wm. H., Dec. 29, 1862. Jenkins, Albert G., Aug. 5, 1862. Jenkins, Micah, July 22, 1862. Johnston, R. D., Sept. 1, 1863. Jones, John M., May 15, 1863. Jones, John R., June 23, 1862. Jones, William E., Sept. 19, 1862. Jordan, Thomas, April 14, 1862. Kelly, John H., Nov. 16, 1863. Kirkland, W. W., Aug. 29, 1863. Lane, James H., Nov. 1, 1862. Lane, Walter P., Mar. 17, 1865. Law, Evander M., Oct. 3, 1862. Lawton, Alex. R., April 13, 1861. Leadbetter, D., Feb. 27, 1862. Lee, Edwin G., Sept. 20, 1864. Lewis, Joseph H., Sept. 30, 1863. Liddell, St. J.
ed W. Smith, major. The Forty-first had but seven companies. There was a cavalry regiment of eight companies, without field officers, and a battalion of field artillery of five companies, without field officers. Of the officers named, Mahone afterward became major-general, and Pryor, Weisiger, Colston and Chambliss, brigadier-generals. Col. Robert Johnston, commanding the cavalry at Cockletown, reported that a volunteer scout of four had returned to camp that morning, bringing in Captain Jenkins and Lieutenant Shurtleff of the United States naval brigade. This scout met a party of six, near New Market bridge, killed Major Rawlings, wounded the two officers brought in, and put the rest to flight. Soon afterward Colonel Johnston reported that he would occupy Bethel, endeavor to secure the negroes from the lower part of the peninsula, and then occupy Harrod's and Young's mills, whence he could best operate with safety against marauding parties. July 24th, on account of the pa
issing. General Evans claimed the capture of 710 prisoners, 1,500 stand of arms, 3 cannon and 1 flag. Evans called on Longstreet for reinforcements when he reported his battle of the 21st, thinking that 20,000 Federals were in his front. Colonel Jenkins, with the Eighteenth South Carolina and cavalry and artillery, was dispatched from Centreville, in the afternoon of the 22d, and marched toward Leesburg, through mud and a driving rain, until midnight, when the infantry went into bivouac; bu of Leesburg about daylight of the 23d. That morning, finding his men much exhausted, General Evans ordered three of his regiments to fall back to Carter's mill, a strong position on Goose creek, about 7 miles southwest from Leesburg, and join Jenkins, who had been halted at that place, leaving Barksdale with his regiment, two pieces of artillery and some cavalry, as a rear guard near Leesburg, and Hunton, with his Eighth Virginia and two pieces of artillery, on the south bank of Sycolin cree
drive the Federal force under Milroy, at Winchester, from the Valley; ordering Jenkins, at the same time, to move his cavalry brigade down the Valley, in the same diared in front of Winchester and a portion of his advance at Martinsburg, while Jenkins broke the line of the Baltimore & Ohio railroad, thus preventing reinforcementy wagons, and a large quantity of military stores. On this same 15th of June, Jenkins moved on Chambersburg with his cavalry, and Ewell's advance crossed the Potoma army was stretched from Culpeper in Virginia to Chambersburg in Pennsylvania, Jenkins' cavalry holding the latter place. Ewell's advanced division was encamped, inng that his left was securely guarded by Jones and Imboden, and his advance by Jenkins, Lee, looking after the safety of his right, wrote to Stuart, on the 22d: Do y prisoner, and Kemper, Pettigrew, Hood, Trimble, Heth, Scales, G. T. Anderson, Jenkins and Hampton were severely wounded. In his official report, Lee writes of th
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