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concealed the combatants from each other. Forming Kershaw's division in line of battle, across the plank road, Longstreet, in person, led it against Hancock's retreating men, but failing to note, in the heat of pursuit, that his flanking brigades, under Mahone, had halted in line and were facing the roadway down which he was rushing. Mahone's men, mistaking Longstreet and his following for a Federal officer and his staff and escort, turned on them a full volleyed flank fire, which killed Jenkins and severely wounded Longstreet, thus checking an onset which promised to turn the Federal retreat into a disastrous rout.1 As Longstreet was carried to the rear, Lee rode rapidly to the front to reform his now disordered attack, and at 4 he again pressed forward his lines, through the smoking forest, to fall upon Hancock in the Brock road. Hill had already repulsed Burnside's feeble attack on Lee's center, and the time was opportune for renewing the attack on Grant's flanks. As Lee mo
Waller Tazewell, major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Swindler, Aylett A., major; Williams, Lewis R., Jr., lieutenant-colonel. Eighth Cavalry battalion (transferred to Tenth Cavalry): Davis, J. Lucius, lieutenant-colonel; Duffield, C. B., major. Eighth Cavalry regiment: Bowen, Thomas P., major, lieutenant-colonel; Cook, Alphonso P., lieutenant-colonel; Corns, James M., colonel; Edmondson, P. M., major; Fitzhugh, Henry, major, lieutenant-colonel; Jenifer, Walter H., lieutenant-colonel; Jenkins, Albert G., lieutenant-colonel. Eighth battalion Reserves: Miller, major. Eighth Infantry regiment: Berkeley, Edmund, major, lieutenant-colonel; Berkeley, Norborne, major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Berkeley, William N., major; Hunton, Eppa, colonel; Tebbs, Charles B., lieutenant-colonel; Thrift, James, major. Ninth Cavalry regiment: Beale, Richard L. T., major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Johnson, John E., colonel; Lee, William H. F., lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Lewis, Meriwet
gstreet's corps he reached the scene of battle at Manassas, August 29, 1862, and in the subsequent fighting served in command of a division consisting of his own, Jenkins', Pickett's and N. G. Evans' brigades. At South mountain he commanded his brigade, and in conjunction with Garnett, the two commands not exceeding 800 men, met Hd assigned to a division of Longstreet's corps, composed of his old brigade under Garnett, and the brigades of Armistead, Kemper and Corse, all Virginians, and Micah Jenkins' South Carolina brigade. Though there were five or six other Virginia brigades, in other divisions, this was distinctively the Virginia division of the army, put under his military charge in December of that year. When Sherman's army reached Savannah, he exercised command to the north of that city, with the forces of Jenkins, Harrison and Chestnut, at Coosawhatchie and Pocotaligo, guarding the route of escape for Hardee. In the latter part of December he was given command of a divis
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
ectively from 1 to 10, inclusive, and commanded by Cols. Johnson Hagood, J. B. Kershaw, J. H. Williams, J. B. E. Sloan, M. Jenkins, J. H. Rion, T. G. Bacon, E. B. Cash, J. D. Blanding, and A. M. Manigault. The brigadier-generals appointed by the he Fourth, Col. J. B. E. Sloan; the Eighth, Col. E. B. Cash; the Legion infantry, Col. Wade Hampton, and the Fifth, Col. Micah Jenkins. The latter regiment was not engaged in the great battle, but, under orders, crossed Bull run and attacked the strong force in front of McLean's ford. The regiment was wholly unsupported and was forced to withdraw, Colonel Jenkins rightly deeming an assault, under the circumstances, needless. The following enumeration of losses is taken from the several repin the War Records, Vol. II, p. 570: Kershaw's regiment, 5 killed, 43 wounded; Sloan's regiment, 11 killed, 79 wounded; Jenkins' regiment, 3 killed, 23 wounded; Cash's regiment, 5 killed, 23 wounded; Hampton's legion, 19 killed, 102 wounded; total,
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
fective operations. General Hill ordered Colonel Jenkins, with the Palmetto sharpshooters and the r Mattison and Colonel Giles, on the right of Jenkins and on the immediate left of Hill's attackings troops were beaten. Reaching the railroad, Jenkins halted and dressed his line, the Twenty-sevenleft in the general attack, sent the Fifth to Jenkins, under Lieut.-Col. A. Jackson, the gallant Co, Colonel Bratton being wounded) on the left, Jenkins boldly advanced to meet his foe. The two commlarge. Speaking generally of his losses, Colonel Jenkins says: In my two color companies, out of 8ll that they gained. Gregg, on the left, and Jenkins, in the center, bore their full share of the o report from either R. H. Anderson, Gregg or Jenkins. Longstreet specially mentions Anderson, JenJenkins and Captain Kilpatrick of the Palmetto sharpshooters in his report, for distinguished conduct.the heaviest loss falling on the Fourteenth. Jenkins lost over 450, 234 of these from the Sharpsho[20 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
teries; Anderson's old brigade, under Brig.-Gen. Micah Jenkins, with Corse's and Hunton's Virginia b Kemper, with two brigades in his front line, Jenkins and Hunter, supported by Corse; then D. R. Jotion of Warrenton. The brigades of Evans and Jenkins were composed of South Carolina troops; the Fon, and many other gallant spirits. Brigadier-General Jenkins was wounded at the head of his briga regretted that there are no reports from General Jenkins of record, or any one of his regimental corting Hood, came into battle connection with Jenkins. This was particularly the case when the gunin his report gives the line of program which Jenkins observed, as passing beyond the Chinn house a of the theater of battle for the brigades of Jenkins and Evans and the Hampton legion infantry, unelfth, 145; Thirteenth, 144; Fourteenth, 65. Jenkins' brigade— First (Hagood's), 124; Second Rifletenant Youngblood of the Fourteenth, and Lieutenant Jenkins of the Rifles, were wounded. We call [1 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
in Maryland, were the brigades of N. G. Evans, Kershaw and Jenkins under Col. Joseph Walker; the Fifteenth regiment, Colonel h Longstreet were the South Carolina brigades of Evans and Jenkins, the Fifteenth South Carolina with Drayton, and the Hamptoades under Generals Kemper and Garnett and Colonel Walker (Jenkins') returned from their march down the mountain and reached Col. Joseph Walker, Palmetto sharpshooters, commanding Jenkins' brigade, reported his force only partially engaged. Much, the Second rifles marching as rear guard. The losses in Jenkins' brigade were comparatively light, 3 killed and 29 woundedn our front having retired, and Colonel Walker, commanding Jenkins' South Carolina brigade, on our right, having sent to me f troops threw their masses against D. R. Jones' division. Jenkins' brigade under Colonel Walker was on the left of Jones' diharpshooters, were wounded. To that part of the action of Jenkins' brigade in which it was turned by Walker to deliver its f
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
and McLaws. In this disposition of the troops the South Carolina commands were posted as follows: Gregg's brigade on the right, as has been noted; McIntosh's battery, with Lieut.-Col. R. L. Walker's guns, on the extreme right of A. P. Hill; Jenkins' brigade with Pickett's division; Bachman's and Garden's batteries on Hood's line; Rhett's battery in Alexander's battalion; Kershaw's brigade in McLaws' line, with the left of the brigade resting on Hazel run. The brigade of Gen. N. G. Evans, The name and death of Gen. Thomas R. R. Cobb will forever be associated with this heroic defense, and the honor and glory of sustaining the position which he held against such odds, will be the lasting possession of Kershaw and his brigade. Jenkins' brigade, though under artillery fire and suffering the loss of 8 men, was but slightly engaged; Bachman's and Garden's batteries did effective service against the flank of the Federal attack on the extreme right. The rifle battery of Captain R
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
First corps were the batteries of Capt. Hugh R. Garden (Palmetto) and Captain Bachman's German artillery, with Hood's division, and the Brooks (Rhett's) battery, Lieut. S. C. Gilbert, in Alexander's battalion of Walton's reserve artillery. Gen. Micah Jenkins' South Carolina brigade, of Pickett's division, Longstreet's corps, was detached for special duty on the Blackwater, in southeast Virginia, under Maj.-Gen. D. H. Hill. In the Third army corps (A. P. Hill's), South Carolina was representeds decided. While it was in progress General Stuart, on the rear of General Lee's left, was fighting a great cavalry battle with the main body of General Meade's cavalry. Stuart had the brigades of Hampton, Fitz Lee, Chambliss, W. H. F. Lee and Jenkins. In the battle much of the fighting was at close quarters and with pistol and saber as the charging lines came together. In one of these contacts General Hampton was twice severely wounded. On the day previous, his having been the first of Ge
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
ttles of the 19th and 20th of September were now imminent. We give the organization of the two armies as they were engaged in that memorable conflict, omitting those troops which were not in the battle; as, for instance, the brigades of Hood's and Mc-Laws' divisions, and the artillery of those commands. Longstreet had only three brigades in battle on the 19th and five on the 20th, the artillery and other commands of his corps not having arrived. Among his absent brigades was that of Gen. Micah Jenkins, composed of South Carolina regiments. Bragg's army. Right wing, Lieutenant-General Polk commanding. Hill's corps, Lieut.-Gen. D. H. Hill: Cheatham's division, 5 brigades, 5 batteries; Cleburne's division, 3 brigades. 3 batteries; Breckinridge's division, 3 brigades, 4 batteries Walker's corps, Maj.-Gen. W. H. T. Walker: Walker's division, 3 brigades, 2 batteries; Liddell's division, 2 brigades, 2 batteries. Total of wing, 5 divisions, 16 brigades, 16 batteries. L
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