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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
icah Jenkins, and Col. John Bratton commanded Jenkins' brigade, which joined Longstreet after Chicknooga. On Longstreet's part Law's brigade of Jenkins' division was moved down the river below Lookforce in line of battle, when he notified General Jenkins, and was ordered to go as far as possible General Geary's division was attacked by Jenkins' South Carolina brigade. No other troops fir with the divisions of McLaws and Hood (under Jenkins), including the South Carolina brigades of JeCapt. B. M. Whitener the Third battalion. General Jenkins was in command of his brigade, in the divand directed an attack to be made by Brigadier-General Jenkins and myself upon the position of the the right of the road toward Fredericksburg. Jenkins' brigade was put in motion in the plank road,n in the woods to the right. I rode with General Jenkins at the head of his command, arranging wit On the same day General Bratton's brigade (Jenkins') was in battle on the Brock road, on the rig[9 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
. He commanded his regiment with gallantry in Jenkins' brigade, Longstreet's corps, at Williamsburg where he was in command of the brigade while Jenkins had charge of Hood's division. After the death of Jenkins at the battle of the Wilderness, he was at once promoted brigadier-general on the urgrigadier-General Micah Jenkins Brigadier-General Micah Jenkins was born on Edisto island in 1839ared that he hoped to hold every man in it if Jenkins could be promoted brigadiergen-eral. Besidesnt to the assistance of Bragg at Chattanooga, Jenkins' brigade was transferred to Hood's division, Field was now in charge of the division, and Jenkins led his famous old brigade to battle on May 6 Va., he had command of a brigade composed of Jenkins' Fifth South Carolina and Burt's Eighteenth a Kemper's and Garnett's Virginia brigades and Jenkins' South Carolina brigade, had a conspicuous pahis works. He was riding with Longstreet and Jenkins when these two generals were wounded, and for[4 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
eaching Virginia he was made quartermaster of Jenkins' brigade with the rank of major. Having a mi fort, but could not hold it without help, as Jenkins' regiment was utterly cut to pieces. The queHe was in Longstreet's corps at Suffolk, with Jenkins' brigade on the Blackwater, and in front of R to Virginia. During the Georgia campaign of Jenkins' brigade, he was dangerously wounded while aswn as the Palmetto sharpshooters, of which Micah Jenkins was colonel, and Captain Foster commander earer for his regiment, which was Moore's, of Jenkins' brigade, Longstreet's corps, Field's divisiogovernment. In the recent war with Spain, Micah Jenkins, the surviving son, volunteered in the Uni legion infantry, Col. M. W. Gary commanding, Jenkins' brigade, Longstreet's corps, army of Norther regiment was assigned to the brigade of Gen. Micah Jenkins, and after the latter was wounded, Colonsubsequently transferred to the staff of Gen. Micah Jenkins, with whom he served in Longstreet's cor[25 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
position. In this gallant movement, which began the discomfiture of Keyes' division, the Georgians were assisted by Micah Jenkins' South Carolina regiment. In the first charge the gallant Capt. Thomas J. Bacon fell mortally wounded. This officeZachry. Colonel Zachry's report states that after passing the first camp of the enemy he was ordered to follow up Colonel Jenkins' regiment and support him if necessary. Adjutant Gardner, on finding Jenkins, was hailed by the latter with, Come oJenkins, was hailed by the latter with, Come on, Georgia, I want you. As the two gallant regiments advanced, a change of position in the face of an advancing body of the enemy caused temporary confusion, which was rectified by Adjutant Gardner, who dashed boldly to where the line should be, and drove .the enemy from the woods. Their advance ceased at 8 p. m., a mile ahead of any other Confederate troops except Jenkins' regiment, their comrades in the charge. Sergeant Latham, of Company D, color-bearer, and the color guard were distingu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), How General A. P. Hill met his fate. (search)
quarters at the Turnbull House, on the Cox road. From there, accompanied only by two soldiers (Sergeant Tucker and Private Jenkins), he started to the right of his lines, his troops had been swept away from their line of defense, and that there wa's. We had gone a little more than half this distance, when we suddenly came upon two of the enemy's armed infantry men. Jenkins and myself, who up to this time rode immediately behind the General, were instantly upon them, when, at the command surrender, they laid down their arms. Turning to the General, I asked what should be done with the prisoners. He said, Jenkins, take them to General Lee. Jenkins started back with his men, and we rode on. Though not invited, I was at the General'sJenkins started back with his men, and we rode on. Though not invited, I was at the General's side, and my attention now having been aroused, and looking carefully ahead and around, I saw a lot of people in and about the old log hut winter quarters of General Mahone's division, situated to the right of Whitworth house and on the top of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
dix G, pp. 121-4. Charles Seton Fleming, the son of Colonel Lewis Fleming, a planter of Florida, of gentle Irish descent, was born near Jacksonville, February 9, 1839; educated in local private school, and in youth found employment in a mercantile house in Chicago, Ill. He evinced at an early age a preference for the profession of arms, and early in the year 1858, entered as a cadet King's Mountain Military School at Yorkville, South Carolina, the principal of which institution was Major Micah Jenkins, who afterward served with distinction as a General in the C. S. Army, and fell a martyr to the Lost cause on the bloody field of the Wilderness on the 5th of May, 1864. Young Fleming attended this school until June, 1859. After serving for a time as the purser on a river steamer, he entered, in July, 1860, upon the study of law, in the office of his brother, Louis J. Fleming, in Jacksonville, Florida. In consonance with his instincts he was also a member of a local military comp
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