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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
ing and undiminishing devotion to science of Dr. Jones have been so abundantly attested, that it isy Senior Surgeon D. Rutherford, Sept. 30, ‘63, Jones's Squadron Cavalry, Oct. 31, ‘63. Calvert, ‘63, 49th Tennessee Regiment. Transferred. Jones, Hilton S., Surgeon, appointed by Secretary of0, 1837. His parents, Tignal and Susan (King) Jones, were born in North Carolina, and descended frof Lavernia, and Lee Roy Beach, of Houston. Dr. Jones was married in 1867 to Miss Mary Kennon Crisden of the Church of the Messiah, Gonzales. Jones, Alfred, Assistant Surgeon. Passed Board Dec.lanta, Ga. Contract cancelled Jan. 31, ‘63. Jones, W. B., Assistant Surgeon. Dec. 31, ‘62, 41st eral Roddy, Nov. 3, ‘63, Ferrell's Battery. Jones, Geo. F., Surgeon. Dec. 31, ‘62, Tullahoma HoKentucky Cavalry, March 31, ‘63, no change. Jones, James T., Surgeon. Contract made by General s A. S. 16th Tennessee Regiment, Feb. 14, ‘63, Jones' com'd. Passed Board at Charleston, Feb. ‘62.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
a teacher, and on entering the war, by R. R. Wilson, 157-162. Johnson, Gen. Bradley T., 347. Johnston, Gen. J. E. His campaigns in Georgia, i. Jones, Jr., Ll. D., Col. Chas. C., soldier, scholar, historian, and lawyer, 165. Jones, D. D., Rev. John William. Prayer by, 282. Jones, M. D., Ll. D., Joseph. Surgeon-Generon, 75 Maury, Col. Richard L., 24th Virginia Infantry, C. S. A., 106. Mavourneen, Kathleen, 377. Medical Officers of the Army of Tennessee, C. S. A., by Joseph Jones, M. D., Ll.D., Surgeon-General U. C V., 165. Middletown, Battle of, 308. Mills, Col., Roger Quarles, 67. Missionary Ridge, Reminiscences of the gallant h of, 296. Torpedoes in the C. S. Navy, 75. Tredegar Iron Works, 90. United Confederate Veterans; organization of the Medical Corps of; report of Surgeon-General Jos. Jones, M. D., Ll.D., 14. Valley Campaign of 1864, The, 292. Veteran Camps at the Unveiling of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, 347 Virginia Cava
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Joseph Jones, M. D., Ll.D. (search)
Joseph Jones, M. D., Ll.D. Died, at his home in New Orleans, La., February 17, 1896, after many months of physical suffering, ProfesProfessor Joseph Jones, M. D., Ll. D. Thus has passed to the vale beyond, a man of the noblest instincts, a lover of truth, a servant of his kind eternal reward. It was the privilege of the writer to meet Dr. Joseph Jones during our late memorable internecine war. I have not been facitizens, patriots, scholars, and useful public ministrants. Dr. Joseph Jones was the first Secretary of the Southern Historical Society upouable work was presented. Since then, for purposes of reference, Dr. Jones recalled his Ms. It is to be hoped that his representatives will hnson, Major L J., death of, 172. Johnson, Zack, killed, 106. Jones, has. Edgeworth, 335. Jones, Dr., Joseph, tribute to, 382. JoJones, Dr., Joseph, tribute to, 382. Jones, D. D., Rev. J. Wm., 342. Journal, Farmville, Va., cited, 94. Kernstown, battle of, 130. Kirkland's N. C. Brigade in 1864-1864, 165
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
witnessed the departure of the company to war June 3, 1861. The company was organized at Edmond's Store, Va., by Mr. Joseph Jones, who was elected captain. Dr. Thomas Wynn was elected first-lieutenant, and John Maddox second-lieutenant. The coms of ladies being present. A lovely flag was presented the company by the ladies of Brunswick, which was accepted by Captain Jones in a neat speech. Captain Jones was soon promoted for gallant service in the Lost Cause to lieutenant-colonel, and DCaptain Jones was soon promoted for gallant service in the Lost Cause to lieutenant-colonel, and Dr. Wynn was promoted to the captaincy of the company. He served a short time and resigned, and John Maddox was elected captain. At the battle of Nottoway river, between Petersburg and Weldon, Colonel Jones was mortally wounded, and Captain Maddox Colonel Jones was mortally wounded, and Captain Maddox also received his death wounds in the same engagement. W. F. Elmore was elected captain to succeed the lamented Maddox, and served as captain during the remainder of the war, and laid down his arms at Appomattox Courthouse. The company entered the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A confederation of Southern Memorial Associations. (search)
, President; Phoebe Frazer, Secretary. The Ladies' Confederate Memorial Association, Fort Mills, S. C.; Mrs. J. B. Mack, President; Mrs. Elizabeth White, Secretary. The Ladies' Memorial Association, Knoxville, Tenn.; Mrs. Wm. Caswell, President; Mrs. M. E. Lloyd, Secretary. The Ladies' Memorial Association, Gainesville, Ala.; Mrs. D. H. Williams, President; M. B. Jackson, Secretary. The Ladies' Confederate Memorial Association, New Orleans, La.; Mrs. W. G. Behan, President; Mrs. Joseph Jones, Corresponding Secretary. The Southern Memorial Association, Fayetteville, Ark.; Mrs. Lizzie Pollard, President; Miss Julia A. Garside, Recording Secretary; Miss Sue H. Walker, Corresponding Secretary. At 4 o'clock the meeting was again called to order. It was decided to have a gray ribbon badge, with embossed gold letters, as their insignia until the next annual meeting, when a badge will be decided on. A motion was made by Miss Sue Walker that each association of this conf
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
ried (April 27, 1886) Howard R. Bayne, Issue: I. Samuel Preston Moore Bayne, died October 7, 1887; II. Mary Ashby Moore Bayne; III. Lloyd Moore Bayne. references.—The reports of the surgeon-generals of the United Confederate Veterans—viz: Joseph Jones, M. D., of New Orleans, La., and C. H. Tebault, M. D., of New Orleans, La.; the Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. II, page 125; Vol. XVII, page 12; Vol. XX, page 109; the Medical and Surgical Journal of the Con- federate States; the un, but much rain having fallen the previous night the ground became very soft and its whole superstructure fell in at the onset of the fight, so that the engagement was far advanced before any help could be rendered us. It is also true that Lieutenant Jones had a 9-inch Dalgren gun in position, but the sudden turn in the river at this point placed him out of view of the enemy, and he could not help us. With all due respect to the well-earned reputation of the Virginia crew and the remainder of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Dr. Samuel P. Moore. (search)
ward R. Bayne, a prominent counsellor at law, in New York city. The children are as follows: Preston Brown Moore (deceased) married Maria Pendleton Steger, of Richmond, Va. Issue: I. Mary Preston Moore, married Galloupe Morton (deceased); issue: Charles I. Morton. Issue II: Dr. Charles Lloyd Moore, unmarried. Lizzie Strong Moore, married (April 27, 1886) Howard R. Bayne, Issue: I. Samuel Preston Moore Bayne, died October 7, 1887; II. Mary Ashby Moore Bayne; III. Lloyd Moore Bayne. references.—The reports of the surgeon-generals of the United Confederate Veterans—viz: Joseph Jones, M. D., of New Orleans, La., and C. H. Tebault, M. D., of New Orleans, La.; the Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. II, page 125; Vol. XVII, page 12; Vol. XX, page 109; the Medical and Surgical Journal of the Con- federate States; the Rise and fall of the Confederate States Government, Vol. I, page 310; the Richmond Dispatch, June 1, 1889; the Surgeon-General's office, Washington, D
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
e to remain in command of Fort Drewry. It cannot be shown that the crew of the Virginia fired a shot from this fort on that occasion. It is true that the gallant Jackson, of the Patrick Henry, had casemated near the entrance to the fort an 8-inch gun, but much rain having fallen the previous night the ground became very soft and its whole superstructure fell in at the onset of the fight, so that the engagement was far advanced before any help could be rendered us. It is also true that Lieutenant Jones had a 9-inch Dalgren gun in position, but the sudden turn in the river at this point placed him out of view of the enemy, and he could not help us. With all due respect to the well-earned reputation of the Virginia crew and the remainder of our navy who had landed on our shore above the fort after the retreat before the Federal fleet from Norfolk, I have never understood that they had been able to render us any particular help on that occasion. The men who bore the brunt of that fight
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Some of the drug conditions during the war between the States, 1861-5. (search)
epared and published by order of Surgeon General S. P. Moore in 1863, and the following in the serial volumes of the Southern Historical Society Papers: Where the South got its Chemicals and Medicines, by Prof. J. W. Mallet, XXI; Report of Gen. Josiah Gorgas, Ordnance Department, XXIX; Progress of Medicine in the South, by Dr. Hunter Mc-Guire, XVII; Memoir of Gen. S. P. Moore, by Dr. Samuel E. Lewis, XXVIII; Medical History of the C. S. Army and Navy, and Roster of Medical Officers, by Dr. Joseph Jones, XX and XXII; Southern Genius, How War Developed It, by Gen. M. C. Butler, XVI; How the Confederates Changed Naval Warfare, by Gen. D. H. Maury; Iron Clads and Torpedoes, XXII, and further as to torpedoes IV, V, VI, IX, X, XXII, XXXI; Resources of the Confederacy in 1865, Report of Gen. Isaac M. St. John, II, III, and Contributions of the South to the Greatness of the American Nation, by Gen. C. A. Evans, XXIII.]—editor. Here, in grand old Maryland, this border State of the by-gone C
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of the companies. (search)
ohn Asbell, John Benton, died at Monticello, Ky., March 25, 1863, of brain fever; Van Buren Benton, died in Camp Douglas, March 14, 1864, of smallpox; T. C. Broaddus, George Butler, Peter Beck, Jacob Creath Bronston, W. B. Benton, James Cosby, James W. Coulter, Chas. Covington, James G. Cochran, H. W. Coldiron, Joseph Collins, Joel Embry, Wm. Grubb, David Giltner, John Hutchinson, Elisha Hall, Wiley Horn, Anderson Harris, Thos. Hamilton, died in Camp Douglas, September 27, 1863, of fever; Joseph Jones, Meredith Jones, M. B. Judy, Jacob Kurtz, Arch. Kavenaugh, J. B. Mize, Owen McKee, Travis Million, Samuel Meeks, James P. Norman, died in Camp Douglas, October 26, 1864, of pneumonia; J. R. Oldham, Preston Oldham, Richard Oldham, James Oldham, Q. R. Oldham, J. P. Oldham, Thomas Portwood, Benjamin Price, Silas Pearce, Robert Rowan, J. K. Sams, John Semonis, Andrew Turpin, Samuel Turpin, died in Camp Douglas, November 26, 1864, of smallpox; Harris Thorp, Granville Troxwell, Durrett White,
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