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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 3 1 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 3 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. 2 0 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 30, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 24, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 2 0 Browse Search
William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War 2 0 Browse Search
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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: the conquering pen. (search)
ut he has put another in my hand, ( the sword of the Spirit; ) and I pray God to make me a faithful soldier wherever he may send me--not less on the scaffold than when surrounded by my warmest sympathizers. My dear old friend, I do assure you I have not forgotten our last meeting, nor our retrospective look over the route by which God had then led us; and I bless his name that he has again enabled me to hear your words of cheering and comfort at a time when I, at least, am on the brink of Jordan. See Bunyan's Pilgrim. God in infinite mercy grant us soon another meeting on the opposite shore. I have often passed under the rod of Him whom I call my Father; and certainly no son ever needed it oftener; and yet I have enjoyed much of life, as I was enabled to discover the secret of this somewhat early. It has been in making the prosperity and the happiness of others my own; so that really I have had a great deal of prosperity. I am very prosperous still, and looking forward to a tim
e lines — the Union boys and rebels having meanwhile changed positions considerably. Sold again. A scouting party of the Eleventh Ohio, under command of Captain Jordan, made a descent on a happy company of the chivalry in a manner which was both adroit and amusing. The captain seeing a bright light in a house marched his paving done this, he brought up his men, who were concealed within a few rods. Without noise, in a few minutes their bayonets were closed around the house, and Captain Jordan, with revolver in hand, sprang into the centre of the rebels, ordering them to surrender instantly. A rifle or two were raised at him, but he, with great co and raised their hands in token of surrender. Pretty well done, captain, said the officer in charge of the picket post, as this turned out to be. Yes, said Jordan, we always do things pretty well. Fall in her-, and keep pretty quiet if you know what is good for you. When the rebels, after surrendering their arms, were m
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 6: hospital work. (search)
lay, I thought, Jesus, the King of kings, dwells here, and I had rather be this poor soldier than to be the tenant of a palace. I bade him good-bye, and promised to call soon and see him again, but death came sooner than I expected, for when I heard from him again he had fallen asleep in Jesus; earth bore another grave, but heaven had won a sweeter strain of praise to Him who doeth all things well. Oh, blessed Jesus! Oh, thou divine Redeemer! when we see our friends treading the verge of Jordan, free from fear because Thou art with them, we would raise our hearts and our voices in adoration, and praise, and thankfulness to Thee, Who captive leads captivity And takes the sting from death. Tyree Glenn. Rev. C. F. Fry writes, from Staunton, Virginia: While I was preaching at the hospital a young man, confined to his bed, wept most bitterly. After the service was over he said to me, I have been thinking a great deal about my condition, but never, until now, could get the c
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 12: progress of the work in 1864-65. (search)
ternoon led down into the liquid grave twelve young men who had given me the most satisfactory evidence of repentance toward God and faith in the Lord Jesus Christ. The large congregation which lined the banks of the Rapidan was greatly moved, and I trust that the ordinance was blessed to the good of souls. The stream was very rapid (owing to the recent rains) and the whole scene vividly reminded me of those occasions upon which the great forerunner baptized soldiers in the rapid stream of Jordan. I was told by an old citizen, that about fifty years ago Mrs. General Madison (sister-in-law to the President) was bap tized in the same place in the presence of a large crowd, of which the President was one. What would have been the feelings of the great expounder of the Constitution if he could have looked into the future and seen that at the same place, in fifty years, the ordinance of baptism would be administered to Southern soldiers in sight of the hostile lines of their Northern br
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 13: results of the work and proofs of its genuineness (search)
white pillow, on which the familiar name of a distinguished lady of Georgia was marked—she having contributed it from her own bed for the benefit of the suffering soldiers. Near him sat the matron of the hospital, rendering every possible comfort that the sympathy of a woman could suggest, intensely sharpened by the recent loss of a promising son, who fell in a late battle. Reduced by a secondary hemorrhage and amputation, Albert, with a calm, steady faith, came down to the cold waters of Jordan, where he lingered for a short time and dictated a letter to his mother, which I wrote for him, in which he gave an appropriate word to each one of the family, not even forgetting Maum Patty, his old nurse, and reserving a postscript, the last and best, for Jennie. I would like very much to give my readers a copy of this letter, but it is the exclusive treasure of the bereaved and afflicted ones, whose grief is too sacred for the intermeddling of any save the most intimate friends. After
white pillow, on which the familiar name of a distinguished lady of Georgia was marked-she having contributed it from her own bed for the benefit of the suffering soldiers. Near him sat the matron of the hospital, rendering every possible comfort that the sympathy of a woman could suggest, intensely sharpened by the recent loss of a promising son, who fell in a late battle. Reduced by a secondary hemorrhage and amputation, Albert, with a calm, steady faith, came down to the cold waters of Jordan, where he lingered for a short time and dictated a letter to his mother, which I wrote for him, in which he gave an appropriate word to each one of the family, not even forgetting Maum Patty, his old nurse, and reserving a postscript, the last and best, for Jennie. I would like very much to give my readers a copy of this letter, but it is the exclusive treasure of the bereaved and afflicted ones, whose grief is too sacred for the intermeddling of any save the most intimate friends. Afte
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 9: a literary club and its organ. (search)
ercise a just and catholic criticism, and to recognize every sincere production of genius; in philosophy it will attempt the reconciliation of the universal instincts of humanity with the largest conclusions of reason; and in religion it will reverently seek to discover the presence of God in nature, in history, and in the soul of man. The Dial, as its title indicates, will endeavor to occupy a position on which the light may fall; which is open to the rising sun; and from which it may correctly report the progress of the hour and the day. The Dial will be published once in three months, on the first day of January, April, July, and October. Each number will contain 136 octavo pages, making one volume in a year of 544 pages, which will be furnished to subscribers at Three Dollars per annum, payable on the delivery of the second number. The first number will be published on the first day of July next. Weeks, Jordan & Co., 121 Washington Street, Boston, Ma., May 4, 1840.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 10: the Dial. (search)
nt, you can have as many numbers as you want for yourself or your friends of this first number, but our contract with them was that twelve numbers should be given to Mr. R. each quarter for the use of contributors. Of these I receive two. Mr. Thoreau will have it, of course, as we hope his frequent aid. But I did not expect to furnish it to all who may give a piece occasionally. I have not sent it to E. H. [Ellen Hooper] or C. S. [Caroline Sturgis] or N. I sent a list to W. and J. [Weeks & Jordan] of those to whom I wished this number sent. I did not give Mr. Stone's name, but doubtless Mr. R. did. I will see about it, however. I presume Mr. Cranch is a sub. scriber, as is J. F. Clarke and others who will write; but I will look at the list when in town next Wednesday. I desired Mr. Thoreau's Persius to be sent him, as I was going away to Cohasset at the time it came out, and I understood from Mr. R. that it was sent, and he did not correct it. I do not know how this was; the e
tricate itself from a besetting peril-provoked public inquiry, and demanded an investigation. The Richmond Enquirer had the following commentary on the Roanoke Island affair. It contains a picture of Confederate improvidence, which was to be repeated at many stages of the war, and to put our scantiness and shiftlessness in frightful contrast with the active zeal and munificent preparations of the enemy: On the island no preparations whatever had been made. Col. Shaw's regiment, Col. Jordan's, and three companies of Col. Marten's regiment, had been on the island for months. These regiments numbered, all present, one thousand nine hundred and fourteen. Of these, about one thousand seven hundred were soldiers. There were four hundred and fifty absent and sick, leaving one thousand two hundred and fifty for all duty. From these, five batteries had to be manned, leaving, on the morning of the eighth, only eight hundred and three North Carolina infantry reported for duty. Th
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. (search)
To Mrs. S. B. Shaw. Wayland, 1857. It is a dark, drizzling day, and I am going to make sunshine for myself by sitting down before the old fire-place and having a cosy chat with you. Did you see Mr. H--'s sermon, preached soon after his return from Palestine? He thinks the truth of the Bible is proved by the fact that Jordan is still flowing and the Mount of Olives still standing. He says his faith was greatly strengthened by a sight of them By the same token he ought to consider Grecian mythology proved, because Olympus and Parnassus are still standing; and a sight of them ought to strengthen his faith in Jupiter and the Muses. What a fuss they have made about finding the name of Jonah among the inscriptions at Nineveh! Does that prove that the whale swallowed him, and that he did not set easy on the whale's stomach? I can never get over wondering at the external tendency of a large class of minds.
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