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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The case of Fitz John Porter. (search)
arrest. As finally constituted the court consisted of Major-Generals David Hunter and E. A. Hitchcock, and Brigadier-Generals Rufus King, B. M. Prentiss, James B. Ricketts, Silas Casey, James A. Garfield, N. B. Buford, and J. P. Slough, with Colofind yourselves heavily pressed by superior numbers of the enemy, you will not push matters further. Fitz John Porter and King's division of McDowell's corps are moving on Gainesville from Manassas Junction, and will come in on your left. They haveon at a pace that will bring them here by tomorrow night or the next day. General McDowell almost immediately withdrew King's division, marched it round in the rear by the Sudley Springs road, did not connect or again communicate with Porter during the day, and only brought King's division into action, on the right, at 6:15 P. M. Porter's right was not in connection or communication with Reynolds, who held the left of the main line. Between them was a very wide gap, hidden by a wood thro
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Fredericksburg, Va. (search)
Smyth; 4th N. Y., Col. John D. MacGregor (w), Lieut.-Col. William Jameson, Maj. Charles W. Kruger; 10th N. Y., Col. John E. Bendix (w), Capt. Salmon Winchester (m w), Capt. George F. Hopper; 132d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Charles Albright. Brigade loss: k, 32; w, 271; m, 39 == 342. Artillery: G, 1st N. Y., Capt. John D. Frank; G, 1st R. I., Capt. Charles D. Owen. Artillery loss: k, 1; w, 6 == 7. artillery Reserve, Capt. Charles H. Morgan: I, 1st U. S., Lieut. Edmund Kirby; A, 4th U. S., Lieut. Rufus King, Jr. Artillery Reserve loss: w, 7. Ninth Army Corps, Brig.-Gen. Orlando B. Willcox. Escort: B, 6th N. Y. Cav., Capt. Hillman A. Hall; C, 6th N. Y. Cav., Capt. William L. Heermance. First division, Brig.-Gen. William W. Burns. First Brigade, Col. Orlando M. Poe: 2d Mich., Lieut.-Col. Louis Dillman; 17th Mich., Col. William H. Withington; 20th Mich., Col. Adolphus W. Williams; 79th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. David Morrison. Brigade loss: k, 1; w, 12 == 13. Second Brigade, Col. Benjamin C. Ch
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at the beginning of Grant's campaign against Richmond. (search)
itzhugh: 9th Mass., Capt. John Bigelow; 15th N. Y., Capt. Patrick Hart; C, 1st N. Y., Lieut. William H. Phillips; 11th N. Y., Capt. John E. Burton; H, 1st Ohio, Lieut. William A. Ewing; E, 5th U. S., Lieut. John R. Brinckle. horse artillery. First Brigade, Detached with Cavalry Corps. Capt. James M. Robertson: 6th N. Y., Capt. Joseph W. Martin; B and L, 2d U. S., Lieut. Edward Heaton; D, 2d U. S., Lieut. Edward B. Williston; M, 2d U. S., Lieut. A. C. M. Pennington; A, 4th U. S., Lieut. Rufus King, Jr.; C and E, 4th U. S., Lieut. Charles L. Fitzhugh. Second Brigade, Capt. Dunbar R. Ransom: E and G, 1st U. S., Lieut. Frank S. French; H and I, Capt. Alanson M. Randol; K, 1st U. S., Lieut. John Egan; A, 2d U. S., Lieut. Robert Clarke; G, 2d U. S., Lieut. William N. Dennison; C, F and K, 3d U. S., Lieut. James R. Kelly. Army of the James, Maj.-Gen. Benj. F. Butler. Tenth Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. Quincy A. Gillmore. first division, Brig.-Gen. Alfred H. Terry. First Brigade, Col. Josh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cold Harbor. June 1st, 1864. (search)
l. Otto Harhaus; 5th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. John Hammond; 2d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. George A. Purington; 18th Pa., Maj. John W. Phillips. Second Brigade, Col. George H. Chapman: 3d Ind., Maj. William Patton; 8th N. Y., Maj. Edmund M. Pope; 1st Vt., Maj. William Wells. first Brigade, horse artillery, Capt. James M. Robertson: 6th N. Y., Capt. Joseph W. Martin; B and L, 2d U. S., Lieut. Edward Heaton; D, 2d U. S., Lieut. Edward B. Williston; M, 2d U. S., Lieut. Carle A. Woodruff; A, 4th U. S., Lieut. Rufus King, Jr.; C and E, 4th U. S., Lieut. Charles L. Fitzhugh. artillery, See also batteries with divisions and corps. Brig.-Gen. Henry J. Hunt. Second Brigade, Horse Artillery, Capt. Dunbar R. Ransom: E and G, 1st U. S., Lieut. Frank S. French; H and I, 1st U. S., Capt. Alanson M. Randol; K, 1st U. S., Lieut. John Egan; A, 2d U. S., Lieut. Robert Clarke; G, 2d U. S., Lieut. W. Neil Dennison; C, F, and K, 3d U. S., Lieut. George F. Barstow. Artillery Park, Lieut.-Col. Freeman McGilvery: 1
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 12: operations on the coasts of the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
t Macon very much in the condition in which Burnside observed it when he entered it, excepting the absence of fragments of shot and shell and cannon and carriages, made by the National missiles. On its wall, landward (seen in shadow in the engraving), that bore the brunt of the bombardment, were the broad wounds made by shot and shell; and here and there the remains of furrows made by them were seen on the parades, the ramparts, and the glacis. After passing half an hour pleasantly with Captain King, the commandant, and other officers of the garrison, and making the sketch on the preceding page, we departed for the Ben Deford in the tug that took us from it and on the following day left the harbor for the waters in front of Fort Fisher. While Parke and Lockwood were operating at Beaufort Harbor, troops under General Reno were quietly taking possession of important places on the waters of Albemarle Sound, and threatening Norfolk in the rear. The movement was partly for the purpose
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
you say you have all the railroads but that. I am puzzled to see how, lacking that, you can have any excepting the scrap from Richmond to West Point. The scrap of the Virginia Central, from Richmond to Hanover Junction, without more, is simply nothing. That the whole of the enemy is concentrating on Richmond, I think cannot be certainly known to you. Saxton at Harper's Ferry informs us that large forces, supposed to be Jackson's and Ewell's, forced his advance from Charlestown to-day. General King telegraphs us from Fredericksburg, that contrabands give certain information that 15,000 left Hanover Junction Monday morning, to re-enforce Jackson. I am painfully impressed with the importance of the struggle before you, and shall aid you all I Can, consistently with my view of due regard to all points. --Lincoln's dispatch to McClellan, May 28, 1862. Having reason for believing that General Anderson, who was specially charged with confronting McDowell, was still at Ashland, McClel
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 17: Pope's campaign in Virginia. (search)
, between Warrenton and Sperryville; and General Rufus King, of the same corps, who was at Fredericknorthward. For this purpose he directed General Rufus King, at Fredericksburg, to send forward detary in his stead. Detachments sent out by General King from Fredericksburg made bold dashes toward under General Reno, and other troops under General King; and ten regiments under General Stevens, ts; McDowell, with the divisions of Ricketts and King, was at Warrenton; and Heintzelman, Heintzel of Bull's Run the year before. July 21, 1861. King's division of McDowell's corps was in close purtion with Longstreet. He directed McDowell and King to maintain their positions at all hazards; tol Jackson and Longstreet momentarily increased. King had been compelled to abandon the Warrenton pikd heavily, while Porter, with his own corps and King's division, was to move upon the road to Gainesn's left had been driven back nearly a mile. King's division of McDowell's corps had come into ac[1 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 18: Lee's invasion of Maryland, and his retreat toward Richmond. (search)
more brigades, making the Confederate force defending the two crests and the Gap, nearly thirty thousand strong. Meanwhile, during a partial lull of two hours in the contest, the divisions of Wilcox, Rodman, and Sturgis arrived and took position. Then at about two o'clock Hooker's corps came up, and at once moved to the right along the old Hagerstown road, to crush the Confederate left at the higher crest. An hour later a general battle-line was formed with Ricketts' division on the right, King's, commanded by General Hatch, in the center, and resting on the turnpike, and Reno's on the left. The Confederates had much the advantage of position, for the hillsides up which the Nationals toiled were steep and rocky, yet they nowhere, faltered, and at four o'clock fighting was general along the whole line. The ground was contested at many points inch by inch. Hatch was wounded when Doubleday took his Battle-Feld on South Mountain. this little picture shows the appearance of that
Human Slavery. A majority of the framers of the Constitution, like nearly all their compatriots of our Revolutionary era, were adverse to Slavery. In the debate of Wednesday, August 8, on the adoption of the report of the Committee, Mr. Rufus King [then of Massachusetts, afterward an eminent Senator from New York] wished to know what influence the vote just passed was meant to have on the succeeding part of the report concerning the admission of slaves into the rule of representation. ht be prohibited. As the section now stands, all articles imported are to be taxed. Slaves alone are exempt. This is, in fact, a bounty on that article. Mr. Dickinson [of Delaware] expressed his sentiments as of a similar character. And Messrs. King and Langdon [of New Hampshire] were also in favor of giving the power to the General Government. General Pinckney thought himself bound to declare candidly, that he did not think South Carolina would stop her importations of slaves in any s
o the cedars again and inflicted heavy loss oh the retreating foe, but they also suffered greatly. Here Major Carpenter of the Nineteenth infantry, Captains Bell and Wise of the Fifteenth, and Captain Kneass of the Eighteenth, were killed, and Major King of the Fifteenth and Major Slemmer of the Sixteenth wounded. The rebels continued their flight until they were beyond our fire on the right; our troops were recalled into the field and placed along the crest of the hill on the right and aroundt military minds of the age; his manner of maintaining the position placed him forever by the side of Ney, Bozzaris, and Leonidas. Lieut.-Col. Berry, of the Louisville Legion, acquitted himself nobly, as all who know him always knew he would. Major King, of the Fifteenth infantry, won the admiration of all who saw the grand and perilous movement, by his manner of handling his battalion in the terrible fight in the cedars. He fell severely wounded. It is to be hoped that the Government will.
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