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at Tolopotomoy Creek. It had become evident that Lee's position was now so strong, all attempts to force h, who happened to be on his way from Richmond to join Lee. Him and his force our cavalry had dislodged by skilfd established his lines, correspondingly forcing back Lee's left. By reason of the advance of the Second Corps across the river, Lee drew back his right to cover Hanover Junction, still clinging with his centre to the riv repulsed. The situation was now a critical one, for Lee's position was not only invulnerable, but by rapid co that was so universal. Nothing, we now believe, but Lee's inferior force could have prevented him from executing for another move, for Grant, having decided that Lee could not be forced from this position, concluded to he night there. At this time the exact position of Lee's army was not definitely known, and Sunday we advancn, pitted against that of the enemy commanded by Fitz-Hugh Lee and Wade Hampton, with the result in our favor.
rshaw, Gen. J. B., 92. Killoran, H-ugh, 302, 304, 305, 349. Kilpatrick, Gen., 113. Knowland, J. H., 81, 83, 87, 208, 209, 302, 351. L. Landing, Harrison's, 275. Landing, Pratt's, 242. Landing, Wilcox's, 275. Lane, Gen., 320. Lee, Gen. Robert E., 70, 94, 98, 99, 104, 100, 110, 127, 130, 141, 144, 153, 162, 175, 180, 189, 212, 216, 223, 227, 234, 237, 242, 271, 279, 284, 297, 415, 418, 419, 420, 424, 425. Lee, Gen., Fitz-Hugh, 225, 251. Lee, James, 351, 407, 426. Lear,Lee, Gen., Fitz-Hugh, 225, 251. Lee, James, 351, 407, 426. Lear, Joseph, 401. Lemmon, Wm. B., 39, 198, 201, 272, 404. Libby Prison, 430. Lohan, Francis, 80, 85, 149, 199, 200, 206, 207. Longstreet, Gen., 121, 130, 246. Lucas, James A., 402, 403, 404, 405, 408. Lyman, Col., 271. Lynnfield, 18, 20. M. Mahone, Gen., 301, 325. Martin, Capt., 196, 197. Martin, Richard, 80, 203, 326, 339, 397, 403. Martin, Wm. H., 82, 83, 86. Mason, Chas. A., 206, 314, 324, 339, 352, 375, 398. Manassas, 110, 113, 139, 140. Maryland Heights, 87, 91, 92, 93, 9
ief or to his enemy. But it was impossible for Lee to save his army by this road; and all that waeality enclosed by the lines of the conqueror. Lee therefore undoubtedly intended to yield when hepassed the enemy's pickets and was conducted to Lee. The great rebel was sitting by the roadsides supposed the generalsin-chief would have met. Lee informed Babcock of this arrangement, and requeis anxiety lest the fighting should recommence, Lee now volunteered to send an officer through his eridan's staff, escorted by a rebel officer. Lee then rode on to the village of Appomattox, and thern Virginia in his grasp, and indignant that Lee should have continued to fight after he had proing with a verandah in front. Grant was met by Lee at the threshold. There was a narrow hall and ant's own staff. No rebel entered the room but Lee and Colonel Marshall, who acted as his secretaral Lee, that you accept these terms? Yes, said Lee; and if you will put them into writing, I will [12 more...]
eality enclosed by the lines of the conqueror. Lee therefore undoubtedly intended to yield when heis a noble, manly way of confessing defeat, and Lee's method of submitting to the inevitable was nerted for Sheridan's front at an early hour, and Lee's communication was sent by the way of Meade's s supposed the generalsin-chief would have met. Lee informed Babcock of this arrangement, and requeing with a verandah in front. Grant was met by Lee at the threshold. There was a narrow hall and ant's own staff. No rebel entered the room but Lee and Colonel Marshall, who acted as his secretarhat he had, and so it was that at this juncture Lee and his aide-de-camp were better dressed than the men who had pursued them. Lee was tall, large in form, fine in person, handsome in feature, gil exchanged, or released by proper authority. Lee said that he had expected some such terms as thal Lee, that you accept these terms? Yes, said Lee; and if you will put them into writing, I will [12 more...]
The Virginia first regiment. --Gen. Lee has refused to disband the First Regiment of Virginia volunteers, noted for its excellent service in the late battles, and it is to be filled with picked men. An advertisement appears in relation to this corps in the Dispatch to-day.
Skirmish at Malvern Hill. About 11 o'clock on Thursday morning, our cavalry pickets at Malvern Hill were attacked by a superior force of the enemy, and a brisk skirmish of half an hour ensued. The enemy approach by the Charles City road, and commenced the attack in the immediate vicinity of the late battle-field. Our force engaged consisted of about one hundred and fifty men, of the 2d and 4th regiments of Virginia cavalry, and were commanded by Col. Lee, of the 4th regiment. In the engagement, Private Carter, of the Governor's Guard, was killed, and Captain Chamberlain, of the same company, wounded in the foot. In addition, there were some five or six others wounded, among these we have heard the names of Madison Clinch and R. B. McRae, of the Prince William cavalry. Mr. Clinch is now at the United States Hotel hospital in this city, and has a severe flesh wound in the leg above the knee. The enemy were driven back, and our forces continued to occupy the field at the l
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