hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 405 results in 29 document sections:

1 2 3
able to give the principal occurrences of their campaign. General G. W. C. Lee moved his division from Chapin's Bluff across the James Rivebeen withdrawn from Howlett's Bluff; both of these were added to G. W. C. Lee's division. The supply train, not being able to cross the Appome enemy's cavalry on the morning of the 5th, with the baggage of G. W. C. Lee's division and about twenty thousand good rations. At Amelia y advanced. They were repulsed, and that portion which attacked G. W. C. Lee's artillery brigade was charged by it, and driven back across Sa closing his report he says: The discipline preserved by General G. W. C. Lee in camp and on the march, and the manner in which he handled had been unwilling or reluctant to promote my aide-de-camp, Colonel G. W. C. Lee, it is proper to state that the only obstacle to be overcomees were General Kershaw's division of Confederate troops and General G. W. C. Lee's division, composed mostly of artillerymen armed as infantr
The President's Military family. Colonel Joseph R. Davis, Mississippi, A. D. C., with rank of Colonel of Cavalry; in 1863 entered the field as Brigadier-General. Colonel G. W. Custis Lee, Virginia, A. D. C., with rank of Colonel of Cavalry; subsequently entered the field and rose to the grade of Major-General. Colonel Joseph C. Ives, A. D. C., with rank of Colonel of Cavalry. Colonel Wm. Preston Johnston, Kentucky, A. D. C., with rank of Colonel of Cavalry. Colonel Wm. M. Browne, Georgia, A. D. C., with rank of Colonel of Cavalry; subsequently entered the field and rose to the grade of Brigadier-General. Colonel John Taylor Wood, Louisiana, A. D. C., with rank of Colonel of Cavalry. Colonel James Chestnut, Jr., South Carolina, A. D. C., with rank of Colonel of Cavalry; subsequently entered the field and rose to the grade of Brigadier-General. Colonel Francis R. Lubbock, Texas, A. D. C., with rank of Colonel of Cavalry; also a Confederate Governor of Texas.
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Brigadier-Generals of the Confederate States Army, alphabetically arranged. (search)
composed of the 20th and 23d Alabama regiments and Colonel Vaughn's Tennessee regiment. 255Lee, Edwin G.VirginiaGen. J. E. JohnstonSept. 23, 1864.Sept. 23, 1864.  In command at Staunton, Virginia; subsequently detailed on secret service of the Confederacy. 256Lee, FitzhughVirginiaGen. R. E. LeeJuly 25, 1862.July 24, 1862.Sept. 30, 1862. Promoted Major-General September 3, 1853; brigade composed of the 1st, 3d, 4th, 5th and 9th Virginia cavalry regiments, Army of Northern Virginia. 257Lee, G. W. C.VirginiaGen. R. E. LeeJune 25, 1863.June 25, 1863.  Commanding brigade of local troops for the defence of Richmond; previously was an aid-de-camp to President Davis, with the rank of Colonel; promoted Major-General early in 1865. 258Lee, Robert E.Virginia     Promoted General August 31, 1861, to take rank from June 14, 1861. 259Lee, Stephen D.S. CarolinaMaj. Gen. M. L. SmithNov. 6, 1862.Nov. 6, 1862.April 22, 1863. Promoted Major-General August 3, 1863; brigade composed of the 17th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General R. E. Lee's war-horses. (search)
veral years after the death of General Lee, Traveller, who was turned out for exercise and grazing during the day, accidentally got a nail in one of his fore-feet; this occasioned lockjaw, from which he died despite of every effort for his relief. He was buried in the grounds of Washington and Lee Uuiversity. Some years after the death of Traveller, Lucy Long, who was also turned out during the day for exercise, in some way injured one of her hind legs. After the leg healed, General G. W. Custis Lee put her in the keeping of the late Mr. John Riplogle, of Rockbridge a (lover of horses), paying for her board. Mr. Riplogle dying, Mr. John R. Mackay, subsequently took charge of her. She was hearty until the winter of 1890-‘91, when she began to fail. She died in the spring of 1891, at the age of thirty four years, and was buried on the farm of Mr. Mackay. Some three years after the close of the war, Ajax, who was turned out during the day, when not used, ran against the iron pr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.46 (search)
distingushed lawyer and citizen of this city, but now residing at Athens. The battle of Sailor's Creek was one of the several battles which took place after General Lee evacuated Petersburg, and just before the surrender of the army at Appomattox. The Confederate army, says the Savannah News, of the 5th, decimated and starvingfficer and man being either killed, wounded, or captured. The Guards went to Virginia when every available armed man that could be spared was needed to reinforce Lee's army. Although in service from the beginning of the war, the operations of the battalion had been confined to the coast, in the neighborhood of Savannah and Chare stationed with it at Chaffin's Bluff, on the James river, into a small brigade, commanded by Colonel Crutchfield, which was attached to the division of General G. W. Custis Lee, son of General Robert E. Lee. On this account General Custis Lee has been an honorary member of the corps since its reorganization after the war. Th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crutchfield's artillery Brigade. (search)
Crutchfield's artillery Brigade. Report of its Operations, April 3-6, 1865, when it was captured with Lee's Division at Sailor's Creek. This, printed from the original manuscript, was recently supplied by General G. W. Custis Lee, late President Washington and Lee University: Savannah, March 3, 1866. Major-General G. WGeneral G. W. Custis Lee, late President Washington and Lee University: Savannah, March 3, 1866. Major-General G. W. C. Lee, Commanding Lee's Division, Well's Corps, Army, Northern Virginia. General: In compliance with your request that I would communicate in an official form such information as I may possess of the operations of Crutchfield's Brigade, from the evacuation of the lines on the north of the James river to the capture of theMajor-General G. W. C. Lee, Commanding Lee's Division, Well's Corps, Army, Northern Virginia. General: In compliance with your request that I would communicate in an official form such information as I may possess of the operations of Crutchfield's Brigade, from the evacuation of the lines on the north of the James river to the capture of the Division at Sailors' Creek, on the 6th April, 1865, I have the honor to report as follows: The Brigade consisted of the 10th, 18th, 19th and 20th Virginia Battalions of artillery, the Chaffin's Bluff garrison composed of five unattached Virginia companies of artillery, temporarily organized as a battalion, and the 18th Georgia
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
Retreat from Richmond. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, May 2, 1897.] Colonel Crutchfield and the artillery Brigade. see ante, pp. 38-47. the report to General G. W. Custis Lee, of Major W. S. Basinger, on the operations of Crutchfield's artillery Brigade. interesting reminiscences. A forced March 'Mid Cold and rain. Fight at Sailor's Creek. Richmond, Va., April 27, 1897. To the Editor of the Dispatch. Being on a visit to Richmond from my home in St. Louis, I noticed ve made any omissions I would be glad to have them supplied. The adjutant-general of the brigade was Captain W. N. Worthington, of Richmond. Captain Worthington had been a schoolmate of mine at Hanover Academy just before the war. Major-General G. W. Custis Lee commanded the division and Lieutenant General Ewell the corps. We were thoroughly drilled in artillery practice, and manned the heavy guns on the line of the Richmond defences. We were also well drilled in infantry tactics, and we
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
ee, my recollections. These reports make special mention of the conspicuous part borne by the Artillery Brigade at Sailor's creek. I quote as follows: Major-General G. W. C. Lee, commanding the divisions, composed of Barton's and of Crutchfield's Artillery Brigade, says: Before my troops got into position across the creekillery Brigade. He was killed after gallantly leading a successful charge against the enemy. Lieutenant-General Ewell, commanding the corps (Kershaw's and G. W. C. Lee's divisions), says that the Artillery Brigade of Lee's Division displayed a coolness and gallantry that earned the praise of the veterans who fought alongside of it, and even of the enemy. Our dashing cavalry leader, General Fitzhugh Lee, says: Though portions of the force, particularly the command of General G. W. C. Lee, fought with gallantry never surpassed, their defeat and surrender were inevitable. I will now quote from the report of the Federal commander, Major-General H. G
ee was a commodore in the old United States navy, and is now chief of the Bureau of Orders and Detail, Navy Department, in Richmond. He commanded at Drewry's Bluff for a long time. Robert Edmund Lee is at Petersburg — the General Lee of this day. He married Miss Custis, of Arlington, in Alexandria county, the daughter and heiress of George Washington Parke Custis, the adopted son of General Washington, who married Mrs. Custis, his mother. General Lee has three sons--Brigadier-General G. W. Custis Lee, aid-decamp to the President (he passed No. 1 at West Point); Major-General W. H. F. Lee, commanding a division of cavalry in the Army of Northern Virginia, and Robert Edmund Lee, who entered the army, at the instance of his father, as a private in the Rockbridge artillery. He is now on the staff of General Fitzhugh Lee. Besides these children, General Lee had four daughters — Mary, Anne, Agnes and Mildred — all of them unmarried, and one of whom (Anne) has died died during t<
1 2 3