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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiseences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
y, some 4,000 prisoners and immense quantities of stores of all kinds,. and had done all this with a loss of less than 1,000 men killed, wounded and missing. The battle of Seven Pines, as the Confederates called it, or Fair Oaks, as it is named by the Federals, had been fought and claimed as a victory by both sides; and the Army of Northern Virginia had been deprived of its able commander, General J. E. Johnston, who was severely wounded. But fortunately for the Confederate cause General R. E. Lee was called to the command. Some time before, when Colonel A. R. Boteler had applied to him from Jackson for an increase of his force to 40,000 men, with which he would invade the North, General Lee had replied: But he must help me to drive these people away from Richmond first, and the plan of the great campaign was thus foreshadowed. Jackson's secrecy. We were confident that we were to sweep down the Valley again, and the sending of some eight thousand troops from Richmond to r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last days of the Confederate Treasury and what became of its specie. (search)
e Executive office, on the special train containing the President, his staff, his Cabinet (excepting the Secretary of War, General John C. Breckinridge,) and many other government officials, being at the time the chief and confidential clerk of the Executive office. The party reached Danville, Va., next day (General Breckinridge arriving a few days afterwards) where the government officers were partially reorganized and opened, remaining there until the 10th of April, when the news of General R. E. Lee's surrender was received. The next move was to Greensboro, N. C., the headquarters of General G. T. Beauregard's little army. A stay of some days was made there, during which General J. E. Johnston reported for a conference as to the general situation. When the President's party prepared to leave, as the railroads were cut at several points south of us by the Federal cavalry under General Stoneman, who were still raiding to the southwest of our line of travel, by orders of Colonels
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
ing task to announce to you the success achieved by this army to-day. The enemy was this morning driven from his strong position behind Beaver Dam Creek, and pursued to that behind Powhite Creek, and finally, after a severe contest of five hours, entirely repulsed from the field. Night put an end to the contest. I grieve to state that our loss in officers and men is great. We sleep on the field, and shall renew the contest in the morning. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, R. E. Lee, General. The reception of the news of our great victory at Cold Harbor and Gaines's Mill by the people of Richmond may be better imagined than described. All day long the sound of the conflict echoed through the city, and old men, women and children crowded on the tops of the houses or on the neighboring hills where they could distinguish the smoke of the battle and hear even the rattle of the musketry. Soon the stream of wounded began to pour in, and tidings of a great victory to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The work of the Southern Historical Society in Europe. (search)
ollowing: General Early's Relative strength of the Confederate and Federal armies. McCarthy's Detailed Minutiae of soldier life. Stuart's Report of Cavalry operations in 1863. Stuart's Report of the First Maryland campaign. General R. E. Lee's Report of the Chancellorsville campaign. Field Letters from Lee's Headquarters. General Fitz. Lee's Address on Chancellorsville. Colonel. William Allan's Address on Jackson's Valley campaign, (with maps.) Lee and Gordon at Appeneral J. E. B. Stuart. Two specimen cases of desertion. General J. E. B. Stuart's Report of the Gettysburg campaign (with map.) I have also translated many interesting parts of your Life of Lee. I have also published biographies of R. E. Lee, Jackson, Stuart and Mosby, besides my larger History of the War. I do not mention these things to glorify my poor efforts to bring my friends out of their modest shade into the clear sunlight of truth, but I do wish to prove to my old galla
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Winchester and Fisher's Hill — letter from General Early to General Lee. (search)
Winchester and Fisher's Hill — letter from General Early to General Lee. Headquarters V. D., October 9th, 1864, (New Market.) General R. E. Lee: General,--In advance of a detailed report, I have determined to give you an informal account of the recent disasters to my command, which I have not had leisure to do before. On the 17th of September I moved two divisions — Rodes's and Gordon's — from Stevenson's Depot, where they, together with Breckenridge's division, were encamped (Ramseur being at Winchester, to cover the road from Berryville) to Bunker Hill, and on the 18th I moved Gordon's division, with a part of Lomax's cavalry, to Martinsburg, to thwart efforts that were reported to be making to repair the Baltimore & Ohio railroad. This expedition was successful, and the bridge over Back Creek was burned by a brigade of cavalry sent there. On the evening of the 18th Rodes was moved back to Stevenson's Depot and Gordon to Bunker Hill, with orders to start at daylight t<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A reminiscence of an official interview with General R. E. Lee. (search)
A reminiscence of an official interview with General R. E. Lee. By J. Wm. Jones. In a lot of old war newspapers sent the other day to the office of the Society, I found an order which recalled one of the most pleasant interviews I ever had with our grand old chief--General Lee--and which I have long searched for in vain, as I desired to preserve it. At one of the meetings of our Chaplains' Association, held at Orange Courthouse, Rev. B. T. Lacy and myself were appointed a committee to n on divine service at the customary hour in the morning. They will also give their attention to the maintenance of order and quiet around the place of worship, and prohibit anything that may tend to disturb or interrupt religious exercises. R. E. Lee, General. I have a very vivid recollection of the interest he manifested in what we told him of the great revival which was making well nigh every camp vocal with the praises of God, and of the emphatic expressions of delight to which he ga
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Correspondence and orders concerning the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
subject personally to the President, which, perhaps, would be more convenient to you and satisfactory to him. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General. Headquarters, Richmond, Va., May 22, 1862. General J. E. Johnston, Comdg. Army of Northern Virginia, Headquarters near Richmond, Va. General,--Yoo draw any additional force that may be wanted from the troops stationed in contiguous positions to the work. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General. Headquarters, Richmond, Va., May 22, 1862. General J. E. Johnston, Commanding, &c. General,--Your letter of this morning Not found. by Major W the military operations now exercised by General Mahone, who is, of course, subject to your orders. I am, General, most respectfully, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General. Headquarters, Harrison's, Va., May 28, 1862--9 A. M. General Lee. General,--If McDowell is approaching, of which there can be no doubt, we must f
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The PeninsulaMcClellan's campaign of 1862, by Alexander S. Webb. (search)
t of a battle was seen next day. No concerted, definite plan of operations guided the Confederates on June 1st. Severe but desultory fighting took place between Longstreet's lines and the fresh troops of Hooker's and Richardson's divisions without any decided result, while Smith, now in chief command of the Confederates remained quiet in front of Sumner, though Magruder's large division, which had been unengaged, was at hand. By midday all fighting had ceased. Early in the afternoon General R. E. Lee, was placed in command by President Davis, and during the evening and night he ordered the Confederate army back to its late positions in front of Richmond. The battle of Seven Pines, though costing each army about 6,000 men, resulted in little. The plan of the Confederate leader was admirable, but the execution of it was defective. Too much time was wasted in waiting for Huger; but a more serious fault was the delay in sending forward Smith's division on Longstreet's left. Next
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Correspondence and orders concerning the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
more accurate accounts of the position of the enemy from your scouts. I have the honor to be your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General. Headquarters Department of Northern Virginia, May 30, 1862--8.40 P. M. Major-General Huger: General,--Thrs, Richmond, Virginia, June 1, 1862. Special Orders, No. 22. I. In pursuance of the orders of the President, General R. E. Lee assumes command of the armies of Eastern Virginia and North Carolina. The unfortunate casualty that has deprived, Richmond, Virginia, June 2, 1862. Special Orders, No. 126. * * * * * * * * II. By direction of the President General Robert E. Lee, C. S. Army, will assume the immediate command of the armies in eastern Virginia and North Carolina. * * necessary. You must also make arrangements to collect such tools as may be with the army, and I have to request that you will push forward the work with the utmost diligence. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Captain Irving and the steamer Convoy --supplies for prisoners. (search)
e matter and to remove, so far as possible, causes of complaint, I suggest that the articles sent by either party should be confined to those necessary for the comfort and health of the prisoners, and that the officer selected from among them to receive and distribute the articles, should be given only such a parole while so engaged, as to afford him the necessary facilities to attend properly to the matter. I have the honor to be, Very respectfully your obedient servant, (Signed) R. E. Lee, General. From this date, after an interruption of nearly eight months, deliveries of food and clothing to prisoners on both sides were made, continuing until nearly the close of the war. I deem it proper to repeat that during the period of interruption, the Confederate proposal of January 24th, 1864, was before the Federal authorities, and its acceptance continuously urged. As the last agreement concerning supplies related only to such as were sent by the respective governments, in
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