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Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 14, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee to the rear. (search)
Lee to the rear. by John R. Thompson. Dawn of a pleasant morning in May Broke through the Wilderness, cool and gray, While perched in the tallest tree-tops, the birds Were carrolling Mendelsshon's “Songs without words,” Far from the haunts of m, Tipped with the light of the earliest beam, And the faces are sullen and grim to see, In the hostile armies of Grant and Lee. All of a sudden, ere rose the sun, Pealed on the silence the opening gun-- A little white puff of smoke there came, And ahe saddle, there sat A grey-bearded man, with a black slouch hat, Not much moved by the fire was he, Calm and resolute, Robert Lee. Quick and watchful, he kept his eye On two bold Rebel brigades close by-- Reserves, that were standing (and dying) at Go to the rear, and we'll send them to h--! Then the sound of the battle was lost in their yell. Turning his bridle, Robert Lee Rode to the rear. Like the waves of the sea, Bursting the dykes in their overflow, Madly his veterans dashed on the fo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. did General George H. Thomas have any purpose of fighting on the side of Virginia, his native State, at the commencement of the late war? (search)
n Horne, in his recently published Life of General George H. Thomas, who devotes some ten pages to an attempt to show that General Thomas never for a moment wavered in his allegiance to the old flag, and was at all times patriotic and loyal, while Lee yielded to the pressure against positive convictions, and drifted into the leadership of the forces in arms against the general government. We propose at some future time to fully consider this question, but meantime we give the following statewith the rank of Major) of Commandant of the Corps of State Cadets. On the request of his friends the Governor of Virginia decided to appoint him a Colonel of the Virginia forces and Chief of Ordnance of the State. And when, as yet, neither Lee nor Johnston had indicated any purpose to leave the Federal service, the attitude and intention of Thomas were as well known as those of any gentleman of the State, and he was spoken of by several of the secession members of the convention as the
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: poets of the Civil War II (search)
ho was the wife of one of the most distinguished colonels of Lee's army, the sister-in-law of Stonewall Jackson, and the friend of Lee. John R. Thompson, successor to Poe as the editor of The Southern literary Messenger, became assistant secretary tonever have written The conquered Banner and The sword of Robert Lee if he had not visualized as a chaplain the heroism and tnot a Knight asleep. One phase of the struggle ends with Lee's whole army crossing the Potomac into Maryland—an event celof Charleston was the beginning of the end. Various poems on Lee, notably Ticknor's Lee, Thompson's Lee to the Rear, and the Lee, Thompson's Lee to the Rear, and the anonymous Silent March, suggest the last battles in Virginia. The dominant note of the later poetry is that of melancholy, nLee to the Rear, and the anonymous Silent March, suggest the last battles in Virginia. The dominant note of the later poetry is that of melancholy, now and then tempered by a sort of pathetic longing for peace. Eggleston tells us that the most popular poem on both sides cederate flag, and, above all, Father Ryan's The sword of Robert Lee and The conquered Banner. Not until the end of the war
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: the New South: Lanier (search)
nging for his boyhood home. These writings show him to have been, in spite of his political opinions, of the old school of Southern gentlemen. More typical both in opinions and in fervour was Charles Colcock Jones, Jr. (1831-93). Born in Savannah, he graduated from Princeton in 1852 and the Harvard Law School in 1855. His Southern convictions, however, still intact, were intensified by his service in the artillery of the Confederate States. When the guns were stilled by the surrender of Lee, he, like Johnston, joined that numerous caravan which, seeing no hope in its own section, sought fortune in other regions. New York and the practice of law were his goals. Although he remained North twelve years, he moved no jot nor tittle from his early point of view. On his return south in 1877 to a suburb of Augusta, Georgia, he became at once conspicuous for his devotion to the Lost Cause, and when he died in 1893, his body, wrapped in the flag of the Confederacy, was given a soldier
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
4, 351, 352, 382, 401 Stranger in Lowell, the, 52 Strauss, 209 Stuart, Moses, 208, 209, 211 Such is the death the soldier dies, 331 Sumner, Charles, 51, 143, 144, 319 Sun (N. Y.), 186, 187, 357 n. Sunday, 5 Sunrise, 343 Supernaturalism of New England, the, 52 Susan Coolidge. See Woolsey, Sarah Sut Lovengood. See Harris, G. W. Surrender at Appomattox, the, 279, 285 Swamp Fox, the, 306 Swift, 5, 102, 203 Swinburne, 51, 245, 271, 271 n. Sword of Robert Lee, the, 291, 309 Symonds, J. A., 27, 263 n. Symphony, the, 337, 343, 345 System of doctrines contained in divine revelation explained and defended, 199 Tabb, John B., 291, 326-329, 330, 342, 343, 345 Tales for the Marines, 154 Tales of a Wayside inn, 39, 49 Tales of soldiers and Civilians, 387 Talisman, the, 174, 369 Talvi (Mrs. Robinson), 136 Tamerlane and other poems, 57 Tamerlane, 66, 68 Taney, Roger Brooke, 89 Tanglewood tales, 401 Tannenbaum, 0 Tannenbaum,
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
mayor of the city for three terms. In 1882 he was elected to represent Darlington county in the State legislature for two years. During this time he was admitted to the bar, and has practiced law at Florence since. In 1888 he became president of the bank of Florence and served as such for several years. He was married in December, 1865, to Miss Antoinette T. Chandler, of Winnsboro, S. C., and they have four sons: Harry A., lawyer and editor of the Daily Times and Messenger at Florence; Robert Lee, assistant cashier of the bank of Florence; Peter A., a farmer of Florence county, and Mason C., now in the junior class of the South Carolina college. In evidence of his interest in Confederate comradeship he has attached himself to the camp of Confederate Veterans and has been lieutenant-commander of Pee Dee camp, No. 390, U. C. V., at Florence. His only brother, Joseph W. Brunson, served efficiently and gallantly through the entire war in the same battery (Pee Dee) as gunner and orde
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
States was the rankest treason, were just as sincere and patriotic as those who placed the Union above all other things and regarded as treason the least resistance to its authority. Each side was perfectly loyal to its idea of what the American constitution was, and on many a bloody field they proved the sincerity of the motives that prompted them to espouse the cause for which they were even willing to die. Colonel Grayson was no impetuous youth led astray by a sudden impulse, but like Robert Lee, he followed that which seemed to him the path of duty. Though with regret he left the old army, he entered that of the Confederacy from the purest of motives and with a sincere heart. On account of his experience as a soldier he was appointed a brigadier-general in the provisional army of the Confederate States, his commission bearing date August 15, 1861. He was at once placed in command of the department of Middle and Eastern Florida. But he never had an opportunity to strike a blow
ter to the Cincinnati Commercial. would have been captured on the southern bank of the Tennessee. With the capture of his army, General Grant would have been in danger of suffering military eclipse. He would have found his name, assailed through the Northern press, linked to a great disaster rather than to a victory snatched by reinforcements from defeat. He would not have sat before Vicksburg or offered, as victor, an ultimatum; nor, indeed, would his have been the dogging of glorious Robert Lee in the Wilderness; nor to sit, the Union's host, in the White House at Washington. Misapprehension had done its utmost to defame greatness. It had, with its strongly-feeble hands, dragged Johnston from the exalted place gained by his great qualities, to make him pass as a marked man through the valley of humiliation. Praise is due to those uncorrupted instincts of men, however, which lead them with clarified vision nobly to weigh maligned reputation on juster weights than those for th
y, there in place of the one removed. . . . Recommend that Congress pass a law authorizing the President to appoint persons {say inspectors) to visit that department and investigate the management of the quartermaster and commissary departments, etc. Thus the non-military element saw the way clear to redeem the State from military mal-administration in all its branches. The obvious truth was, that with well-equipped armies of sufficient strength, Generals Price, Holmes, Kirby Smith or Robert Lee could win victories. Success attends upon the heavier battalions, and these they did not have. Circumstances over which he had no control prevented General Smith from making Little Rock the center, and Arkansas the granary, of the department. Those circumstances were the swarms of soldiers in blue uniforms, recruited from every land and every race, which swelled the ranks of the enemy, while sheer exhaustion of resources was rapidly diminishing the armies of the Confederacy. The region
nia, if we exert ourselves. I see no escape for Lee. I will put all my cavalry out on our left flannd the cavalry commander more than anxious lest Lee should effect his escape. The Sixth corps had sville and Farmville. I am strongly of opinion Lee will leave Amelia to-night to go south. He willes, the vanguard of each corps discovered that Lee had already withdrawn from Amelia. As Grant annd a half from the left of the Second corps. Lee thus confessed his inability to make his way toat Farmville the Appomattox must be recrossed. Lee was marching now by a road parallel with Grant,nd following blindly but resolutely the will of Lee. On the morning of April 6th, Sailor's creek this force had started, Ord received word that Lee had broken away from Amelia, and was apparently should encounter the entire cavalry command of Lee. He had already sent General Theodore Read, hisender. But the stubborn fight in his front led Lee to believe that a heavy force had struck the he[14 more...]
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