hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 1,620 results in 108 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Marse Robert is asleep. (search)
hat knightly figure, One hand upon his sword, The other pressed above his heart, A vow without a word! Two laurel leaves had flutter'd down, For flowers their vigils keep, And crown'd him, though, I think, they knew ‘Marse Robert was asleep!’ In glorious Old Westminster, No monument of war, No marble story, half so grand As this, our army saw! Our leafy Old Westminster— Virginia's woods—now keep Immortal that low whisper, ‘Marse Robert is asleep!’ As we clasp hands, Old Blue Coat, List, Brother of the North, Had Foreign foe assail'd your homes You then had known his worth! Unbroken vigil o'er those homes It had been his to keep: Step lightly o'er the border then, ‘Marse Robert is asleep!’ He's yours and mine, is Robert Lee, He's yours and mine, Hurrah! These tears you shed have seal'd the past, And closed the wounds of war! Thus clasping hands, Old Blue Coat, We'll swear by th' tears you weep, The sounds of war shall be muffled— ‘Marse Robert is asleep!’ Ric
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
the onset by way of Chancellorsville, and finds Lee with two divisions of Longstreet's corps absentk at bay at Fredericksburg, Jackson, who, under Lee's directions, has stealthily marched around himf the valorous men who made it. It failed. But Lee, unshaken, rallies the broken line, and the nexdeeds of the people. Mr. Davis, truly said General Lee, did nothing more than all the citizens of he ghastly wound which made life hopeless. General Lee bent tenderly over the wounded man and thenady to be foremost. Lee the Soldier, over-rode Lee the General, and when the pinch and struggle ca denounced the North, and the indictment of General Lee for treason, the General followed him to thnerous and genuine praise of noble men, and for Lee there was full measure. He lived to see deeplybeing a deficiency in the amount necessary, General Lee said: I will give that sum. A sense of weang will, dispensing millions to his favorites. Lee had opportunities as great as any conqueror and[71 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
self, The orator equals the occasion. Then General Early. His words were brief, but he commanded your humble servant to come forward and face a crowd already entranced with glorious eloquence. I obeyed, said a few words, recited the Sword of Robert Lee, and stole away. Stonewall Jackson's daughter, Julia, unveiled the statue. Crowds went in and came out, and the faces of most were sad. Clouds were gathering away over on the mountains. The sun went down, and Lexington will never see such a day again, because the world will never know another Robert Lee. At the close of Father Ryan's recitation, a procession was formed on the platform, which was headed by General Early and Major Daniel, Judge McLaughlin, and Mr. Edward V. Valentine, and Professor J. J. White, and Mr. J. Crawford Neilson, followed by other distinguished visitors, soldiers, professors, divines, students and citizens generally, which passed through the chapel into the mausoleum, where Miss Julia Jackson withdrew t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The friendship between Lee and Scott. (search)
t it on the highest principles of Christian civilization. He cheerfully granted the passport and said: Yes, go and see Robert Lee. Tell him for me that we must have no war, but that we must avert a conflict of arms until the sober second thought of the people can stop the mad schemes of the politicians. In the interview which these gentlemen had with General Lee he most cordially reciprocated the kindly feelings of General Scott, and expressed his ardent desire to avert war and his willingnnety days, and to the confident assertions of some of the Southern politicians that the war would be a very short one, General Lee said with a good deal of feeling: They do not know what they say. If it comes to a conflict of arms the war will lae wishes and aspirations of these two great soldiers could not have been realized. Men will differ as to whether Scott or Lee was right in the course which each thought proper to pursue on the only great question which ever divided them, but all mu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The sword of Lee. (search)
The sword of Lee. By Father A. J. Ryan. Forth from its scabbard, pure and bright, Flashed the sword of Lee! Far in the front of the deadly fight, High o'er the bLee! Far in the front of the deadly fight, High o'er the brave, in the cause of right, Its stainless sheen, like a beacon-light, Led us to victory. Out of its scabbard, where full long, It slumbered peacefully— Roused froming the strong, Guarding the right, and avenging the wrong— Gleaned the sword of Lee! Forth from its scabbard, high in air, Beneath Virginia's sky— And they who sawa brighter land, Nor brighter land had a cause as grand, Nor cause, a chief like Lee! Forth from it scabbard! how we prayed That sword might victor be! And when oua heart grew sore afraid, We still hoped on, while gleamed the blade Of Noble Robert Lee! Forth from its scabbard! all in vain! Forth flashed the sword of Lee! 'TisForth flashed the sword of Lee! 'Tis shrouded now in its sheath again, It sleeps the sleep of our noble slain, Defeated, yet without a stain, Proudly and peace
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee's farewell address to his Army. (search)
General Lee's farewell address to his Army. General orders no. 9. Headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, April 10, 1865. After four years of arduous service, marked by unsurpassed courage and fortitude, the Army of Northern Virginia has been compelled to yield to overwhelming numbers and resources. I need not tell the brave survivors of so many hard fought battles, who have remained steadfast to the last, that I have consented to the result from no distrust of them, but feeling that valor and devotion could accomplish nothing that would compensate for the loss that must have attended the continuance of the contest, I determined to avoid the useless sacrifice of those whose past services have endeared them to their countrymen. By the terms of agreement, officers and men can return to their homes and remain until exchanged. You will take with you the satisfaction that proceeds from the consciousness of duty faithfully performed, and I earnestly pray that a merciful G
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Robert E. Lee. (search)
! with your bright, emblazoned scroll, And tell the years to be, The first of names that flash your roll Is ours—great Robert Lee. Lee wore the gray! Since then 'Tis right's and honor's hue; He honored it—that man of men— And wrapped it round the Lee wore the gray! Since then 'Tis right's and honor's hue; He honored it—that man of men— And wrapped it round the true. Dead! but his spirit breathes; Dead! but his heart is ours; Dead! but his sunny, sad land wreathes His crown with tears for flowers. A statue for his tomb! Mould it of marble white— For wrong, a sceptre of death and doom— An angel of hope and right. But Lee has a thousand graves In a thousand hearts, I ween, And tear-drops fall from our eyes in waves That will keep his memory green. Ah! Muse, you dare not claim A nobler man than he; Nor nobler man hath less of blame, Nor blamelesear-drops fall from our eyes in waves That will keep his memory green. Ah! Muse, you dare not claim A nobler man than he; Nor nobler man hath less of blame, Nor blameless man hath purer name, Nor purer name hath grander fame, Nor fame—another
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
there has been a general call from all over the country. We have thought it well to make this a Lee number, and we are sure that it will be acceptable to our readers generally, who will desire to h he has promised to write out for our Papers. Major Henry T. Stanton read a very sweet poem on Lee, which we had hoped to publish in this issue, but it has been unfortunately crowded out, as is ale related incidents confirming the tender of the supreme command of the United States Army to General Lee—the high estimate which General Scott had of the best soldier he ever saw. and General Lee'sGeneral Lee's freedom from nepotism. These, together with an admirable paper read by Mr. Henry L. Stone, and a deeply interesting and very valuable sketch of the Ohio raid, read by Captain Leland Hathaway, will shall write up the Artillery and Colonel Charles Marshall shall finish his Military Biography of Lee, the world will begin to know something of what our grand old army, with its small numbers and sc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Correction of errors in statement of Governor Anderson, and letter of General Echols. (search)
s Lee was very well suited to the command, he may naturally have enforced his opinion by a reference to my own, but General Robert Lee knew too well what was due to me and to himself to have claimed any power to control me in the matter. He was as l likely to assume what did not belong to him as I was to surrender my constitutional function. I frequently consulted General Lee about officers to be employed elsewhere than under his command, and in connection with the subject of West Virginia I have received a copy of a letter written to me by General Lee from his headquarters at Orange Courthouse, 27th of January, 1864. He writes: I have not been unmindful of your request expressed in your letter of the 16th inst., desiring my opinion in At a later date, when General Ransom's health rendered it necessary to relieve him, I sent the following telegram to General Lee: Richmond, August 9, 1864. General R. E. Lee, Dunn's Hill, Va. Who shall relieve General Ransom in the Valley?
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual reunion of Pegram Battalion Association in the Hall of House of Delegates, Richmond, Va., May 21st, 1886. (search)
guns on those fateful three days—it seems but yesterday that we saw Lee and Gordon and A. P. Hill and Early grouped about this flag as it dat honorable and effective part, according to the official reports of Lee, Jackson, and A. P. Hill) in every general action delivered by the Ag as men shall read the military reports of Hill, of Jackson, and of Lee. In his case, as in others, well may we leave the praise that evee direction of Millwood, and early in December was ordered to rejoin Lee in the neighborhood of Fredericksburg. Here, in the action of the 1f what all men felt would be the greatest battle of the war, but General Lee, who had seen him immediately on his arrival, said to A. P. Hillse the youthful soldier, for if ever man weighed his words it was Robert Lee, and Pegram afterwards said to a comrade over the camp fire that k reckoned in every service higher than Brigadier of infantry. General Lee after the war wrote to one of Pegram's officers as follows: The
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11