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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
the nature, the wants, and the means of popular education are little understood here, in practice at least. Among some other places I went to afterwards was John Murray's, —the publishers,—where I fell in with Lockhart, with whom I have exchanged cards this week, but whom I had not seen. He is the same man he always was and alance, to which Lockhart's manners irresistibly impelled me, and which I dare say was as judicious with him as any other tone, though I am sure it quite astonished Murray, who looked . . . . as if he did not quite comprehend what I was saying. We dined at Mrs. Villiers', Mother of Lord Clarendon, of Edward Villiers, and of MrVan De Weyer, Soon afterwards Mr. Bates's son-in-law. the Belgian Minister, was there,—an acute and pleasant person, talking English almost perfectly well,—and Murray, formerly secretary to Lord Lyndhurst, and now the Secretary of the great Ecclesiastical Commission, —a very good scholar and a very thorough Tory, who talks w
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 12: (search)
ion, and will be lastingly valued for reference. Mr. Buckle also, in a private letter, says: In Mr. Ticknor's singularly valuable History of Spanish literature there is more real information than can be found in any of the Spanish histories which I have had occasion to read. The letter appears in the Life of Theodore Parker, to whom it was addressed. The first edition of the work appeared from the press of the Messrs. Harper, New York, in the latter part of the year 1849, while Mr. John Murray, at the same time, published a small edition in London. A Spanish translation was already begun, from advanced sheets, by Don P. de Gayangos and Don Enrique de Vedia, but the last volume of this did not appear until several years later. Meantime, reviews and notices appeared on both sides of the Atlantic, some of which contained inconsiderable objections to matters of style, or to special opinions, omissions, and statements; but all the articles which carried weight with them agreed
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
ursus on the old liturgies, or their fragments, most learned and irrelevant to everything else in the book. . . . . We wish you and yours a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Yours sincerely,—shorter next time,— Geo. Ticknor. To Sir C. Lyell. Boston, May 23, 1854. My dear Lyell,—There goes in the diplomatic bag of this steamer a portion of the printed sheets of a work on the History of the Formation and Adoption of the Constitution of the United States. It is addressed to Mr. Murray. The book—2 vols. 8vo, when Completed—is by my kinsman, Mr. George T. Curtis, and involves the civil history of the country, in all the relations which constitute the foundations of its present prosperity and character, from 1776 to 1789. It is written with ability, clearness, and power, and it is astonishing how much of what it sets forth from the forgotten journals of the old Congress, and from manuscript sources, is not only new to many persons better informed in the history of the
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
r, Count, I. 77, 78. Murchison, (Sir) Roderick, I. 419, 421, II. 155, 176, 179, 371 Mure, Colonel, William, II. 70, 77, 80. Murray, J. A., I. 277, 408. Murray, John, II 147, 255. Murray, John, senior, I. 58, 60, 62, 68, 294. Murray, Mr., II. 149. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, II. 422, 423, 438 and noteMurray, John, senior, I. 58, 60, 62, 68, 294. Murray, Mr., II. 149. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, II. 422, 423, 438 and note, 445. Musgrave, Bishop of Hereford, II. 178. Musgrave, Mr., I. 246, 247, 248. Musignano, Charles Bonaparte, Prince (afterwards Canino), II. 60, 66, 85, 127, 141. N Nahant, I. 339, 385. Namias, Dr., II 314. Napier, Lord, II. 417. Napier, McVey, II. 161, 162. Napier of Dublin, II. 378. Naples, Ferdinand Murray, Mr., II. 149. Museum of Comparative Zoology, Cambridge, II. 422, 423, 438 and note, 445. Musgrave, Bishop of Hereford, II. 178. Musgrave, Mr., I. 246, 247, 248. Musignano, Charles Bonaparte, Prince (afterwards Canino), II. 60, 66, 85, 127, 141. N Nahant, I. 339, 385. Namias, Dr., II 314. Napier, Lord, II. 417. Napier, McVey, II. 161, 162. Napier of Dublin, II. 378. Naples, Ferdinand II. King of, II. 6, 10, 11. Naples, visits, I. 174-176, II. 350, 351. Nasse, Dr., I. 454. Naumann, II. 12, 19. Naumann, Professor C. F., I. 454. Navarrete, M. F. de., I. 197. Neander, J. W. A., I. 493. Necker de Saussure, Madame, 1.155 and note. Necker, M. and Madame, II. 37. Nelson, Lord, anecdote of, I. 63.
. 8, 1826 Churches Green street, Advent, closed for religious services, Mar. 13, 1864 Hanover st., corner Bennet street, built of wood, 1741 Sold to Murray's Universalist Society, 1785 Enlarged and repaired, 1792 Again repaired for Father Streeter, 1824 Rebuilt of brick, dedicated, Jan. 1, 1839 Sold to thnge street, Feb. 27, 1879 Freeman's child, by Chas. T. Freeman, at Pocasset, May 21, 1879 Joseph F. Frye, by three Italians, in Joy street, Aug. 10, 1879 Murray, Rev. John Universalist preacher, arrived in Boston, first time, Oct. 26, 1773 Ordained for the Middle and Bennet street Church, Dec. 29, 1785 Museum, Co Union stone, the town vote to remove, Mar. 12, 1797 Victory, great celebration at Faneuil Hall, Apr. 5, 1865 Universalism preached in Boston, by John Murray, Oct. 30, 1773 V. Valuation of the town, £23,788, 1679 Of the City, $44,896,800, 1823 Of the City, 52,442,600, 1825 Of the City, 59,586,000,
97 Meagher, Gen'l 97 Meal-house, 97 Mechanics' Institute, 97 Merchants' Exchange, 97 Meteors, 97 Mexico, City of 97 MeGennisken, Bernard 97 MeClellan, Gen., Geo. B. 97 Milk Inspectors, 97 Military Companies, 97, 98 Mill Dam, 98 Mill Creek, 98 Mill Pond, 98 Mill, Water 98 Mill, Wind 98, 99 Miller, William 99 Mint House, 99 Model Artists, 99 Moody and Sankey, 99 Monuments, 99 Money, 99, 100 Morrill, Asa 100 Mummy, 100 Murder, 100 to 104 Murray, Rev. John 104 Museums, 104 Music Hall, 104 Muster, 104 N. Nantasket, 105 Navy Yard, 105 Neck Lands, 105 Negroes, 105 Negro Hill, 105 New Boston, 105 Newsboys, 105 Newspapers, 105, 106 Nickel Money, 106 Night Soil, 106 Night-Walkers, 106 Non-Importation, 106 North-Eastern Boundary, 106 Northern Lights, 106 Nooks Hill, 106 Northampton District, 106 Nursery, 106 O. Oath of Allegiance, 106 Odd Fellows, 107 Odd Fellows' H
Passengers arrived per Steamship "Yorktown," Parrish, Master, from New York: L. S. Elial, A. Turner, Miss E. Luders, C. S. W. Price, J. M. Lane, D. DeBair, T. Richardson, P. C. Royce, L. M. Ferris, Jr., H. D. Beach, P. Mahoney, John Murray, and 5 steerage.
Singular Accident. --A man named John Murray, living in Newark, N. J., on Saturday evening placed the muzzle of a loaded gun barrel, detached from the stock, to his mouth, and while blowing into it, the muzzle came in contact with a lighted candle, discharging the weapon. Murry's head was blown off, and portions of his skull and brains scattered about the room. The barrel rebounded, and striking his mother-in-law, ten feel distant, penetrated four inches into her chest. It is believed she cannot survive.
The accident in Newark. --The singular accident in Newark, N. J., on Saturday night, by which two persons lost their lives, has been noticed. One of the victims, John Murray, a young married man, while cleaning a gun from which he had taken the stock, put the muzzle in his mouth, and holding the barrel so that the nipple was near a burning candle, tried to see if he could agitate the flame by blowing through it, thus testing whether it contained a load. By the unsteadiness of his hands, it is supposed, the nipple came in contact with the flame and the barrel was discharged, blowing the poor fellow's head into a hundred fragments, and rebounding with tremendous force. struck his mother-in-law, who sat directly opposite him, and penetrated her right breast, just below the collar-bone, to the depth of six inches. The light was extinguished by the explosion, and the young wife, in hurrying across the room to her wounded mother, fell over the dead body of her husband, which was th
The Gretna Green blacksmith. --John Murray, the blacksmith of Gretna Green, is dead. During his long and useful life he conferred happiness on several hundred persecuted couples.
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