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Euripides, The Suppliants (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 14 0 Browse Search
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T. Maccius Plautus, Amphitryon, or Jupiter in Disguise (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 14 0 Browse Search
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Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus (ed. Sir Richard Jebb) 12 0 Browse Search
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Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese) 10 0 Browse Search
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Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 151 (search)
n indeed he became frantic, and went forward to the platform and stigmatized the Boeotarchs as traitors to Hellas, and declared that he would move a decree—he, who never looked on the face of an enemy in arms !—that you should send ambassadors to Thebes to ask them to give you free passage through their country for the march against Philip. But the officials in Thebes, ashamed lest they should seem in reality to be traitors to Hellas, turned from the thought of peace, and threw themselves into he became frantic, and went forward to the platform and stigmatized the Boeotarchs as traitors to Hellas, and declared that he would move a decree—he, who never looked on the face of an enemy in arms !—that you should send ambassadors to Thebes to ask them to give you free passage through their country for the march against Philip. But the officials in Thebes, ashamed lest they should seem in reality to be traitors to Hellas, turned from the thought of peace, and threw themselves into
Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 161 (search)
nder was at first bitterly angry—naturallyPhilip's death was immediately followed by revolutionary movements centering in Thebes and Athens. The reference here is to Alexander's sudden descent upon Thebes, with the Thessalians as his supporters.—andThebes, with the Thessalians as his supporters.—and when the army was near Thebes, Demosthenes, who had been elected ambassador by you, turned back when halfway across Cithaeron and came running home—useless in peace and war alike! And worst of all: while you did not surrender himAfter the destructiThebes, Demosthenes, who had been elected ambassador by you, turned back when halfway across Cithaeron and came running home—useless in peace and war alike! And worst of all: while you did not surrender himAfter the destruction of Thebes and the suppression of the revolt elsewhere, Alexander demanded the surrender of Demosthenes and other anti-Macedonian Athenian statesmen. nor allow him to be brought to trial in the synod of the Greeks, he has betrayed you now, if curreThebes and the suppression of the revolt elsewhere, Alexander demanded the surrender of Demosthenes and other anti-Macedonian Athenian statesmen. nor allow him to be brought to trial in the synod of the Greeks, he has betrayed you now, if current repor
Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 237 (search)
But if you turn to the second part of your decree, in which you have had the effrontery to write that he is a good man, and “constantly speaks and does what is best for the Athenian people,” omit the pretence and the bombast of your decree, and take hold of the facts, and show us what you mean. I pass by his corruption in the case of the Amphissians and Euboeans; but when you give Demosthenes the credit for the alliance with Thebes, you deceive the ignorant and insult the sensible and well informed. For in failing to mention the crisis and the prestige of these your fellow citizens, which were the real reasons why the alliance was made, you think you prevent our seeing that you are crowning Demosthenes with the credit which belongs to the c
Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 239 (search)
, but of his own accord, three hundred talents to the people, which they were wise enough to refuse. Now what brought the gold was the crisis, and his fear, and his need of allies. And this same thing it was that brought about the alliance with Thebes. But you, Demosthenes, tire us out with your everlasting talk of Thebes and of that most ill-starred alliance, while you are silent as to the seventy talents of the king's gold which you have seized and embezzled.It appears that when Athens refuhenes, tire us out with your everlasting talk of Thebes and of that most ill-starred alliance, while you are silent as to the seventy talents of the king's gold which you have seized and embezzled.It appears that when Athens refused the 300 talents which had been brought from the king of Persia to help in organizing a revolt against Alexander, the Persian envoys put at least a part of the gold into Demosthenes' hands, in the expectation that he would use it in unofficial efforts against Macedon.
Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 240 (search)
Was it not for lack of money, nay, for lack of five talents, that the mercenaries failed to deliver up the citadel to the Thebans?After Thebes revolted from Alexander, her citadel was still held by a garrison of his mercenaries. And when all the Arcadians were mobilized and their leaders were ready to bring aid, did not the negotiations fail for want of nine talents of silver?This accusation is elaborated in Deinarchus' speech against Demosthenes (Dein. 1.18-21). He says that the Arcadians came up as far as the Isthmus, and that their general offered their services for ten talents, but that Demosthenes refused to furnish the money to the Thebans, who were conducting the negotiations, and so the Arcadian general sold out to the Macedonians and led his troops home. But you are a rich man, you serve as choregusThe rich Athenian took his turn in serving the city as choregus, contributing to meet the expenses of some state festival. Demosthenes, too, is a rich man of the choregus class, b
Aeschylus, Persians (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.), line 1 (search)
ainst its youthful King, nor does any courier or horsemanarrive at the city of the Persians, who left behind them the walled defence of Susa and Agbatana and Cissa's ancient ramparts, and went forth, some on horseback, some in galleys, others on footpresenting a dense array of war. Such are Amistres and Artaphrenes and Megabates and Astaspes, marshals of the Persians; kings themselves, yet vassals of the Great King,they press on, commanders of an enormous host, skilled in archery and horsemanship, formidable to look upon and fearful in battle through the valiant resolve of their souls. Artembares, too, who fights from his chariot,and Masistres, and noble Imaeus, skilled with the bow, and Pharandaces, and Sosthanes, who urges on his steeds. Others in addition the mighty, fecund Nile sent forth — Susiscanes,Pegastagon of Egyptian lineage, mighty Arsames, lord of sacred Memphis, Ariomardus, governor of ancient Thebes, and the marsh-dwelling oarsmen,well-skilled and countless in numbe
Andocides, On the Peace, section 18 (search)
And she is sacrificing this supremacy, not because we forced her to do so, but in order to give the whole of Greece its independence. The Spartans have now won three battles: the first at CorinthJuly 394. The Spartans met the allied forces of Thebes, Athens, Corinth, and Argos at Nemea, between Corinth and Sicyon, and heavily defeated them. The battle was fought before Agesilaus, who had been recalled from Asia Minor, had reached Greece. against the full allied forces, who were left with no excuse for their defeat, save only that the Spartans, with none to aid them, fought more bravely than all the rest together; the second in Boeotia under Agesilaus,The battle of Coronea, fought a fortnight or so after Nemea. The allied forces attempted to block the passage of Agesilaus as he marched southwards through Boeotia on his homeward journey from Asia Minor. The Spartans were victorious, but sustained heavy losses; and Agesilaus was content to continue his march without halting. when
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
son of Pheres, from Pherae; Ancaeus and Cepheus, sons of Lycurgus, from Arcadia; Jason, son of Aeson, from Iolcus; Iphicles, son of Amphitryon, from Thebes; Pirithous, son of Ixion, from Larissa; Peleus, son of Aeacus, from Phthia; Telamon, son of Aeacus, from Salamis; Eurytion, son of Actor, froBeing arraigned by Agrius, he fled to Argos and came to Adrastus, whose daughter Deipyle he married and begat Diomedes. Tydeus marched against Thebes with Adrastus,See below, Apollod. 3.6.3ff. and died of a wound which he received at the hand of Melanippus. But the sons of Agrius, to wit,h of Telephus in Arcadia, and killed him. But Diomedes conveyed the corpse to Argos and buried him in the place where now a city is called Oenoe after him.Compare Paus. 2.25.2. And having married Aegialia, daughter of Adrastus or, as some say, of Aegialeus, he went to the wars against Thebes and Troy.
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
Lysimache, daughter of Abas, son of Melampus, and had by her Adrastus, Parthenopaeus, Pronax, Mecisteus, Aristomachus, and Eriphyle, whom Amphiaraus married. Parthenopaeus had a son Promachus, who marched with the Epigoni against Thebes;Compare below, Apollod. 3.7.2. and Mecisteus had a son Euryalus, who went to Troy.See Hom. Il. 2.565ff. Pronax had a son Lycurgus; and Adrastus had by Amphithea, daughter of Pronax, three daughters, Argia, Deipyle, and , a gift of Hephaestus; they had brazen feet and puffed fire from their mouths. These creatures Aeetes ordered him to yoke and to sow dragon's teeth; for he had got from Athena half of the dragon's teeth which Cadmus sowed in Thebes.Compare Ap. Rhod., Argon. iii.401ff., 1176ff. While Jason puzzled how he could yoke the bulls, Medea conceived a passion for him; now she was a witch, daughter of Aeetes and Idyia, daughter of Ocean. And fearing lest he mig
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
Amphitryon went with Alcmena and Licymnius to Thebes and was purified by CreonThat is, for tPerseus, from Helos in Argolis, and Creon from Thebes, Amphitryon ravaged the islands of the Comaetho, and sailed with the booty to Thebes,In the sanctuary of Ismenian Apollo at Thebes, the historian Herodotus saw a tripod bearing an inscription in “Cadmean let in them. But before Amphitryon reached Thebes, Zeus came by night and prolonging the us was a brother of Orpheus; he came to Thebes and became a Theban, but was killed by e his death. So Erginus marched against Thebes, and after slaughtering not a few of thgnant at this outrage, Erginus marched against Thebes. But Hercules, having received weapons from one and set it up in a sacred grove at Thebes, where was a shrine of Alcmena. Meanti 9.16.7) that there was no tomb of Alcmena at Thebes, because at her death she had been turned to [1 more...]<
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