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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
ssed and well-nigh exhausted. The brigade of Pickett (under Garnett) and that of Kemper were hurrince of Doubleday. The brigades of Kemper and Pickett (the latter under Garnett) must have fought ve thousand under the immediate command of General Pickett, with heavy masses in their vicinity. Hee attack. Of course, the old rebel knew that Pickett was not there in person and that there were nen before him un der the immediate command of Pickett. But Doubleday's belief of the story is a trJones, consisting of the brigades of Drayton, Pickett, Jenkins, G. T. Anderson, and Kemper; and 3 buth Mountain of four of the five regiments of Pickett's brigade given officially,--the 19th Regimengiments, we have 480 as the number o f men in Pickett's brigade at South Mountain. But the report so that Garnett had in the battle but 400 of Pickett's men. From Kemper's brigade we have but one d show that Kemper's brigade was smaller than Pickett's. On page 907 we have the only report fro
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
ombs (in temporary command of a division), Col. Henry L. Benning: 2d Ga., Lieut.-Col. William R. Holmes (k), Maj. Skidmore Harris (w); 15th Ga., Col. William T. Millican (k); 17th Ga., Capt. J. A. McGregor; 20th Ga., Col. John B. Cumming. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 16; w, 122; in, 22 = 160. Drayton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thomas F. Drayton: 50th Ga., Lieut.-Col. F. Kearse; 51st Ga.,----; 15th S. C., Col. W. D. De Saussure. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 82; w, 280; m, 179 = 541. Pickett's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Richard B. Garnett: 8th Va., Col. Eppa Hunton; 18th Va., Maj. George C. Cabell; 19th Va., Col. J. B. Strange (m w), Capt. John L. Cochran, Lieut. William N. Wood; 28th Va., Capt. W. L. Wingfield; 56th Va., Col. William D. Stuart, Capt. John B. McPhail. Brigade loss (in the campaign): k, 30; w, 199; m, 32 = 261. Kemper's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James L. Kemper: 1st Va.,----; 7th Va.,----; 11th Va., Maj. Adam Clement; 17th Va., Col. Montgomery D. Corse (w), Maj. Arthur Herb
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
their indomitable qualities by losses nearly equal to the whole force of their opponent, when ordered to another sacrifice, even under such a soldier as Hancock, answered the demand as one man, with a silent and stolid inertia: General Francis A. Walker, in his History of the Second army Corps, says, p. 516, that Hancock declined the responsibility of renewing the attack as ordered by Meade; and that the statement that the troops refused to advance is erroneous.--editors. at Gettysburg, Pickett, when waiting for the signal which Longstreet dreaded to repeat, for the hopeless but immortal charge against Cemetery Hill, saluted and said, as he turned to his ready column: I shall move forward, sir! Nor must we give slight importance to the influence of the Southern women, who in agony of heart girded the sword upon their loved ones and bade them go. It was to be expected that these various influences would give a confidence to leadership that would tend to bold adventure, and leave
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
ver and forming my left, R. H. Anderson's division; on Marye's Hill, Ransom's and McLaws's divisions; on Telegraph Hill, Pickett's division; to the right and about Deep Run Creek, Hood's division, the latter stretching across Deep Run Bottom. Onthat the enemy, to reach him, would have to put himself in a pocket and be subjected to attack from Jackson on one side, Pickett and McLaws on the other, and Hood's own men in front. The position of Franklin's men on the 12th, with the configuratiose Jackson's line should be broken, to wheel around to his right and strike in on the attacking bodies, telling him that Pickett, with his division, would be ordered to join in the flank movement. These orders were given to both division generals, always its best guarded point. During the attack upon General Jackson, and immediately after his line was broken, General Pickett rode up to General Hood and suggested that the moment was at hand for the movement anticipated by my orders, and req
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The confederate left at Fredericksburg. (search)
ir rear. As this would leave my troops in the sunken road with their left flank unprotected, and at the mercy of the enemy, should they come up on my left, I went over to General Longstreet and represented to him that if this were done I would have to provide in some other way for the protection of the troops in the sunken road, or move them out, so soon as there was a lull in the attack, which would be virtually giving up the defense of Marye's Hill. General Longstreet at once ordered General Pickett to reinforce Anderson, and directed Anderson to hold his position until forced back. I then went over and examined the ground where Anderson's force was on my left, and finding that the preparations for defense made to resist an assault were incomplete and inconsiderable, I thought it best to take measures to protect my own flank with my own troops, and therefore directed General Kershaw to take his brigade, and, sending two of his regiments to strengthen General Cobb's line Brigadie
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Ransom's division at Fredericksburg. (search)
l points of interest. General Lee, in his report of the battle of Fredericksburg, December 13th, 1862, writes as follows: . . . Longstreet's corps constituted our left, with Anderson's division resting upon the river, and those of McLaws, Pickett, and Hood extending to the right in the order named. Ransom's division supported the batteries on Marye's and Willis's hills, at the foot of which Cobb's brigade of McLaws's division and the 24th North Carolina of Ransom's brigade were stationeith the immediate care of the point attacked, with orders to send forward additional reenforcements if it should become necessary, and to use Featherston's brigade of Anderson's division if he should require it. And continuing, I directed Major-General Pickett to send me two of his brigades: one, Kemper's, was sent to General Ransom to be placed in some secure position to be ready in case it should be wanted. And again, I would also mention, as particularly distinguished in the engagement of t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., A hot day on Marye's Heights. (search)
iller and Lieutenant McElroy, in the center; two 3-inch rifle-guns of the 1st Company, under Captain Squires and Lieutenant Brown, on the left, next to a little brick-house and in front of the Welford graveyard, and one 10-pounder Parrott rifle, under Lieutenant Galbraith, of the 1st Company, next to the Plank road leading into Fredericksburg. The 2d Company, under Captain Richardson, with four Napoleon guns, moved on across the Telegraph road to the right, and reported as ordered to General Pickett for service with his troops. Without delay the men made the redoubts as snug as possible, and finding the epaulements not to their liking, went to work with pick and shovel throwing the dirt a little higher, and fashioning embrasures to fire through. The engineers objected, and said they were ruining the works, but the cannoneers said, We have to fight here, not you; we will arrange them to suit ourselves. And General Longstreet approvingly said, If you save the finger of a man's han
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Fredericksburg, Va. (search)
44 == 89. Artillery: La. Battery (Donaldsonville Art'y), Capt. Victor Maurin; Va. Battery, Capt. Frank Huger; Va. Battery, Capt. John W. Lewis; Va. Battery (Norfolk Light Art'y Blues), Lieut. William T. Peet. Artillery loss: k, 1; w, 8 == 9. Pickett's division, Maj.-Gen. George E. Pickett. Garnett's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Richard B. Garnett: 8th Va.,----; 18th Va.,----; 19th Va.,----; 28th Va.,----; 56th Va.,----. Armistead's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lewis A. Armistead: 9th Va.,----; 14th Va.,--Maj.-Gen. George E. Pickett. Garnett's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Richard B. Garnett: 8th Va.,----; 18th Va.,----; 19th Va.,----; 28th Va.,----; 56th Va.,----. Armistead's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lewis A. Armistead: 9th Va.,----; 14th Va.,----; 38th Va.,----; 53d Va.,----; 57th Va.,----. Kemper's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James L. Kemper: 1st Va.,----; 3d Va.,----; 7th Va.,----; 11th Va.,----; 24th Va.,----. Jenkins's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Micah Jenkins: 1st S. C. (Hagood's); 2d S. C. Rifles,----; 5th S. C.,----; 6th S. C.,----; Hampton (S. C.) Legion,----; Palmetto (S. C.) Sharp-shooters,----. Corse's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Montgomery D. Corse: 15th Va.,----; 17th Va.,----; 30th Va.,----; 32d Va.,----. Artillery (composition incomplete): Va
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Confederate army. (search)
The Confederate army. army of Northern Virginia.--General Robert E. Lee. First Army Corps. Lieut.-Gen. James Longstreet, with Hood's and Pickett's divisions and Dearing's and Henry's artillery battalions, absent in South-eastern Virginia. McLaws's division, Maj.-Gen. Lafayette McLaws. Wofford's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. T. Wofford: 16th Ga.,----; The dash indicates that the name of the commanding officer has not been found in the Official Records.--editors. 18th Ga.,----; 24th Ga.,----; Cobb's (Ga.) Legion,----; Phillips's (Ga.) Legion,----. Brigade loss: k, 74; w, 479; m, 9 = 562. Semmes's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Paul J. Semmes: 10th Ga., Lieut.-Col. W. C. Holt; 50th Ga., Lieut.-Col. F. Kearse; 51st Ga., Col. W. M. Slaughter (k), Lieut.-Col. Edward Ball (w); 53d Ga., Col. James P. Simms. Brigade loss: k, 85; w, 492; m, 26 =603. Kershaw's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Joseph B. Kershaw: 2d S. C., Col. John D. Kennedy; 3d S. C., Maj. R. C. Maffett; 7th S. C., Col. Elbert Bland; 8th S.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
ensive, he could at least clear the valley of Virginia of the enemy,--a distinct operation, yet a necessary preliminary to an invasion of the North. This work was assigned to Lieutenant-General Ewell, an able officer, in every way qualified for such an enterprise. In anticipation of the new campaign, Lee's army was strengthened and reorganized into three army-corps of three divisions each. Each division consisted of four brigades, except Rodes's and Anderson's, which had five each, and Pickett's, which had three at Gettysburg,--in all, thirty-seven infantry brigades. The cavalry were the select troops of the Confederacy. Officers and men had been accustomed all their lives to the use of horses and arms, and to the very end the best blood in the land rode after Stuart, Hampton, and the Lees. They were now organized as a division, under Major-General J. E. B. Stuart, consisting of the six brigades of Hampton, Robertson, Fitzhugh Lee, Jenkins, W. E. Jones, and W. H. F. Lee, and s
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