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all things visible in their natural colours and proportions. To the good work of placing upon record the actual truth in relation to the lives and characters of Stuart and some other noble soldiers of the Southern army, the writer of this page has here brought a few of his recollections-aiming to draw these worthies rather as ths of the actor in the drama, his character and endowments; and to know what great men are, is better than to know what they perform. What Lee, Jackson, Johnston, Stuart, and their associates accomplished, history will record; how they looked, and moved, and spoke, will attract much less attention from the historian of the future.ckson was a noble human soul; pure, generous, fearless, of imperial genius for making war; but why claim for him personal graces, and the charm of social humour? Stuart ranked justly with the two or three greatest cavalry commanders of the world, and in his character combined gaiety, courage, resolution, winning manners, and the
cares of command. So it rattled on still, and Stuart continued to laugh, without caring much about his feather and fight with him. With all this, Stuart was delighted. He gave them positions on his or-but it is hard to please the Sleek family. Stuart was married, a great public character, had fouhe hammer was shattered by the anvil. V. Stuart was forced, by the necessities of the struggleLee's little fold. It was here, I think, that Stuart vindicated his capacity to fight infantry, fore an obstinate, often desperate struggle — on Stuart's part to hold his ground; on the enemy's partand what was not done. In Spotsylvania, after Stuart's fall, he exclaimed: If Stuart only were hereng point, the family likeness in the traits of Stuart and Prince Rupert is very curious. Both were e foregoing presents as accurate an outline of Stuart as the present writer, after a close associatiille, and Stuart succeeded him: Go back to General Stuart and tell him to act upon his own judgment,[67 more...]
orks near New Cold Harbour, when the writer of this was sent by General Stuart to ascertain if Jackson's corps had gone in, and what were his evening, in the midst of a furious shelling, riding slowly with General Stuart among his guns; his face lit up by the burning brushwood — a fariding about by himself; and he tied his horse, lay down beside General Stuart, and began with, Well, yesterday's was the most terrific fire oospitable family were one day visited by Generals Lee, Jackson, and Stuart, when a little damsel of fourteen confided to her friend General Le never more struck with this than one day at Fredericksburg, at General Stuart's headquarters. There was an indifferent brochure published inolina brigade behind him in line of battle was doing likewise. General Stuart read it with bursts of laughter to his friend, and Jackson also cross the Rapidan? His manner was unmistakable. It said: My dear Stuart, all that is no doubt very amusing to you, and I laugh because you
aced under him, and the brigade became a portion of Stuart's command. It soon made its mark. Here are some ohe later cavalry leaders on the Federal side, when, Stuart having fallen, Hampton commanded the whole Virginiain physical nor mental conformation did he resemble Stuart, the ideal cavalier-Forrest, the rough-rider-or the had the composed demeanour of a man of middle age. Stuart loved brilliant colours, gay scenes, and the sparkl jacket — there never lived a more heroic soul than Stuart --but that in this was shown the individuality of each. The one-Stuart — was young, gay, a West Pointer, and splendid in his merriment, elan, and abandon. The oshady yard of Hanover Court-House, to talk with General Stuart under the trees there. What the eye saw in tho The soldier and huntsman was also a poet, and General Stuart spoke in high praise of his writings. His prosd in the cause which they had espoused. During General Stuart's life, Hampton was second in command of the Vi
and again became a private. He returned to the ranks; but his energy and activity had been frequently exhibited, and General Stuart, who possessed a remarkable talent for discovering conspicuous military merit of any sort in obscure persons, speedilto come out. I am not aware that he gained any reputation in the campaign of 1862. He was considered, however, by General Stuart an excellent scout and partisan; and the General once related to the present writer with great glee, the manner in won with Mosby, who seemed to enjoy them greatly; but in the spring of 1862 the tables were turned upon the partisan. General Stuart sent him from the Chickahominy to carry a confidential message to General Jackson, then in the Valley. He was restinrse was feeding, when a detachment of Federal cavalry surprised and captured him-making prize also of a private note from Stuart to Jackson, and a copy of Napoleon's Maxims accompanying it. Mosby was carried to the Old Capitol, but was soon exchanged
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Hardeman Stuart: the young Captain of the signal corps. (search)
Hardeman Stuart: the young Captain of the signal corps. I. I never knew a braver or lovelier spirit than Hardeman Stuart's. When the wave of war rolled over his young head and swept him awahe served as a volunteer upon the staff of General Stuart. He was the model of an aide-de-camp thatgive battle to Pope on the Rapidan. Here Hardeman Stuart left us, in performance of his duties as is my last meeting and last greeting with Hardeman Stuart. I was riding, about noon, to the front of Longstreet's line in search of General Stuart. Under a tree, immediately in rear of his front libut full of fight. Learning from him that General Stuart was just on the right of his line, I rode ion, How d'ye, Captain! and I recognised Hardeman Stuart. But what a change! He had always bed rest his soul! Such was the fate of Hardeman Stuart — an event which brought the tears to manccurred a day or two after the battle. General Stuart followed the enemy on Sunday, and coming u[3 more...]
ver knew a braver or lovelier spirit than Hardeman Stuart's. When the wave of war rolled over his yhe served as a volunteer upon the staff of General Stuart. He was the model of an aide-de-camp thatn, and he now secured, through his cousin, General Stuart, the commission of captain in the signal cttles around Richmond soon came to an end. General Stuart broke up his headquarters in the old grasshe front of Longstreet's line in search of General Stuart. Under a tree, immediately in rear of hisbut full of fight. Learning from him that General Stuart was just on the right of his line, I rode ion, How d'ye, Captain! and I recognised Hardeman Stuart. But what a change! He had always bed rest his soul! Such was the fate of Hardeman Stuart — an event which brought the tears to manccurred a day or two after the battle. General Stuart followed the enemy on Sunday, and coming uin possession of one of the men was found Hardeman Stuart's coat, captured with his horse and accou[2 more...]
tions at all, watching and fighting all along the front. Let justice be done to all; and it is not the noble infantry or artillery of the late army of Northern Virginia who will be guilty of injustice to their brethren of the cavalry, who, under Stuart, Ashby, Hampton, and the Lees, did that long, hard work, leaving Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania strewed with their dead bodies. But a comparison of the relative value of the different arms was not the writer's purpose. His aim was to ppomatox. It is simply not possible that he could utter a word against those heroes of the infantry and artillery whom he is proud to call his comrades; but he remembers with most interest and pleasure the gay days when he-followed the feather of Stuart, that fleur des chevaliers. In the saddle, near that good knight of the nineteenth century, war became a splendid drama, rather than mere bloody work; a great stage, whereon the scenes were ever shifting, and the exits were all made to the sound
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Stuart's ride around McClellan in June, 1862. (search)
adquarters, and the glance of the blue eyes of Stuart at that moment was as brilliant as the lightniape against ten of capture or destruction. Stuart had decided upon his course with that rapidityed back and reported, and the ringing voice of Stuart ordered Form platoons! Draw sabre! Charge! ole companies went to sleep in the saddle, and Stuart himself was no exception. He had thrown one kn aching void which it was necessary to fill. Stuart gave his personal superintendence to the work,low. There, besides, was the artillery, which Stuart had no intention of leaving. A regular bridgetillery horses. Standing in the boat beneath, Stuart worked with the men, and as the planks thunders rear-guard as it passed the swamp. Iv. Stuart had thus eluded his pursuers, and was over theheard, had been electrified by the rumour that Stuart was down at the river trying to get across, anwas obliged to decline; my horse was worn out. Stuart set out by himself, rode all night, and befor[41 more...]
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., Stuart on the outpost: a scene at camp Qui Vive (search)
lding the lines of Centreville against McClellan; and when Stuart, that pearl of cavaliers, was in command of the front, whi61, I saw the gay cavalier and his queer surroundings. Stuart was already famous from his raids against General Pattersod enabled him to pass whole days and nights in the saddle, Stuart became the evil genius of the invading column; and long af far from it you see the grim muzzle of a Blakely gun, for Stuart is devoted to artillery, and fights it whenever he can. Yo duty, for he snaps at everybody. You will find, when General Stuart comes out laughing to show him to you, that his owner saddle, and a hand for the rein and the sabre unsurpassed, Stuart was truly a splendid machine in magnificent order, and plafull with laughter, or flash at the thought of battle. In Stuart I saw a cavalier whom Rupert would have made his bosom frir King Charles without a murmur. Gayest of the gay was Stuart's greeting, and in five minutes he had started up, put on
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