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The Daily Dispatch: August 23, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 2, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Theatre. --During the first week of her engagement, Miss Josephine Guggenheim has proved herself a most available actress in the delineation of comedy, and this, with her personal attractions, ought to ensure her a heavy welcome at the opening of the second week.--We did not have the pleasure of seeing her in the excellent comedy of An Unequal March" which was produced on Friday and Saturday nights; but have been informed that her acting was really superb. To night we are to have another of Tom Taylor's comedies, called "The Babes in the Wood," a new piece, never produced here, and we predict for the handsome young actress another triumph.
Theatre. --The delightful comedy, by Tom Taylor, entitled "The Babes in the Wood," will be repeated to-night, and we truly hope the weather may prove favorable, and afford the ladies an opportunity of witnessing a performance ensuring so much gratification. Miss Joey Gougenheim plays the leading character, and all the parts are judiciously distributed. We have been informed, by those who saw it on Tuesday night, that it is one of the most amusing comedies ever produced in Richmond, while the lessons inculcated may be profitably studied by every one. As this is the opinion advanced by those who are competent judges of dramatic matters, we have no hesitation in advising our readers to go and see it. An amusing afterpiece will conclude the entertainment.
Theatre. --A well-filled house on Wednesday night testified to the popularity of Tom Taylor's comedy of "An Unequal Match." The piece had been produced twice before during Miss Gougenheim's engagement, and on its third representation the audience was more numerous than on either of the previous occasions. The chief merit of this comedy, in our view, consists in its light, smooth, racy dialogue, which amuses the listener throughout, yet never offends. The character of Hester Grazebrook is one in which uncommon spirit and confidence are required to produce an effect; and we are sustained by many excellent judges in the opinion that it was splendidly rendered by Miss Gougenheim. In the last act, where she turns the tables upon her artful rival, and brings about a happy denouement, the audience seemed absolutely carried away with delight. Miss Ida Vernon played the part of Mrs. Montressor with a correct appreciation of its meaning, and Mr Howe is entitled to the same compliment f
th Regiment stationed in Hyde. On one of the prisoners a letter was found from the preacher Taylor, who, it is said, assisted the Lincolnites in making a landing on Hatteras Island. The letter was addressed to his brother-in-law in Cumberland county, in which county Taylor married, and, we think, formerly lived.--Taylor says that he and others were obliged to take the oath of have their property destroyed. A poor excuse, The letter shows that Taylor is now a regular Lincolnites sympathizer. th Regiment stationed in Hyde. On one of the prisoners a letter was found from the preacher Taylor, who, it is said, assisted the Lincolnites in making a landing on Hatteras Island. The letter was addressed to his brother-in-law in Cumberland county, in which county Taylor married, and, we think, formerly lived.--Taylor says that he and others were obliged to take the oath of have their property destroyed. A poor excuse, The letter shows that Taylor is now a regular Lincolnites sympathizer.
using themselves generally.--Just as a portion of them sat down to dinner, Col. Tom Taylor, of the 1st Kentucky Regiment, came up to the foot of the hill and preparegan to think that the fight they had entered was not a free fight after all. Col. Taylor kept them at it, however, and has them as well drilled, probably, as any menurally dating dispositions and skill in woodmanscraft generally get to be. Col. Tom Taylor, the commander of the 1st Kentucky regiment is as fine a specimen of a manable to all, and much admired by his men. Added to his other qualifications, Col. Taylor has a voice that a lion might be proud of, and powerful enough to life a smaiving them a big scare, and seeing them some distance on their journey home, Col. Taylor withdrew from the hill. Later in the evening a party of ten went back to re" asked the doctor. "The rebels" was the reply. Just at the moment Col. Taylor came up, and one of the party said:"Colonel, here is a friend who says the r
Columbus Guards, Capt Ellis, of the 2d Georgia regiment, from which position he has lately been transferred. Lieut. Col. Tom Taylor of the 1st Kentucky, has been promoted to a Colonelcy, and continues in command of the regiment Major Johnston (stenant-Colonel, and Captain Jo. Desha. of company C, son of Gen. Lucius Desha, of Kentucky, has been appointed Major, Col. Taylor, of whom I have frequently spoken in my letters, has now one of the finest camps at this post, and his men are progresers of military discipline, I am inclined to believe there are few more orderly or better disciplined regiments here. Col. Taylor is anxious to have his teachings put to some practical use in the field, and I hope he may have an opportunity before for themselves since their State was blazed out by Daniel Boone, we are accustomed to expect a great deal from them. Col. Taylor feels that great dependence is put upon his deadly r fles, and takes good care to keep his powder dry and his regiment
ve some force near Annandale, and along the line from there to Falls Church and Lewinsville. From the top of the hotel in Fairfax we could still see the Stars and Stripes flying from Upton's Hill, and also the line of their fortifications by Taylor's and White's hills. No other changes were visible except those made by the fall of the leaves, which gave a less obstructed view of their works. I believe there has been no advance since we left the town, except by small parties of scouts. I erely. If General McClellan does not fight, the Government can get no more men or money, and public opinion is pressing him very hard. Thursday night, the Hon. W. C. Preston, former Minister to Spain, paid a visit to the Kentucky camp, Col. Tom Taylor, and spent the night with his friends. During the evening he made them a speech, which was loudly cheered, and which gave great pleasure to the soldiers. Visits from such men, and speeches to the volunteers has a good effect, and seems to
The Daily Dispatch: November 13, 1861., [Electronic resource], A card from Miss Joey Guggenheim--she refuses to play on Sunday . (search)
of making me appear in old pieces, and of keeping the "Elves" to their own especial profit, or merely to frighten me, I cannot say. At any rate, the first thing I saw yestereay morning in the newspapers, was an announcement to the effect that I was that evening to appear in the "Elves." During the day, however, my agent received a letter from the manager, stating that I had broken my engagement with the Metropolitan Theatre by not playing on Sunday, and by not sending him the manuscript of Tom Taylor's "Overland Route;" consequently he would not allow me to perform that evening. Now, the claiming of manuscripts was simply an idle excuse. By the statement of the machinist, the scenes could not be prepared in two weeks; and I may state here that it is not usual for artists to give into uncertain managerial hands valuable manuscripts two weeks before they can be made legitimate use of. Besides, the manager knew that the parts were not even copied out, and that I was hard at work on the
anded. But fortune, as if tired of persecuting us, favored us with a streak of good luck. Capt. Tom Taylor, of the C. S. A., was appointed our Lieut. Col. and placed in command over us; this hushed , and a blither or gayer set cannot be found in the army. Under the excellent tuition of Col. Taylor, we made rapid progress in battalion drill; and now we elicit compliments from the Commanding Generals for the ease and rapidity of our movements. Colonel Taylor has shown himself the "right man for the right place." He found us as scattered and disorganized as the "children of the Mist;" and, by his unremitting exertions, he has perfected us both in drill and discipline. Lieutenant Colonel Taylor was promoted to Colonel, and William Preston Johnston, son of General Albert S. Johnston,l who need assistance. He has done much for the cause of Southern Rights in Kentucky. Col. Tom Taylor is justly very proud of his regiment, and takes great pains in drilling them, and in the he
The Daily Dispatch: December 23, 1861., [Electronic resource], Sudden death on
Pennsylvania Avenue
, Washington. (search)
l. A. J. Secrest; the 10th Alabama, Col. John H. Forney; the 1st Kentucky, Col. Tom Taylor; the Sumter Flying Artillery, Capt. Cutts; and detachments from Ransom's a, killing five of the South Carolinians. The error was soon discovered, and Col. Taylor advanced cautiously to the left, and soon after came in sight of another regiment but a few yards away. To be sure there was no mistake, Col. Taylor shouted to the Colonel, and asked who he was? "The Colonel of the 9th," was the reply.s, "we are friends, South Carolinians." "On which side are you?" asked Colonel Taylor. "For the Union," and immediately after the Colonel gave the command t to the rear in good order, both sides having ceased firing.--At this time Col. Tom Taylor rode to the right to see what disposition had been made of his neighbors, N. English, slightly; Thomas Calhoun, slightly. First Kentucky--Col. Tom. Taylor. Company A.--Corp. E. Long, C. Cable, and J. Parker — missing. Company
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