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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 1 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
Editorial paragraphs. Our Contributors have placed us under many obligations for the valuable papers they have furnished us, and we beg that they will have patience if their articles do not appear promptly. We have on hand a number of papers, reports, &c., which we are anxious to publish at the earliest possible moment, but we are unable to crowd into our pages more than they will hold. On page 137 (March No.) the types make General Taylor speak of the fame of Dubois, when he wrote Louvois, who was, at the time alluded to, the War Minister of Louis the Fourteenth. Our General agent in the West, General George D. Johnston, continues to be most successful in his canvass, and to meet a cordial reception wherever he goes in Tennessee. In Nashville, Clarksville, and Jackson he has secured more than 350 subscribers. He is just beginning the canvass of Memphis. We again commend him as a gallant soldier and an accomplished gentleman every way worthy of confidence and est
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Numerical strength of the armies at Gettysburg. (search)
Numerical strength of the armies at Gettysburg. by Colonel Walter H. Taylor, A. A. G., A. N. V. [The following explanation and correction of his former article was sent by Colonel Taylor simultaneously to the Philadelphia Times and to us. We exceedingly regret that its publication in our Papers has been unavoidably delayed until now:] As my account of the battle of Gettysburg was first given to the public in your columns, I respectfully ask space therein sufficient to make the following Colonel Taylor simultaneously to the Philadelphia Times and to us. We exceedingly regret that its publication in our Papers has been unavoidably delayed until now:] As my account of the battle of Gettysburg was first given to the public in your columns, I respectfully ask space therein sufficient to make the following explanation and correction of the statement of the strength of the Confederate Army then made in that campaign: I would premise with the mention of the fact that two kinds of returns of the strength of the army were required to be made to the Department during the war — the one a field return, made twice a month (on the 10th and 20th), and the other a monthly return, made on the last day of each month. In the field returns there was a column for the officers present for duty, and one for e
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel Taylor's reply to the Count of Paris. (search)
Colonel Taylor's reply to the Count of Paris. Norfolk, Va., March 8, 1878. Rev. J. William Jones, Secretary, &c., Richmond, Va.: My dear Mr. Jones: In compliance with your request, I enclose herewith the copy of the memorandum of the Count of Paris concerning the strength of the two armies at Gettysburg, sent to me by Colonel Allan. I have only found time to read the same to-day. It is, in my judgment, as conclusive evidence as has yet been presented of the great disparity in the str about 115,000 effective, officers and enlisted men, present for duty. Compare our 67,000 to their 100,000 or 105,000, or compare our 74,000 to their 115,000; but do not compare our maximum 74,000 with their minimum 95,000. Yours, truly, W. H. Taylor. P. S. In an article contributed to the Weekly Times of Philadelphia, March 10th, General Humphreys, U. S. A., rather confirms my estimate of the strength of the Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg. According to his statement, the return
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Longstreet's Second paper on Gettysburg. (search)
nwhile I received a note from General Lee. He had heard my guns, and at once supposed I had thought it best to relieve Jackson in a different manner from that indidicated by his orders. He therefore wrote that if I had found anything better than reinforcing Jackson, to pursue it. I mention this incident simply to show the official relations that existed between General Lee and myself. As to our personal relations I present two letters throwing light upon that subject. One is from Colonel W. H. Taylor, assistant adjutant general, and the other is from General Lee himself: headquarters army of Northern Virginia, April 26, 1864. My dear General: I have received your note of yesterday, and have consulted the General about reviewing your command. He directs me to say that he has written to the President to know if he can visit and review the army this week, and until his reply is received the General cannot say when he can visit you. He is anxious to see you, and it will give
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reply to General Longstreet's Second paper. (search)
turmoil of battle. The Federals gave way before our troops, fell back in disorder, and fled precipitately, leaving their dead and wounded on the field. During their retreat the artillery opened with destructive power upon the fugitive masses. The infantry followed until darkness put an end to the pursuit. After giving his statement of the operations at Second Manassas, to show the official relations between. General Lee and himself, General Longstreet gives two letters, one from Colonel Taylor and the other from General Lee, to show the kindly personal relations that existed between himself and General Lee and his staff, a matter which no one will pretend to controvert, but which all will say ought to have prevented General Longstreet's insidious efforts to undermine the military fame of one who had been so kind, so indulgent, so magnanimous to him under all circumstances. It may be observed here, that, while General Longstreet has given a letter from General Lee to him, wr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
and on the left). Early's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Jubal A. Early (w), Col. D. K. McRae: 5th N. C., Col. D. K. McRae; 23d N. C., Col. John P. Hoke, Maj. Daniel H. Christie; 24th Va., Col. William R. Terry (w), Major Richard L. Maury; 38th Va., Lieut.-Col. Powhatan B. Whittle. Brigade loss (except 5th N. C., not reported): k, 30; w, 106; m, 70=206. Rodes's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. E. Rodes: 5th Ala., Col. C. C. Pegues; 6th Ala., Col. John B. Gordon; 12th Ala., Col. R. T. Jones; 12th Miss., Col. W. H. Taylor. Rains's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. G. J. Rains: 13th Ala., Col. B. D. Fry; 26th Ala., Col. E. A. O'Neal; 6th Ga., Col. A. H. Colquitt; 23d Ga., Col. Thos. Hutcherson. Featherston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston: 27th Ga., Col. Levi B. Smith; 28th Ga., Col. T. J. Warthen; 4th N. C., Col. George B. Anderson; 49th Va., Col. William Smith. Unattached: 2d Fla., Col. George T. Ward (k); 2d Miss. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. John G. Taylor. Unattached loss: k, 9; w, 61; m, 11 = 81. cavalry Br
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
hly returns of the Army of Northern Virginia. . . . The following statements have been taken from those papers by Major Walter H. Taylor, of the staff of General Lee. . . . A statement of the strength of the troops under General Johnston shows th., Part III., p. 531, the reserve artillery numbered 920.--Editors. total effective men, 53,688. The above is from Major Taylor's memorandum given the President, made from estimates of brigades, not from returns. Without being accurate, it is not far from the truth; corrected as above, Magruder should be given 15,920 men. Mr. Davis continues: Major Taylor in his work ( Four years with General Lee ) states: In addition to the troops above enumerated, . . . there were two brigades subject these three brigades, according to the Reports of the Operations of the Army of Northern Virginia, was 5008 effectives. Taylor says: If the strength of these five be added to the return of May 21st, we shall have 62,696 as the effective strength of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
Lieut.-Col. John G. Taylor; 5th N. C., Col. D. K. McRae, Maj. P. J. Sinclair; 23d N. C., Col. Daniel H. Christie, Lieut.-Col. R. D. Johnston (w); 24th Va., Maj. Richard L. Maury (w); 38th Va., Col. E. C. Edmonds; Ala. Battery, Capt. J. W. Bondurant. Brigade loss: k, 98; w, 600; in, 42 = 740. Rodes's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. E. Rodes (w), Col. John B. Gordon: 5th Ala., Col. C. C. Pegues; 6th Ala., Col. John B. Gordon ; 12th Ala., Col. R. T. Jones (k), Lieut.-Col. B. B. Gayle; 12th Miss., Col. W. H. Taylor; 4th Va. Battalion, Capt. C. C. Otey (k), Capt. John R. Bagby; Va. Battery, Capt. Thomas H. Carter. Brigade loss: k, 241; w, 853; m, 5 = 1099. Rains's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Gabriel J. Rains: 13th Ala., Col. D. B. Fry (w); 26th Ala., Col. E. A. O'Neal (w); 6th Ga.; 23d Ga. Featherston's Brigade, Col. George B. Anderson: 27th Ga., Col. Levi B. Smith (w), Lieut.-Col. Charles T. Zachry; 28th Ga., Capt. John N. Wilcox; 4th N. C., Maj. Bryan Grimes; 49th Va., Col. William Smith (w). Brigade l
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Fighting Jackson at Kernstown. (search)
Jackson's entire force fled from Fremont, crossed the bridge, burned it, and was free from the destruction that had threatened him. Jackson, on the morning of the 9th, with his army, attacked the now united detachments of Tyler and Carroll, and with his overwhelming force compelled the retreat of our small but gallant command. Jackson's own old Stonewall Brigade was first repulsed by Carroll's, and Jackson himself was compelled to rally and lead them back to the contest; then, with Dick Taylor's and other brigades and batteries, he forced our men from the field. See pp. 291-293 for details of the engagements at Port Republic and Cross Keys. On the 9th, at sundown, Shields, now with me, received by the gallant Myles W. Keogh As captain in the 7th United States Cavalry, Keogh was killed in the massacre, by the Sioux, of Custer's command, June 25th, 1876, on a branch of the Little Big Horn River, Montana.--Editors. news from Tyler of his disaster. My brigade was ordered at
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
pulse they advanced new troops upon our diminishing forces, and in such numbers and so rapidly that it appeared as though their reserves were inexhaustible. The action extended along our entire line. At 4 o'clock, when Slocum arrived, all our reserves were exhausted. His brigades were necessarily separated and sent where most needed. Newton's brigade, being in advance, was led to the right of Griffin, there to drive back the enemy and retake ground only held by the enemy for an instant. Taylor's brigade filled vacant spaces in Morell's division, and Bartlett's was sent to Sykes, just in time to render invaluable service, both in resisting and attacking. On the right, near McGehee's, the enemy captured one of our batteries, which had been doing them great damage by enfilading their lines and preventing their advance. They gained thereby a temporary foothold by advancing some infantry; but, prompt to act, Sykes directed its recapture, and the 16th New York, The men of this re
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