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Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 22 0 Browse Search
Appian, The Civil Wars (ed. Horace White) 20 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 20 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 18 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 18 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 16 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 16 0 Browse Search
Plato, Letters 14 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 12 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams). You can also browse the collection for Italy (Italy) or search for Italy (Italy) in all documents.

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P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 4, line 331 (search)
put away the weight of foil and pain, my place would now be found in Troy, among the cherished sepulchres of my own kin, and Priam's mansion proud were standing still; or these my loyal hands had rebuilt Ilium for her vanquished sons. But now to Italy Apollo's power commands me forth; his Lycian oracles are loud for Italy. My heart is there, and there my fatherland. If now the towers of Carthage and thy Libyan colony delight thy Tyrian eyes; wilt thou refuse to Trojan exiles their Ausonian shoon me in my dreams with angered brow. I think of my Ascanius, and the wrong to that dear heart, from whom I steal away Hesperia, his destined home and throne. But now the winged messenger of Heaven, sent down by Jove (I swear by thee and me!), has brought on winged winds his sire's command. My own eyes with unclouded vision saw the god within these walls; I have received with my own ears his word. No more inflame with lamentation fond thy heart and mine. 'T is not my own free act seeks Italy.
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 4, line 362 (search)
t waif and castaway I found in beggary and gave him share— fool that I was!—in my own royal glory. His Iost fleet and his sorry crews I steered from death away. O, how my fevered soul unceasing raves! Forsooth Apollo speaks! His Lycian oracles! and sent by Jove the messenger of Heaven on fleeting air the ruthless bidding brings! Proud business for gods, I trow, that such a task disturbs their still abodes! I hold thee back no more, nor to thy cunning speeches give the lie. Begone! Sail on to Italy, thy throne, through wind and wave! I pray that, if there be any just gods of power, thou mayest drink down death on the mid-sea rocks, and often call with dying gasps on Dido's name—while I pursue with vengeful fire. When cold death rends the body from the breath, my ghost shall sit forever in thy path. Full penalties thy stubborn heart shall pay. They'll bring me never in yon deep gulf of death of all thy woe.” Abrupt her utterance ceased; and sick at heart she fled the light of day, as i
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 5, line 1 (search)
, when only seas and skies were round their way, full in the zenith loomed a purple cloud, storm-laden, dark as night, and every wave grew black and angry; from his Iofty seat the helmsman Palinurus cried, “Alas! What means this host of storms encircling heaven? What, Neptune, wilt thou now?” He, having said, bade reef and tighten, bend to stronger stroke, and slant sail to the wind; then spake again: “High-souled Aeneas, not if Jove the King gave happy omen, would I have good hope of making Italy through yonder sky. Athwart our course from clouded evening-star rebellious winds run shifting, and the air into a cloud-wrack rolls. Against such foes too weak our strife and strain! Since now the hand of Fortune triumphs, let us where she calls obedient go. For near us, I believe, lies Eryx' faithful and fraternal shore: here are Sicilian havens, if my mind of yon familiar stars have knowledge true.” then good Aeneas: “For a friendly wind long have I sued, and watched thee vainly strive
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 5, line 72 (search)
e emblems wore. Then in th' attendant throng conspicuous, with thousands at his side, the hero moved from place of council to his father's tomb. There on the ground he poured libation due, two beakers of good wine, of sweet milk two, two of the victim's blood—and scattered flowers of saddest purple stain, while thus he prayed: “Hail, hallowed sire! And hail, ye ashes dear of him I vainly saved! O soul and shade of my blest father! Heaven to us denied to find together that predestined land of Italy, or our Ausonian stream of Tiber—ah! but where?” He scarce had said, when from the central shrine a gliding snake, coiled seven-fold in seven spirals wide, twined round the tomb and trailed innocuous o'er the very altars; his smooth back was flecked with green and azure, and his changeful scales gleamed golden, as the cloud-born rainbow flings its thousand colors from th' opposing sun. Aeneas breathless watched the serpent wind among the bowls and cups of polished rim, tasting the sacred fe
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 5, line 114 (search)
First, side by side, with sturdy, rival oars, four noble galleys, pride of all the fleet, come forward to contend. The straining crew of Mnestheus bring his speedy Pristis on, — Mnestheus in Italy erelong the sire of Memmius' noble line. Brave Gyas guides his vast Chimaera, a colossal craft, a floating city, by a triple row of Dardan sailors manned, whose banks of oars in triple order rise. Sergestus, he of whom the Sergian house shall after spring, rides in his mighty Centaur. Next in line, on sky-blue Scylla proud Cloanthus rides — whence thy great stem, Cluentius of Ro
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 5, line 545 (search)
n each bright brow a well-trimmed wreath the flowing tresses bound; two javelins of corner tipped with steel each bore for arms; some from the shoulder slung a polished quiver; to each bosom fell a pliant necklace of fine, twisted gold. Three bands of horsemen ride, three captains proud prance here and there, assiduous in command, each of his twelve, who shine in parted lines which lesser captains lead. One cohort proud follows a little Priam's royal name — one day, Polites, thy illustrious race through him prolonged, shall greater glory bring to Italy. A dappled Thracian steed with snow-white spots and fore-feet white as snow bears him along, its white face lifted high. Next Atys rode, young Atys, sire to be of th' Atian house in Rome, a boy most dear unto the boy Iulus; last in line, and fairest of the throng, Iulus came, astride a steed from Sidon, the fond gift of beauteous Dido and her pledge of love. Close followed him the youthful chivalry of King Acestes on Trinacrian steeds
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 5, line 623 (search)
“O ye ill-starred, that were not seized and slain by Grecian foes under your native walls! O tribe accursed, what death is Fate preparing? Since Troy fell the seventh summer flies, while still we rove o'er cruel rocks and seas, from star to star, from alien land to land, as evermore we chase, storm-tossed, that fleeting Italy across the waters wide. Behold this land of Eryx, of Acestes, friend and kin; what hinders them to raise a rampart here and build a town? O city of our sires! O venerated gods from haughty foes rescued in vain! Will nevermore a wall rise in the name of Troy? Shall I not see a Xanthus or a Simois, the streams to Hector dear? Come now! I lead the way. Let us go touch their baneful ships with fire! I saw Cassandra in a dream. Her shade, prophetic ever, gave me firebrands, and cried, ‘Find Ilium so! The home for thee is where thou art.’ Behold, the hour is ripe for our great act! No longer now delay to heed the heavenly omen. Yonder stand four altars unto Neptune. '<
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 5, line 719 (search)
ark night had brought her chariot to the middle sky, the sacred shade of Sire Anchises seemed, from heaven descending, thus to speak aloud: “My son, than life more dear, when life was mine! O son, upon whose heart the Trojan doom has weighed so Iong! Beside thy couch I stand, at pleasure of great Jove, whose hand dispelled the mad fire from thy ships; and now he looks from heaven with pitying brow. I bid thee heed the noble counsels aged Nautes gave. Only with warriors of dauntless breast to Italy repair; of hardy breed, of wild, rough life, thy Latin foes will be. But first the shores of Pluto and the Shades thy feet must tread, and through the deep abyss of dark Avernus come to me, thy sire: for I inhabit not the guilty gloom of Tartarus, but bright Elysian day, where all the just their sweet assemblies hold. Hither the virgin Sibyl, if thou give full offerings of the blood of sable kine, shall lead thee down; and visions I will show of cities proud and nations sprung from thee. Far
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 6, line 77 (search)
ed lips, and soon subdued Her spirit fierce, and swayed her at his will. Free and self-moved the cavern's hundred adoors Swung open wide, and uttered to the air The oracles the virgin-priestess sung : “Thy long sea-perils thou hast safely passed; But heavier woes await thee on the land. Truly thy Trojans to Lavinian shore Shall come—vex not thyself thereon—but, oh! Shall rue their coming thither! war, red war! And Tiber stained with bloody foam I see. Simois, Xanthus, and the Dorian horde Thou shalt behold; a new Achilles now In Latium breathes,—he, too, of goddess born; And Juno, burden of the sons of Troy, Will vex them ever; while thyself shalt sue In dire distress to many a town and tribe Through Italy; the cause of so much ill Again shall be a hostess-queen, again A marriage-chamber for an alien bride. Oh! yield not to thy woe, but front it ever, And follow boldly whither Fortune calls. Thy way of safety, as thou least couldst dream, Lies through a city of the Greeks, thy
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 6, line 337 (search)
me down beneath the wave, For that strong rudder unto which I clung, My charge and duty, and my ship's sole guide, Wrenched from its place, dropped with me as I fell. Not for myself—by the rude seas I swear— Did I have terror, but lest thy good ship, Stripped of her gear, and her poor pilot lost, Should fail and founder in that rising flood. Three wintry nights across the boundless main The south wind buffeted and bore me on; At the fourth daybreak, lifted from the surge, I looked at last on Italy, and swam With weary stroke on stroke unto the land. Safe was I then. Alas! but as I climbed With garments wet and heavy, my clenched hand Grasping the steep rock, came a cruel horde Upon me with drawn blades, accounting me— So blind they were!—a wrecker's prize and spoil. Now are the waves my tomb; and wandering winds Toss me along the coast. 0, I implore, By heaven's sweet light, by yonder upper air, By thy lost father, by lulus dear, Thy rising hope and joy, that from these woes, Unconqu
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