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Isocrates, On the Peace (ed. George Norlin), section 86 (search)
ens in all the rest of her history. Two hundred ships which set sail for Egypt perished with their crews,These were sent to aid Inarus of Egypt in his revolt against Persia, 460 B.C. See Thuc. 1.104 ff. and a hundred and fifty off the island of Cyprus;Thucydides (Thuc. 1.112) speaks of a fleet of 200 ships of which 60 were sent to Egypt, the remainder under Cimon laying siege to Citium in Cyprus. This expedition, though expensive in the loss of men and money, was not disastrous like the formeCyprus. This expedition, though expensive in the loss of men and money, was not disastrous like the former. in the Decelean WarThe text is very uncertain. The reading of the London papyrus is at least preferable since the loss of 10,000 hoplites (unless a hopeless exaggeration) cannot be accounted for if the reading of *g*e or that of the other MSS. is adopted. See Laistner in Classical Quarterly xv. p. 81. At the beginning of the Peloponnesian War (according to Thuc. 2.13), the Athenian heavy-armed troops numbered but 29,000. Later (according to Dem. 25.51), the whole body of Athenian
Isocrates, Evagoras (ed. George Norlin), section 18 (search)
and no warrior of repute was absent, Achilles above all distinguished himself in these perils. And Ajax was second to him in valor, and Teucer, who proved himself worthy of their kinship and inferior to none of the other heroes, after he had helped in the capture of Troy, went to Cyprus and founded Salamis, giving to it the name of his former native landThe island Salamis near Athens.; and he left behind him the family that now reigns.
Isocrates, Evagoras (ed. George Norlin), section 51 (search)
The most convincing proof of the character and uprightness of Evagoras is this—that many of the most reputable Greeks left their own fatherlands and came to Cyrus to dwell, because they considered Evagoras's rule less burdensome and more equitable than that of their own governments at home.E.g., Andocides, the Athenian orator, who had an estate in Cyprus (cf. Andoc. 1.4), and other Greeks who were forced into exile. To mention all the others by name would be too great a
Isocrates, Evagoras (ed. George Norlin), section 53 (search)
for the result of his visit to Cyprus was that he both conferred and received most benefits. In the first place, no sooner had Evagoras and Conon met one another than they esteemed each other more highly than those who before had been their intimate friends. Again, they not only were in complete harmony all their lives regarding all other matters, but also in matters relating to our own city they held to the same opinion.
Isocrates, Evagoras (ed. George Norlin), section 58 (search)
For he was manifestly more concerned about the war in Cyprus than about any other, and regarded Evagoras as a more powerful and formidable antagonist than Cyrus, who had disputed the throne with him.Cf. Xen. Anab. 1 for the famous expedition of Cyrus the Younger against his brother Artaxerxes II. See Isoc. 4.145. The most convincing proof of this statement is this: when the king heard of the preparations Cyrus was making he viewed him with such contempt that because of his indifference Cyrus almost stood at the doors of his palace before he was aware of him.The battle of Cunaxa (401 B.C.) in which Cyrus was slain. The distance from Babylon, according to Xenophon, was 360 stades (c. 45 miles). With regard to Evagoras, however, the king had stood in terror of him for so long a time that even while he was receiving benefits from him he had undertaken to make war upon him—a wrongful act, indeed, but his purpose was not altogether unre
Isocrates, Evagoras (ed. George Norlin), section 60 (search)
Therefore it was not in anger for the events of the past, but with forebodings for the future, nor yet fearing for Cyprus alone, but for reasons far weightier, that he undertook the war against Evagoras. In any case he threw himself into it with such ardor that he expended on this expedition more than fifteen thousand talents.A talent of gold was worth about $1200 or 300 pounds.
Isocrates, Evagoras (ed. George Norlin), section 62 (search)
but when he was forced to go to war, he proved so valiant, and had so valiant an ally in his son Pnytagoras, that he almost subdued the whole of Cyprus, ravaged Phoenicia, took Tyre by storm, caused Cilicia to revolt from the king, and slew so many of his enemies that many of the Persians, when they mourn over their sorrows, recall the valor of EvagorasCf. Isoc. 4.161..
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book 1, section 122 (search)
s to the Tharsians, for so was Cilicia of old called; the sign of which is this, that the noblest city they have, and a metropolis also, is Tarsus, the tau being by change put for the theta. Cethimus possessed the island Cethima: it is now called Cyprus; and from that it is that all islands, and the greatest part of the sea-coasts, are named Cethim by the Hebrews: and one city there is in Cyprus that has been able to preserve its denomination; it has been called Citius by those who use the languCyprus that has been able to preserve its denomination; it has been called Citius by those who use the language of the Greeks, and has not, by the use of that dialect, escaped the name of Cethim. And so many nations have the children and grandchildren of Japhet possessed. Now when I have premised somewhat, which perhaps the Greeks do not know, I will return and explain what I have omitted; for such names are pronounced here after the manner of the Greeks, to please my readers; for our own country language does not so pronounce them: but the names in all cases are of one and the same ending; for the na
Lycurgus, Against Leocrates, section 73 (search)
And to crown their victory: not content with erecting the trophy in Salamis, they fixed for the Persian the boundaries necessary for Greek freedom and prevented his overstepping them, making an agreement that he should not sail his warships between the Cyaneae and Phaselis and that the Greeks should be free not only if they lived in Europe but in Asia too.Lycurgus seems to be referring in exaggerated terms to the campaign in which the Athenians won a naval victory off Cyprus (qv. Thuc. 1.112). That he connects it with the battle of the Eurymedon which took place some eighteen years earlier (c. 467 B.C.) need not surprise us, in view of his other inaccuracies (cf. Lyc. 1.62 and Lyc. 1.70). The agreement in question is the so-called Peace of Callias (c. 448 B.C.), about which nothing certain is known. His account of the sea limit agrees substantially with that of other orators (e.g. Isoc. 12.59; Dem. 19.273), but the old triumphs over Persia were exaggerated in the fourth
Lysias, Against Andocides, section 6 (search)
For Andocides is by no means unknown either to foreigners or to our own people, such has been the impiety of his conduct; since it needs must be that, if they are specially outstanding, either good or evil deeds make their doers well-known. And besides, during his absence abroad he has caused commotion in many cities, in Sicily, Italy, the Peloponnese, Thessaly, the Hellespont, Ionia and Cyprus: he has flattered many kings—everyone with whom he has had dealings, except Dionysius of Syracuse
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