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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 14 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 16, 1862., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 11 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 11 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Headquarters moved to Memphis-on the road to Memphis-escaping Jackson-complaints and requests-halleck appointed commander-in-chief --return to Corinth — movements of Bragg- surrender of Clarksville — the advance upon Chattanooga-Sheridan Colonel of a Michigan regiment (search)
repair the Memphis and Charleston railroad as he advanced. Troops had been sent north by Halleck along the line of the Mobile and Ohio railroad to put it in repair as far as Columbus. Other troops were stationed on the railroad from Jackson, Tennessee, to Grand Junction, and still others on the road west to Memphis. The remainder of the magnificent army of 120,000 men which entered Corinth on the 30th of May had now become so scattered that I was put entirely on the defensive in a teinth and along the railroad eastward, I regarded as sufficient for protection against any attack from the west. The Mobile and Ohio railroad was guarded from Rienzi. south of Corinth, to Columbus; and the Mississippi Central railroad from Jackson, Tennessee, to Bolivar. Grand Junction and La Grange on the Memphis railroad were abandoned. South of the Army of the Tennessee, and confronting it, was [Earl] Van Dorn, with a sufficient force to organize a movable army of thirty-five to forty t
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Advance of Van Dorn and Price-Price enters Iuka --battle of Iuka (search)
army, were very anxious, as I have said, about affairs both in East and Middle Tennessee; and my anxiety was quite as great on their account as for any danger threatening my command. I had not force enough at Corinth to attack Price even by stripping everything; and there was danger that before troops could be got from other points he might be far on his way across the Tennessee. To prevent this all spare forces at Bolivar and Jackson were ordered to Corinth, and cars were concentrated at Jackson for their transportation. Within twenty-four hours from the transmission of the order the troops were at their destination, although there had been a delay of four hours resulting from the forward train getting off the track and stopping all the others. This gave a reinforcement of near 8,000 men, General Ord in command. General Rosecrans commanded the district of Corinth with a movable force of about 9,000, independent of the garrison deemed necessary to be left behind. It was known th
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Van Dorn's movements-battle of Corinth-command of the Department of the Tennessee (search)
rmation in force, and then often returned without it. On the 22d Bolivar was threatened by a large force from south of Grand Junction, supposed to be twenty regiments of infantry with cavalry and artillery. I reinforced Bolivar, and went to Jackson in person to superintend the movement of troops to whatever point the attack might be made upon. The troops from Corinth were brought up in time to repel the threatened movement without a battle. Our cavalry followed the enemy south of Davis' he Mobile and Ohio railroads, and were thus between the troops at Corinth and all possible reinforcements. Any fresh troops for us must come by a circuitous route. On the night of the 3d, accordingly, I ordered General McPherson, who was at Jackson, to join Rosecrans at Corinth with reinforcements picked up along the line of the railroad equal to a brigade. Hurlbut had been ordered from Bolivar to march for the same destination; and as Van Dorn was coming upon Corinth from the north-west
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The campaign against Vicksburg-Employing the freedmen-occupation of Holly Springs-Sherman ordered to Memphis-Sherman's movements down the Mississippi-Van Dorn captures Holly Springs-collecting forage and food (search)
st Vicksburg commenced on the 2d of November as indicated in a dispatch to the general-in-chief in the following words: I have commenced a movement on Grand Junction, with three divisions from Corinth and two from Bolivar. Will leave here [Jackson, Tennessee] to-morrow, and take command in person. If found practicable, I will go to Holly Springs, and, may be, Grenada, completing railroad and telegraph as I go. At this time my command was holding the Mobile and Ohio railroad from about twent the 8th Wisconsin regiment, and destroyed all our munitions of war, food and forage. The capture was a disgraceful one to the officer commanding but not to the troops under him. At the same time Forrest got on our line of railroad between Jackson, Tennessee, and Columbus, Kentucky, doing much damage to it. This cut me off from all communication with the north for more than a week, and it was more than two weeks before rations or forage could be issued from stores obtained in the regular way. T
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Capture of Port Gibson-Grierson's raid-occupation of Grand Gulf-movement up the Big Black- battle of Raymond (search)
On the 3d Hurlbut, who had been left at Memphis, was ordered to send four regiments from his command to Milliken's Bend to relieve Blair's division, and on the 5th he was ordered to send [Jacob G.] Lauman's division in addition, the latter to join the army in the field. The four regiments were to be taken from troops near the river so that there would be no delay. During the night of the 6th McPherson drew in his troops north of the Big Black and was off at an early hour on the road to Jackson, via Rocky Springs, Utica and Raymond. That night he and McClernand were both at Rocky Springs ten miles from Hankinson's ferry. McPherson remained there during the 8th, while McClernand moved to Big Sandy and Sherman marched from Grand Gulf to Hankinson's ferry. The 8th [9th], McPherson moved to a point within a few miles west of Utica; McClernand and Sherman remained where they were. On the 10th McPherson moved to Utica, Sherman to Big Sandy; McClernand was still at Big Sandy. The 1
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 38 (search)
ment of the capital; and many of our people will regard it as a preliminary to the evacuation of Richmond. It is more the effect of extortion and high prices, than apprehension of the city being taken by the enemy. April 20 A clear morning, but a cold, cloudy day. The following dispatch from Gen. Forrest shows that the bloody work has commenced in earnest: Demopolis, Ala., April 19th. to Gen. S. Cooper. The following dispatch has just been received from Gen. Forrest, dated Jackson, Tenn., April 15th. L. Polk, Lieut.-General. I attacked Fort Pillow on the morning of the 12th inst., with a part of Bell's and McCulloch's brigades, numbering--, under Brig.-Gen. J. R. Chalmers. After a short fight we drove the enemy, seven hundred strong, into the fort, under cover of their gun-boats, and demanded a surrender, which was declined by Major L. W. Booth, commanding United States forces. I stormed the fort, and after a contest of thirty minutes captured the entire garriso
have no suggestions from Grant or Logan, and waited his own time to find, when he issued his celebrated order of attack of May 30, no enemy on his front. Soon after Halleck was called to Washington and Grant, untrammelled by a martinet, began his campaign in pursuit of the wily enemy. Our gallant army continued the chase, stopping ever and anon to fight a battle and scale fortifications, or rout the enemy. After Corinth came the trying and tedious march through the enemy's country to Jackson, Lagrange, and Memphis, Tennessee. In the fall and winter of 1862-3 General Logan's command was encamped at Memphis, Tennessee. The general had been almost constantly in the saddle from the time he reached Shiloh and joined his command in the movement against Corinth. The weather was inclement and the condition of the roads dreadful, the streets of the city being well-nigh impassable. On hearing that General Logan had reached Memphis, I applied for transportation to join him, and
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 3: battle of Manassas, or Bull Run. (search)
tery, Pendleton's, and Pelham's, and part of the Washington Artillery were up in time to aid Jackson in his new formation and relieve our discomfited troops rallying on his flank. As they rose on the forward crest, Bee saw, on the farther side, Jackson's line, serene as if in repose, affording a haven so promising of cover that he gave the christening of Stonewall for the immortal Jackson. There, said he, is Jackson, standing like a stone wall. General Johnston and General Beauregard reelves in getting the troops together and in lines of defence. Other reinforcements were ordered from the right, including the reserve brigades at McLean's and Union Mills Fords, and a number of batteries. Bee and Evans reformed their lines upon Jackson's. After permitting Burnside's brigade to retire for rest, McDowell pushed his battle by his strong artillery arm, advancing against and turning the Confederate left, only giving some little time to select positions for his batteries to plunge m
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 10: fighting along the Chickahominy. (search)
ur march. Near Crenshaw's the road on which the column commanded by Major-General Ewell [of Jackson's] was advancing and that on which I was advancing approach within one-fourth of a mile of eachykes doubled on him, recovered it, and put it again into action. Parts of Ewell and Lawton, of Jackson's, came in on D. H. Hill's right. Meanwhile, A. P. Hill had fought to exhaustion, and found hd the captured guns against their late owners. General Whiting asked for another brigade of Jackson's that had reported to me, and turned his forces against the enemy's line on our left. The div reopen connection with his base on the Pamunkey, General Lee sent Stuart's cavalry and part of Jackson's command (Ewell's) to interpose on that line. They cut the line at Despatch Station, where EwMcCall's left; Sedgwick's division, Sumner's corps, behind McCall. Before noon of the 30th, Jackson's column encountered Franklin, defending the principal crossing of White Oak Swamp by the divis
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 23: battle of Fredericksburg (continued). (search)
and therefore his position was in no danger of attack; that the attack would be aimed against Jackson's front; that in case it broke through there he should swing around to his right and take the aght o'clock the order came, and at 8.30 Meade's division moved towards the general direction of Jackson's position. At ten o'clock the fog lifted and revealed Meade's lines, six batteries on his r Birney and Sickles and the reserve batteries. Doubleday's division protected Meade's left as Jackson's right under Taliaferro partially engaged against them; both encountered loss. Hood got one olow the troops as they retired towards their reserve line. At the first moment of the break on Jackson's lines Pickett rode to Hood and urged that the opportunity anticipated was at hand, but Hood fement; La. Guard Art., Capt. Louis E. D'Aquin; Staunton (Va.) Art., Lieut. Asher W. Garber. Jackson's division, Brig.-Gen. William B. Taliaferro:--First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. F. Paxton; 2d Va.,
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