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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 4 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 2 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 4 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 2 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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cupied the divisions of both Buford and Kilpatrick, with the result that Stuart withdrew across the Rapidan. In October, General Lee entered upon what is known as the Bristoe campaign, which aimed at turning the right flank of the Federal army in Culpeper County. To cover this movement, Stuart distributed his command over a wide extent of country and along the Rapidan. On the 10th, Stuart was ordered to make a reconnaissance toward Catlett's Station. He sent Lomax forward, who moved to Auburn, and there learned that the Federals were in force at Warrenton Junction. He further discovered that the entire Federal wagon train was parked in a position easy of access. It was most desirable that its commissary supplies should be so applied as to appease the hunger of his half-starved cavalrymen. Stuart consequently moved in that direction, and on reaching a piece of woods there was plainly seen, about half a mile beyond, the vast park of wagons. Stuart gazed long and ardently at thi
the afternoon of the following day the Union cavalry pickets were furiously attacked, and before the leading troops could dismount and conduct the led horses to the rear, an entire brigade of Where the cavalry rested — Castle Murray, near Auburn, Virginia In the fall of 1863 the headquarters of the Army of the Potomac were pitched for some days on the Warrentown Railroad near Auburn, Virginia. Near-by lay Dr. Murray's house, called the Castle, a picturesque gray stone edifice, beautifullyAuburn, Virginia. Near-by lay Dr. Murray's house, called the Castle, a picturesque gray stone edifice, beautifully contrasting with the dark green ivy which had partly overgrown it, and situated in a grove on an eminence known as Rockhill. Here General Pleasonton, commanding the cavalry, had his camp, his tents forming an effective picture when silhouetted by the setting sun against the gray walls of the Castle. At night the green lamps that showed the position of the general's Camp would shine mysteriously over the trees, and the band of the Sixth United States Cavalry would make the stone walls echo to
who was disabled for life by wounds received in the battle of Gettysburg), Lieutenant William H. Johnson (wounded at Gettysburg and mortally wounded at Winchester), and Lieutenant Theodore Atkins, sunstruck during the fierce cannonade at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863, and incapacitated for further service in the army. Private Henry Hiser, in charge of the officers' mess at the time, is leaning against the tent-pole. The first Independent Battery of Light Artillery from New York was organized at Auburn and mustered in November 23, 1861. It was on duty in the defenses of Washington until March, 1862, when it moved to the Peninsula by way of Fortress Monroe. Its first action was at Lee's Mills, April 5, 1861; it took part in the siege of Yorktown, and fought at Lee's Mills again on April 16th. It served throughout the Peninsula campaign, and in all the big battles of the Army of the Potomac throughout the war. It helped to repulse Early's attack on Washington, and fought with Sheridan in
rds that as late as March 30, 1865, he encountered one of Sheridan's bands under heavy fire at Five Forks, playing Nellie Bly as cheerfully as if it were furnishing music for a country picnic. The top photograph shows one of the cavalry bands at Auburn, in the fall of 1863. The frayed trousers of the band below show hard service. Evening music at Pleasonton's headquarters, Auburn, 1863 The music that stayed with the soldiers—Talty's fifers and drummers < A band that had seen serviceAuburn, 1863 The music that stayed with the soldiers—Talty's fifers and drummers < A band that had seen service, near Fairfax, 1863 must have matured ten years. What sights had they seen, what miles had they marched, what furious battles had they fought, yet to what end? In spite of all their struggles and all their sacrifices, here they lay along the same familiar slopes and fields, with the same turbid stream still barring the southward way. Once had the grand Army of the Potomac, led by McClellan, turned the opposing line, tried the water route, marched up the Peninsula, and after a few weeks of fi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Bristoe campaign-preliminary report of General R. E. Lee. (search)
therefore, deemed unnecessary, and after destroying the railroad from Cub run southwardly to the Rappahannock, the army returned on the 18th to the line of that river, leaving the cavalry in the enemy's front. The cavalry of the latter advanced on the following day, and some skirmishing occurred at Buckland. General Stuart, with Hampton's division, retired slowly towards Warrenton in order to draw the enemy in that direction, thus exposing his flank and rear to General Lee, who moved from Auburn and attacked him near Buckland. As soon as General Stuart heard the sound of Lee's guns, he turned upon the enemy, who, after a stubborn resistance, broke and fled in confusion, pursued by General Stuart nearly to Haymarket and by General Lee to Gainesville. Here the Federal infantry was encountered, and after capturing a number of them during the night, the cavalry slowly retired before their advance on the following day. When the movement of the army from the Rapidan commenced, General I
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 30 (search)
e the position which it was my desire to do, and which I was determined, if possible, to do, so as to place myself between the enemy and Washington, with my back towards Washington and my front towards the enemy. I therefore moved back as far as Auburn, and Greenwich, and Catlett's Station. Those were the three points occupied by my army along the line of the railroad. During that night I vainly endeavored, by means of my cavalry, to get some information as to the exact position and movementaken, and that, notwithstanding my losing a day, I had moved with more celerity than the enemy, and was a little in his advance. If I had known this at the time I would have given the enemy battle next day in the position that I had occupied at Auburn and Greenwich. But under the conviction that he was moving on, and had moved on, I that night gave orders for a further retrograde movement, until I occupied the line of Centreville and Bull Run. In performing the movement the next day, I ascer
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Virginia, 1863 (search)
nded, 20 missing. Total, 25. Oct. 1: Skirmish near Culpeper Court HousePENNSYLVANIA--4th Cavalry. Oct. 1: Skirmish near AuburnPENNSYLVANIA--1st Cavalry (Detachment). Union loss, 2 wounded. Oct. 3: Skirmish, LewinsvilleNEW YORK--111th Infantry. Oct. 13: Skirmish, JeffersontonPENNSYLVANIA--12th Cavalry. Oct. 13: Skirmish near Warrenton(No Reports.) Oct. 13: Action, AuburnMAINE--17th Infantry. MASSACHUSETTS--10th Battery Light Arty. MICHIGAN--3d and 5th Infantry. NEW JERSEY--Battery "B," Lighery "I," 1st Arty., and "A," 4th Arty. Union loss, 50 killed, 335 wounded, 161 missing. Total, 546. Oct. 14: Engagement, Auburn, Auburn Mills, Auburn FordCONNECTICUT--14th Infantry. DELAWARE--2d Infantry. INDIANA--14th Infantry. MAINE--1st Cavalry. Affair near WeaversvilleConfederate Reports. Nov. 1: Skirmish, Catlett's StationINDIANA--3d Cavalry. Nov. 1: Skirmish, AuburnPENNSYLVANIA--68th Infantry. Nov. 4: Skirmish near FalmouthVERMONT--1st Cavalry. Nov. 5: Skirmish, Hartwood ChurchOHIO--
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 33: the advance to Culpepper and Bealton. (search)
til 9 o'clock in the evening that the corps bivouacked on the south side of Cedar Run, not far from the little village of Auburn. Thus ended the 13th of October. The fourteenth day of October was a memorable one in the history of the Nineteenth rr o'clock in the morning, the corps started, as rear guard of the retreating army and crossed Cedar Run in a heavy fog at Auburn, which is described by Stewart's biographer as a little hamlet consisting of the residence of Stephen McCormick, a post o wood during the night, opened with artillery on the larger part of the first division which was massed on a hill back of Auburn; the remainder, Brook's brigade, being thrown out to the front, covered the route to Greenwich, from which direction the vision was moving down the Catlett's. Station road, followed by the Second, which was then crossing the difficult ford of Auburn. A brigade of the Third Division immediately threw out skirmishers and formed line of battle, which, with the help of ar
the enemy. The men had traversed the roads so often that they began to seem like old acquaintances. The first night was spent in a bivouac at Bristoe Station. On the following day the line moved to Gainesville, then to Greenwich and then to Auburn, no rebels being encountered. This march was over some of the worst roads in Virginia. During the day the men forded five streams, three of them knee deep, and for a portion of the day they did not get an opportunity to remove the water from thanother autumn might find his bones whitening on some field far from home. They took no thought, however, of future possibilities, borrowed no trouble and contentedly trudged along. During the 21st and 22nd of October the regiment remained at Auburn, and here the mails were received, the first for over a fortnight. On October 23 the regiment was moved to near the railroad, about half way between Warrenton and Warrenton Junction. Two weeks were spent here. The camp was pitched on a high
inia, ..................................................... 119 Appomattox Court House, ............................................ 363 Aqueduct Bridge,................................................... 122 Aquia Creek, ............................................119, 120, 160, 213 Ash, David B., ........................................................83, 103 Atkens, Benjamin H.,........................................249, 262 Atlantic Transport,............................ 119 Auburn, Va.,...................................................... 267, 273 Axe Handle Brigade,. ............................................ 37 Aytoun, James F., ...................................... 290, 352, 353, 356 Badges, Corps, brigade, regimental, ...................................... 211 Bailey, Warren K.,............................................ .... 106 Bailey, William H., ........................................ 249 Bailey's Cross Roads, Va.,...............................
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